Putting it all together.

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by LP, Jan 7, 2007.

  1. troy2000
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    I think it's a great wheel. But like you, I also think it's out of place on your particular boat.
     
  2. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    LP Flying Boatman

    Be sure to turn the telly off. Sweet dreams.

    Tom Bodett and leaving the light on is a reference to a hotel chain here in the States. Tom Bodett for Motel 6 says, "We'll leave the light on for you." Just their bit of a jingle.
     
  3. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    LP Flying Boatman

    Back at it today. Cable boots were put in place. The motor was rehung. The motor wiring harness was removed and cut open. The tach and kill wires were split apart, reassembled individually and the harness was placed back on the motor.

    The horn was located on the forward deck. The rest of the switches were mounted and all of the switch wiring was completed. All lights are functional in all of their independent circuits now. The only double-throw switch I could get that matched the other switches was also a double-pole switch. I was fortunate in this fact as I put to full use in getting the nav lights and the anchor light to work properly. I was going to use some trickery with a diode, but this switch allowed a more proper two circuit control with one switch. I also wired the instrument lights to work in conjunction with the running lights. I started snugging up all of the wire ties behind the instrument panel and will continue tidy that up tomorrow.

    Tomorrow's project will be to pull up the aft sole and clean up the hole for the bilge pump line and install the fuel tank support. There may be accomplishments, but we'll just take those as they come. Sorry, no pictures today. I'll try to get some up tomorrow.
     
  4. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Just a quick pic.

    A view from "down under." :D

    IMG_1821.JPG

    Wiring behind the dash. Good golly. Never put two wires next to each other! They multiply and multiply! Everything is all tucked in and neat as it gets. Note the fused power junction in the upper right corner with a ground bus mounted behind it.

    Right to left (port to starboard :p), the switches are anchor/running/instrument lights, courtesy/boarding lights, red working lights (aft area and white light in storage area under forward benches), bilge pump, and accessory master. The accessory master is empty now, but I plan to wire the fish finder/gps and marine radio through this switch. Similar to an avionics master in an aircraft.
     
  5. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Fueling the Fire.

    Been a busy few days. I've been in decon mode to get to recon mode.

    Lots of pictures, too! I've been cutting holes for bilge pump lines, drilling holes for brackets and boots and bolts. All of these holes have to be coated with epoxy, several times. The engine is finally bolted on. The two lower bolts fall below the splash well and would require fuel tank removal if I simply installed the bolts. Instead, I put 404 to work and bonded over the nut ends. Add a little maple flour and it turns wood colored. The holey white object is the fuel tank support.

    IMG_1834.jpg

    Around to the side of the splash well, the bilge pump discharge is located. A double was added due to an uneven "backside" surface.

    IMG_1835.jpg

    Then all of the plumbing was added. Right to left you have the bilge pump discharge, the fuel tank fuel line, the fuel tank fuller hose and the fuel tank vent line.

    IMG_1825.jpg

    Pulling back, the primer bulb is located out of sight behind the back seat (removed), but withing easy reach.

    IMG_1826.jpg

    Pulling back a bit more for the general fuel tank layout.

    IMG_1827.jpg

    And, another step back shows the bilge pump location. It nests up against the keelson when in proper location.

    IMG_1828.jpg

    The filer neck was a bit of a pain and it took some serious thinking to determine a usable lay-out back when I was doing the original cutting for the components. There is a lack of free space back in this area when penetrating the deck for the fueling fittings. This next photo is looking down the filler fitting hole. The deck had to be preloaded with hose clamps. They were compressed to put them in place and then expanded to hold them in place while the filler tube was inserted. You can also see the hose clamps in position on the tank, waiting to receive the filler hose. Note the hollowing of the splash well side to provide clearance for the filler hose.

    IMG_1837.jpg

    From the splash well side, another hole had been drilled strictly to provide access for tightening the upper fueling hose clamps. This access hole was able to be utilized for the fuel line exit the hull into the splashwell.

    IMG_1836.jpg

    The fuel line entering the spalshwell with the fuel filter and shutoff arrangement.

    IMG_1829.jpg

    The forward deck with all of it's hardware. I'm still undecided on the horn. I felt the boat screamed trumpet horns, but I think these overwhelm the forward deck.

    IMG_1840.jpg

    And then, a parting shot.

    IMG_1842.jpg

    I registered the boat today and have a weather window for tomorrow that is too good to turn down. Fingers are crossed that tomorrow is dunk day.

    I have two propellers for the boat. I've not paid any attention to them until today. One is a 10" diameter with a 12" pitch and the other is a 10 3/4" diameter with an 11" pitch. I'm sure that I will try both of them, but I'm curious if anyone would have insight as to the more suitable prop. In theory, the 12" pitch has more possible top end speed, but the fact that it is a smaller may limit it's thrust. (?) The 11" would be better for low end performance, but the fact that it is bigger means it would also load up more and defeat the pitch advantage. (?) I fear the motor could stand to be larger and so the boat will not go as fast as this engine could potentially push another lighter or smaller boat. To that end I would lean towards the lessor pitched prop, if it weren't for the diameter difference in the propellers. In my mind, I almost think it is a wash between the two.... Comments?
     
  6. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Don't forget to soak the prop in a bucket for 24 hours before use.
     
  7. J Feenstra
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    J Feenstra Junior Member

    This may be a stupid question, but why should he soak the prop?
     
  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Greg, why couldn't you have had a slightly sloped panel and a gap along it's lower edge, instead of holes?
     
  9. Dave T
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    Location: Anamosa Iowa and North Buena Vista on the Mississi

    Dave T Senior Member

    I would like to know why you would soak a prop to? Good luck on maiden voyage, nice boat.

    Dave T
     
  10. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Dunked! 29 MPH on 50 HP! :D

    More later.
     
  11. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    LP Flying Boatman

    I think Frosty is making a reference to soaking rubber bands for wind up toys. Undoubtedly, he was offering up his own peculiar brand of humor. :p

    I think the proper procedure is to soak the propeller at the same time as the rest boat. That way they all swell together. :p
     
  12. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    I had to think about this for a while, but finally got the jist of your idea. Do you have a section cut showing it? I probably could have, 6 or 7 years ago. There would be a lot of things that I would do differently if I was starting this project today. I wouldn't have thought of it on my own though. Are you talking about along the sides or the forward end? Sides I imagine. It would make a great invisible exit for cables and controls. I also did a single coaming board from the transom to the forward end of the cockpit. Tilting it or offsetting it would be difficult with the limited beam I have at the stern. It is something I would consider on future builds. Especially with more beam and a bit more freeboard.
     
  13. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    LP Flying Boatman

    Well, I did it. Eight years in the works and it's still not done, but it's been wet and I can use it if I want for the next few weeks.

    One more build photo though. Here is the fuel tank install (with gas), the bilge pump installed and the battery with wiring tidied up.

    IMG_1843.jpg

    Motoring out of the harbour.

    IMG_1848.jpg

    And, back at the dock.

    IMG_1863.jpg

    Maiden voyage. Things forgotten: the fire extinguisher (it stayed in the back of the truck), and the trim fin anode (it stayed in the garage). :eek: More gas.

    The boat performed better than any expectations that I might have had. I felt that I had built the hull too heavy was concerned that it would have any usable capacity or have any performance at all. Sometimes, I felt that the sole reason for completing the build was to get out from under the chain of a major unfinished project, regardless of it's suitablity as a boat. :( I still belive that it is a bit heavy for it's size, but performance is very acceptable. I guess I'm keep it for a while.

    We thought our christening day was going to end before it ever started. Our original plan was to put in on the local creek that is part of the Erie canal system. This would involve motoring for a fair amount before exiting onto the Niagara River. I was comforable with this as a buddy was going to give chase and provide assistance if needed to get us off of the river. Stuff happens and plans change and the dunk was now going to happen on a weekday in the afternoon; no buddy, no chase boat. Nix the river. We headed to the Buffalo Small Boat Harbour. Arriving there, we are amazed at how glorious the day is. High clouds, very light winds and glassy water. Approaching the entry gate, I see that there are no attendants. Cool, free launch. Further in we see the launch ramp. Barricaded! Closed for the season. Unbelievable.

    Considering our options, we head south for the other harbour hoping something there will be open. Long story short, more closed ramps, but one ramp that is left open through the winter for fishermen. Yeah! We will not go bust today. Launch was quick and uneventful.

    We did some motoring in the harbour to get comfortable with the feel of the boat. I felt reasonable sure the it wasn't going to die on us, so we headed for open water. Once past all of the NO WAKE signs, I started opening the throttle, bit by bit. It climbed up on plane easily and relatively quickly. We did 10 MPH, then 15, then 20. Before proceeding, I did some moderate speed turns between 10 and 20. Nothing unusual and the boat felt very responsive. The steering is a bit heavy and don't anticipate being able to change it. Putting it back straight, I started pushing the throttle more and more to see what the top end was going to be. My tach only goes to 6000 RPM and it was indicating about 6500 RPM. I'm not sure of the normal range of this motor. My tach may be giving erroneous indications or it really is turning 6500 RPM. It's a two stroke so it's not out of the realm of possibilities. Our speed kept climbing until the GPS indicated 26 MPH. I believe I had switched it to read MPH by now because I wanted to compare it to my speedometer indications. 26 was acceptable in my book considering my provious statements. Joyride one complete.

    Headed in and changed passengers. First ride: my wife and I in the front wide the small daughter in the middle seat. Less then four hundred pounds of pax. Second ride: In-laws in the very back and myself and daughter in the front seat. Estimating 650 pounds of people. Go out, give it a hole shot and she climbs out like a champ. I also notice that I have a bit of reserve power at the top of my lever travel. It doesn't stay up, but if you hold you up there, there is definitely more top end. I'm assuming it's a cable adjustment. With this load and weight distribution and the extra power, I clock 28 MPH on the GPS. Very nice. Afterwards, my father-in-law expresses good things all around. He's had boats most of his life and says he thinks I've got a good strong motor. He also likes the way climbs out and gets on plane so quickly. One more trip in to get the wife and send the in-laws on their way.

    It's wifies turn to take the wheel. We head out again and I do some short videos. Hopefully, I can downsize them and post a couple. I have her open it up again and have her hold the power in. We finally hit 29 MPH on the GPS. Better than I ever imagined. The speedometer is even indicating the same. Another functional system. We back off of the power and motor around for about another hour, exploring our new found freedom.

    I haven't established trust in the fuel indicating system, yet. I put in six gallons and it didn't register a quarter tank on an 18 gallon tank. I may need to research a way to bring it in line. Fortunately, the tank is translucent and we are able to give it a visual inspection too. We decide it's time to head in, but have to do one of two more donuts before heading into the harbour. Once in the harbour, the engine sputters and dies. Argh! Crank, nothing. Crank, nothing. Choke, crank, varoom, nothing. I check the tank. Yup, it's pretty much empty. We have no back up and we aren't near the shore or the docks. The tank pick-up is on the left-side of the tank, so I give the command, "Everyone slide left." Crank, crank, crank. Nothing. :idea: I squeeze the primer bulb and "Yes!" There is fuel and I can feel it going into the carburetors! So, we made it back to the dock by sitting on the left side of the boat, staying close to the docks and squeezing the primer bulb to keep fuel going to the engine. :D:D:D:D Motoring Boating 101, complete.

    Thats all for now. More thoughts, speculations and confessions tomorrow.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2012
  14. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Video

    Here is a quick video climbing on plane.

    You'll have to excuse my tinkering with Windows Movie Maker.
     

    Attached Files:


  15. Dave T
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    Location: Anamosa Iowa and North Buena Vista on the Mississi

    Dave T Senior Member

    Nice Boat

    Enjoyed reading your post and I'd like to congratulate you on a great job! I really like to see when people finally make maiden voyage on a homemade boat. It makes all the work and problems worthwhile. If you haven't already take a look at my thread [a boat a motor and a trailer]. I'm not sure which is the best part of building a boat starting the project or finishing it. I know the worst part is when you have to pull it out of the water for the last time and it's going to be a long cold winter. What is your estimate of what the boat weighs with all equipment without passengers?


    Great Job!
    Dave T :):)
     
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