Question on ease of build.

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by sab, Dec 9, 2009.

  1. sab
    Joined: Dec 2009
    Posts: 11
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 21
    Location: Bellmore NY

    sab Junior Member

    Obviously I am new to the board so forgive me if this has been cover before. I tried doing a search but couldn't come up with the answer. Depending on which website I go on I get different answers. I'm looking for unbiased opinions. I am a first time wooden boat builder who wants to build a duck boat. Glass over wood. In your opinion, which would be best for me ? Stitch and glue or frame ? I am handy with tools and the type of water would be marsh type close to shore, never more than 1/2 a mile (if that makes a difference) Can I hear what you think and why you think I should build one over the other ? Thanks

    Sab
     
  2. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
    Posts: 3,731
    Likes: 121, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1404
    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    Stitch and glue will be the easiest, using epoxy resin. It's up to you whether you do more than tape the seams. I would glass the outer bottom on a duck boat where you'll be dragging it up the shore over rocks and gravel.
    You could choose a stitch and glue design or a more traditional plywood design that uses chine logs and wasn't likely designed to use fiberglass in the first place, but the older design will require more attention to fits as there's no thickened epoxy to bridge gaps.
    All depends on your ability, though the framed boat isn't necessarily superior to the more easily built stitch and glue boat.
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 476, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The basic differences between the two methods is one (taped seam) has a high "goo factor" (lots of epoxy use), but a minimal number of pieces to cut and assemble, while the other (plank over frame) has a low goo factor, but needs lots of little bits of boat to be cut and assembled.

    The plank on frame method makes for a heavier boat, which isn't good for small boats. The stitch and glue build will be lighter and easier to make water tight, but working with epoxy (goo) can be messy and frustrating to some novice builders.

    If you're comfortable following instructions and aren't afraid of new stuff (like mixing goo) then the taped seam build will be an easier time. On the other hand, if you're well entrenched with planks over a frame, then this may be easier for you to understand and get along with.
     
  4. sab
    Joined: Dec 2009
    Posts: 11
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 21
    Location: Bellmore NY

    sab Junior Member

    Thanks for the help guys, I was leaning towards the stitch and glue and I think you helped me confirm it.

    Sab
     

  5. Herman
    Joined: Oct 2004
    Posts: 1,618
    Likes: 89, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 1240
    Location: The Netherlands

    Herman Senior Member

    Buy some epoxy, and make some tests. Fix 2 sheets of wood in an angle to each other, leaving a small gap, and try to glue them together. You might mess up the first time, or make an less nice looking joint, but at least you have the first parts of the learning curve on a piece of scrap wood.

    Further in the learning curve you will see you are able to make the joint without problems, but you can still speed up things. After you have done a couple of meters, you will get used to it.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. jonny2779
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    1,255
  2. Joey Bergeron
    Replies:
    50
    Views:
    931
  3. Travis Grauel
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    747
  4. Tim Rowe
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    433
  5. OrcaSea
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    697
  6. OrcaSea
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    1,028
  7. juan manuel luna
    Replies:
    21
    Views:
    1,768
  8. DSR
    Replies:
    18
    Views:
    2,048
  9. Windship277
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    1,151
  10. Windship277
    Replies:
    112
    Views:
    7,838
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.