Pultruded carbon

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by BobH, Oct 23, 2015.

  1. BobH
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: Pendleton, OR

    BobH Junior Member

  2. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: New Orleans

    Stumble Senior Member

    I am not sure what the advantage over uni would be, and there are some real downsides. Pultruded rods are commonly used for battens, but I can't think of anything else.
     
  3. BobH
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: Pendleton, OR

    BobH Junior Member

    Flat strips, not rods

    I understand that when used correctly pultruded strips have a much greater strength in both tension and compression compared to hand layup of uni. (far less kinking of fibers) That is the reason for my interest. I would like to know if anyone has tried them in various applications and discovered limitations or difficulties in their use.

    One of their virtues is a consistency of strength (assuming a quality source)...helpful when engineering a structure. I understand there are issues of strength related to building them into a composite due to variations in surface treatments, strength of the matrix they are embedded in, etc., but at least as a single component their behavior is more reliable.
     
  4. groper
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    Location: australia

    groper Senior Member

    They are extensively used in spar construction - mainly wing spars of aircraft, from commercial to homebuilt aircraft. Its terrific stuff, the mechanical properties they are achieving with it nowdays is incredible. Incorporating it into any spar type structure on a boat would be no different to a wing spar. So if you wanted to, you could certainly make good use of it by incorporating it into;
    Masts and booms, connective beams on multihulls, mast step supporting bulkheads, foils and rudders, chainplates etc.

    Stripping an entire hull with it would be extremely expensive and probably not worth considering, the hull skins on most all yachts and boats are a deflection driven design problem, not a strength problem. The most efficeint way of dealing with deflection is via thickness so its use in a hull isnt really useful or necessary...
     

  5. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Pultruded Uni's have great strength and stiffeness in one direction.
    But you need to get that strength into other structure or it does little good in most structure.
    I.E., you have to translate the strength via shear into the surrounding structure. That's hard to do because there is so little surface area as a transfer surface.
     
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