Project F10

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by WerpKerp, Sep 23, 2019.

  1. WerpKerp
    Joined: Mar 2018
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    Location: Long Island, New York

    WerpKerp Junior Member

    You might remember that a few months ago I started a thread here on BDN titled
    "RC 1/5 Scale AC50 Foiling Catamaran"
    I now have the time to properly give this a shot, and I've chosen to build a 1/5 scale SailGP F50, which will be 10ft long, hence the name F10. I will be sailing this beast on the waters of Oyster Bay, and I have found suitable launching facilities, and I will have the use of a chase boat while sailing this. I wish to cast this model from carbon fiber, and I want to mold the foils also out of CF. I want to use UpTiP foils or wand-controlled foils. Any suggestions, advice, or criticism is welcome. Thanks.
     
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  2. Doug Halsey
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    Doug Halsey Senior Member

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  3. WerpKerp
    Joined: Mar 2018
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    Location: Long Island, New York

    WerpKerp Junior Member

    What system should I use to control the ride height of the foils, and how should I raise and lower them?
     
  4. Doug Halsey
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    Doug Halsey Senior Member

    I'm sure you'll find a lot of difference of opinions about that. Can you plan your construction to be compatible with different alternatives?
     
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  5. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    Electronic would be ideal but not yet as effective as surface wands it seems.
    I agree with Doug Halsey, make it interchangable for trial and error.
    Every craft responds differently, once you have a system in place you can experiment with different set-ups.
     
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  6. WerpKerp
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    Location: Long Island, New York

    WerpKerp Junior Member

    I will plan the F10 to be able to use different ride height systems. Speaking of construction, should I build the hulls out of fiberglass or CF, and how should I build the wingsail?
     
  7. WerpKerp
    Joined: Mar 2018
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    Location: Long Island, New York

    WerpKerp Junior Member

    Also, these are the goals of the F10 project as a whole
    -To be faster around a racecourse than a Club 420
    -To be able to foil upwind and downwind
    -To be able to foil tack and gybe.
     
  8. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    epoxy-fiber unless you're wealthy and can afford to experiment and fail using cf.
     
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  9. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    "Aim high, there's lots of room!"
    You go man!
     
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  10. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    I'd build your model in carbon fibre if you can afford it, it's stiffer for a given weight and you want that in a foiler as platform twist will cause problems with your foil alignments. You can always take weight off but any you build into your structure can't be easily removed. Crossbeams could be simple carbon fibre tubes with a decorative fairing. The manufactured ones are cheap and light. I find the roll wrapped ones to be preferable to pultruded types and have adequate material properties for this application.
     
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  11. WerpKerp
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    Location: Long Island, New York

    WerpKerp Junior Member

  12. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    Twill type weave should be ok on a smallish model so this is about 10' long not wildly different to a 2 metre multihull. I settled on two layers of 200gsm twill on my 2 metre model and when I put together some trial hulls from my molds they were fine. You might want to add an additional layer on a 10' model. The lighter everything is the less strong it has to be.
     
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  13. WerpKerp
    Joined: Mar 2018
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    Location: Long Island, New York

    WerpKerp Junior Member

    What are the benefits of different foil shapes, i.e. traditional L-boards, UpTiP, or a J-Board? And what are the benefits of say, a electronic foil control system versus a wand-controlled one? Thanks.
     
  14. WerpKerp
    Joined: Mar 2018
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    Location: Long Island, New York

    WerpKerp Junior Member

    And how can I mold the blades?
     

  15. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    Doug Lord or Ian Holt on here might be able to advise you on that. I built my non lifting daggerboard out of a couple of layers of 300 gsm carbon uni with some carbon biax at 45/45 that I had lying around, you might need to get fancier than that on a lifting board boat of the size you are proposing. For sure they will be one of the most complicated parts of the build much as they are on the full sized examples.
     
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