Pulling Lines off an Already Existing Hull/Mold

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by bobby_mcgrath, Dec 5, 2006.

  1. bobby_mcgrath
    Joined: Jun 2005
    Posts: 17
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    Location: Newfoundland, Canada

    bobby_mcgrath Junior Member

    Hello All,

    I've got a question about taking lines off of a hull. I am undergoing a project to do some re-design of a 28' pleasure craft. I want to develope some lines with Rhino, but there are no original lines/offsets. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to physically pull lines off of a physical hull or mold. Any suggestions would be awesom. Thanks for reading

    Bob McGrath
     
  2. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    Use the Search function on this forum. This topic comes up a lot and many solutions have already been discussed
    The biggest issue is not technical, it's whether you have the legal rights to do this. If you don't, it's a moot point.
     
  3. bobby_mcgrath
    Joined: Jun 2005
    Posts: 17
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    Location: Newfoundland, Canada

    bobby_mcgrath Junior Member

    Thanks for the quick reply. I am going to bo contracted to do this work for the hull/mold owner, so I iwll be in the clear copyright wise. Just reading over the postss now. Will post again if I have mor questions.

    Bob
     
  4. JPG Designs
    Joined: Nov 2006
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    Location: USA - Gulf Coast

    JPG Designs Pieces and Parts

    Bobby,

    You could use a laser scanner to get a point cloud, You could use a Total Station to "shoot points" to a prisom placed at each point, You could get a CMM Arm and "pick" each point directly, You could layout "painters tape" at the stations and measure from datum lines parrellel to CL and BL or use a laser "chalk line" insead of tape.

    Or build a machine that runs on a track parrellel to CL with a laser pointer that has adjustable "waterline". Lets say you start from the bow... set to machine at the bow using the laser to locate forward most point. Mark the track or the floor. Move the machine down the track to the first station clamp to track. Adjust height of laser for each point and measure "waterline" from floor to laser and then from machine to hull at laser point, record measurements, then input into Rhino. Kind of time consuming, but I don't have about $100k laying around for a laser scanner. :( :( :( (If I had the 100K I wouldn't be scanning hulls.;)

    JPG
     
  5. jsh
    Joined: Sep 2003
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    Location: vancouver

    jsh Junior Member

    bobby:

    I just finished this process on my own project and I used the method outlined by John Gardener in "wooden boats to build and use"
    I used the triangulation method and it worked very well.

    john
     

  6. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    http://www.loc.gov/folklife/maritime/linesb2.html
    Techniques are discussed by John Gardner in his articles "Taking Lines Off Bigger Boats," "Taking Off Lines Allows Duplication of Existing Boats," and "Triangulation Method is Well Suited to Lifting Lines," by Walter J. Simmons in his book Lines, Lofting and Half Models

    Gardner, John. "Taking Lines Off Bigger Boats." National Fisherman 67, no.1 (May 1986): 58.

    _______. "Taking Off Lines Allows Duplication of Existing Boats." National Fisherman 66, no. 12 (April 1986): 44-5.

    _______. "Triangulation Method is Well Suited to Lifting Lines." National Fisherman 67, no. 4 (August 1986): 65-67.
     
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