Progressive Flooding

Discussion in 'Stability' started by Leopard, Nov 22, 2021.

  1. Leopard
    Joined: Nov 2021
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    Likes: 2, Points: 3
    Location: Belgium

    Leopard Junior Member

    The vessel was built before the approval of damage stability from the class. The engine room compartment was bigger, it required additional bulkhead to meet criteria.
     
  2. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: Japan

    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    That is nothing unusual.
    The preliminary stability will always be completed before the vessel is built.

    So the person who did the stability book did or did not follow the submitted deck and profiles indicating where the WTBs are?
    If they did follow, and then it was subsequently changed - after - that is the fault of the person doing such and indicates a significant lack of any QA in the shipyard too.
     
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  3. Leopard
    Joined: Nov 2021
    Posts: 27
    Likes: 2, Points: 3
    Location: Belgium

    Leopard Junior Member


    The designer submitted the stability booklet and it got some comments. Then he realized it had some problems like compartment issues. But vessel was built enough by this time.
     
  4. Leopard
    Joined: Nov 2021
    Posts: 27
    Likes: 2, Points: 3
    Location: Belgium

    Leopard Junior Member

    You said it's not unusual. How do they tackle the situation such a case? Is there any wayout?
     
  5. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    If the designer submitted the booklet and got comments to correct it, he should finish the job. In general, the person contracted for any project is responsible for its completion. Is the designer not willing to correct the errors? Also, you should check the contract and verify if the designer is responsible for cost overruns caused by his mistakes. The designer will probably have an "errors and omissions" insurance policy to cover those costs.
     
  6. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: Japan

    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    2 issues here:-

    1 - the person doing the stability book, either doesn't know the rules very well, or doing this type of work is beyond them. Since the purpose of the doing the preliminary stability book, is not just to demonstrate compliance, at an early stage, but identified where it does not, so changes can be made and corrected before the vessel is completed.

    2 - Seems Class/Flag have taken far too long to review the booklet.
    Maybe it is BV?.... i had a simple 26m stability booklet take 14 months for its approval BV... shockingly slow.

    As noted, the purpose of the prelim booklet is to identify if the vessel, if built to the deisgn at hand, complies or not. And if not, provide mitigation.
    If none of this was done and/or understand, there are seriously failings within the shipyard.

    The remedy is to change the design/layout so it DOES comply.
    Simple!
     
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  7. Leopard
    Joined: Nov 2021
    Posts: 27
    Likes: 2, Points: 3
    Location: Belgium

    Leopard Junior Member

    Yeah It's BV.
     
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