Putting it all together.

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by LP, Jan 7, 2007.

  1. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    I'm in the final phases of putting together an 18' mahogany runabout. I've taken an Edwin Monk design and stretched it a bit made some other changes (splashwell, constant deadrise). Hopefully, of no detriment to the design. Anyway, I'm trying to incorporate modern systems and materials where they are applicable, so this thread is going to be a line of questioning in regard to proper installation of systems and possibly what is current industry standard.

    My first line of questions is about proper windshield materials. I would like to stay away from any plastics as the suffer from UV degradation and abuse(scratches, chemicals, etc.) I was thinking of using automotive safety glass, but would like to explore other options.

    The windshield frame is a split V'ed shape with side windows. The glass panels are aproximately 22" by 16".
     

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  2. longliner45
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    longliner45 Senior Member

    nice boat,,,how about lexan windows?
     
  3. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Safety glass is used in cars but it is not automotive. It is also used in windows, industrial and others. Laminated glass works better, because in the event it breaks, the pieces stay somewhat attached together.
     
  4. Raggi_Thor
    Joined: Jan 2004
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    Raggi_Thor Nav.arch/Designer/Builder

    Acrylic(?) or Polycarbonate, Lexan®, is lighter than glass if weight is important. I think laminated glass looks better.

    Beautiful boat, can we see some more?
     
  5. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    LP Flying Boatman

    Lexan would be my first choice in plastics. I like the look of real glass, but I think I'll be paying a weight penalty. In searching other threads, it looks like tempered glass is strongest, but it's probably folly to use in a non-laminated form. Thoughts? Glass forward and Lexan sides?

    The back glass in my '95 Bronco have been busted twice. It's non-laminated and shatters into a million pieces. No big and dangerous pieces though. Would that mean it's safety glass? tempered glass? ??

    Here are some pics before the windshield frame. Pardon the mess. I barely have time to work on the boat, let alone, clean up afterwards.

    scroll down to the bottom.

    http://boatdesign.net/forums/showthread.php?p=116667#post116667
     
  6. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Tempered glass breaks into little pieces. Safety glass has a plastic or metal mesh in between the laminates. Car windhsields have two laminates. They can be made with as many layers as you want.
     
  7. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    LP Flying Boatman

    More stuff

    I found a source for 1/8" safety glass. I was afraid I'd end up with something a 1/4" thick.

    Several more items to query.

    Steering wheel issues. I've pretty much been planning to go with the standard right- er... starboard wheel. Some of the old woodies have them port-side. If I use a modern coaming mount power quadrant, does that lock me into a starboard-side steering wheel?

    I just got my fuel tank today so I'm looking at resolving it's issues. I'm looking at putting the filler on the aft port deck. I'm curious about the best location for the tank vent. Should it be on a vertical surface? on the side (outside obviously) of the boat or could it be located in the splash well?

    I'll be using a stern light on a removable pole. It makes sense to keep it away from the fuel filler port so I'm looking at a starboard mount. Does it matter which side if the boat the stern light is on? This light omni-directional. Does there need to be a stern "nav" light that is restricted to being viewed only from behind the boat?
     
  8. tom28571
    Joined: Dec 2001
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    Normally both side and rear windows on cars are tempered glass. Side windows seldom shatter but rear windows can shatter just sitting in the sun or from minor impacts. Side windows are not constrained are just fairly loose in their mountings while rear windows are mounted much like windshields.

    moral: If tempered glass is mounted is such a way that it can be subjected to any stress, it can shatter easily. Which way will you windshield be mounted? In the same situation I have always chosen either safety plate glass or Lexan. Not a glass expert but the above reasoning seems sensible to me and I would not use tempered glass in a windshield..
     
  9. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    IT is doubtful that a boat of this style would get green water breaking over the deck , so light and thin will be fine. The auto safety glass (if flat) is easy to get and fairly cheap.

    Glass MUST be used if a windshield wiper is used as the blade destroys plastic rapidly.

    I believe the choices made between P or S helm was due to propeller rotation , they always wanted the driver on the side that lifted from propeller torque.

    In addition many inboards would also have the shaft a few degrees offset to have the rudder centered at speed.

    FF
     
  10. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    LP Flying Boatman

    EEKS!!! I can't believe I started this thread five years ago. Well I finally bought some glass. I had the windows made up from 3/16" safety glass. I bought some mahogany colored 5200, but wanted to get advise on the best produst for setting the glass into a wood/epoxy frame. I pulled up this thread.

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/all-things-boats-and-boating/window-bedding-sealing-25106.html

    Sounds like a polyether is the right product. Sikaflex was ultimately used in this thread. I should know what 5200 is, but can someone tell this lay-man what it is and what the right product will be?
     
  11. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Laminated glass is the proper choice for windshields, not tempered. Side windows are okay for tempered, but I use laminated (safety) glass for all, just because of the strength.

    Glass, unlike the plastics, is easy to seal in. 3M-5200 is a polyurethane and works fairly well, though repairs will likely damage the frame upon removal. I prefer a less aggressive goo, such as polysulphide (3M-101) or 3M 4000 UV (polyether), which can be removed without damaging the wooden frame. Sikaflex 292 (a polyurethane) is less aggressive than 3M-5200 and is a common choice as well. 3M 4000 UV would be my recommendation and heavily seal the window frame with epoxy, before application.

    How much farther along on this project are you? Basically, I'm asking for more pictures . . .
     
  12. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    LP Flying Boatman

    Thanks for the reply, Paul. I can never remember which goo goes where. :eek:

    I will mask off the frame and build up the epoxy layers even further. I have some maintenance to do on the boat from it living under tarps for two summers and a winter. Maintenance! :rolleyes: I haven't even finished the thing. This should prompt me to start mixing the stuff up. It's hard to get into glue mode when you've been out of it for a while.

    It seems like everything has broke loose on this project. It was standing by primarily for higher dollar items and my distraction with kayaks and other maintenance :rolleyes: projects. The glass for the windshield is purchased. Most of the wiring components are available and ready to install if they aren't already. Upholstery fabric is purchased, waiting for install. I don't like my attempts here and may hire it out. The battery was purchased. I was holding back on this because I didn't want a battery sitting around for an indefinite period not being used. In a nutshell(inside the boat): electrics, glass, upholstery, sole finish, fuel system(also waiting for install) and engine work are what needs to be done before she gets dunked. Outside the boat, she needs trim and hardware installed. The time under the tarps wasn't kind to her and I have some areas of interest that I'm deciding whether to live with them or repair them.

    My work is cut out for me. This was going to be last winter's project, then it was going to be this winter's project and now, surprisingly, it is THE project and moving alone incredibly. If I get the electrics and the engine sorted out, she may get dunked before the snow flys (((shiver))).

    The motor is a big question mark. I happened across it on Craigslist for $40 dollars and the guy said it ran when it came off of the boat. He also gave me an extra prop that looks new so the price was right. I have to be careful about how much I invest in the thing before knowing if it's going to run or not.

    I'll get some pictures posted. I'm glad your interested.
     
  13. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Still putting it all together.

    Some photos.

    IMG_1741.JPG
    View looking aft. Battery box visible under rear seat. Side soles not in place.
    IMG_1744.JPG
    Looking forward.
    IMG_1739.JPG
    Close up of gauges.
    IMG_1740.JPG
    Aft quarter section. Stainless panels will be buffed out.
    IMG_1746 (1024x765).jpg
    Forward quarter. I have stainless panels that will cover topsides just inside of the painted areas.
    IMG_1747 (1024x765).jpg
    Bow.
     
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  14. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Don't you find Sikaflex goes moldy?
     

  15. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    I've not used it before and my boats like to live indoors when they're not being used.
     
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