Pulleys for Cable Steering system

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Dhutch, Feb 9, 2012.

  1. Dhutch
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: Cheshire UK

    Dhutch Junior Member

    We have used u-clamps, doubled up and very tight, inplace of splices a i draw the line at splicing 3strand, so assuming its these that are causing the slippage its only a 5min job to wind the turn bucket out again, take the slack up in a end, and re-tension.

    Hear what your saying frosty, but we boat for the fun of boating, a lot of which (bar running the steam engine) is the fun of stearing it, and a mechanical system just feels nicer, Ive done it, ive tried boat, considered the options, and that what ive gone with. A chain and rod system would be nice, and maybe thats what i'll do next, but in the mean this allows me to reused the quatrent and get it fitted in a weekend and a half which is the time I had on at the boat to get it done!

    Slightly slacker than ideal, it does now work, and we have done our first 8 days boating succesfully.

    Daniel
     
  2. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    [​IMG] I wondered what this is. I'm guessing a generator running off the propeller shaft? Is it from a car? How many volts do cars run on there?
     
  3. Dhutch
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: Cheshire UK

    Dhutch Junior Member

    We're going slightly (?) of topic so I will PM you, but yes, its an alternator driven of the propshaft to charge the batteries as the boat is steam powered, no gearbox/clutch and very slow revving.
     
  4. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: New Orleans

    Stumble Senior Member

    Daniel,

    You really need to splice the eyes. The u-clamps will massively weaken the line, and as slippery as dyneema is will likely slip under load no matter how much you tighten them. If you can spice three strand, trust me splicing dyneema will be the easiest thing you have ever done.

    It is not a woven splice like three strand, or plaited rope, it is a bury splice. So you just take the working end and slide it inside the standing end. Taper it and the lock stitch the point of the bury. It really takes less than five minutes to do right once you get the pattern down.

    Alternatively you can do what's called a modified brummel, which is slightly more complicated (it takes me about 10 minutes), but it doesn't require the lock stitch, though I would still add it.

    Splicing instructions for the modified brummel - http://www.colligomarine.com/docs/misc/splicing_instructions_for_web_rev_1_2.pdf

    Splicing instructions for lockstitch taper (all 5 steps) - http://www.samsonrope.com/site_files/12S_C2_EyeSpl.pdf
     
  5. Dhutch
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: Cheshire UK

    Dhutch Junior Member

    Well, we'll see how it goes. But thankyou for the links, as I will have a bit of a practice on some other rope.

    Presumably the fid is a requirment rather than a niceity, i have one for fender making (ended up on a days coarse a freind was running) but it dont think its suitable. Anything in partialar im looking for?


    Daniel
     

  6. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: New Orleans

    Stumble Senior Member

    Fids aren't really required. I use a wire hanger and a screw driver most of the time. Or whatever I happen to have handy. I have done dyneema splices with a dowel, ball point pen, crochet needle, just whatever is handy. As I mentioned this is a rediculously easy splice to do.

    I refuse to do three stand or plaited spices, but 12 strand is a joke. Once you start with it, you will likely get addicted to the line.
     
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