Professional BoatBuilder article: Foiling Outboard-Powered Catamaran

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by ProBoat, Mar 30, 2020.

  1. ProBoat
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    ProBoat Junior Member

    PBB editor-at-large Dieter Loibner’s report on Jan Brandt, his nascent company Matanzas Watercraft, and his cruising power catamaran with foil-assisted planing hulls and wave-piercing bows, the Matanzas 29. With design and engineering assistance from foiling experts Bieker Boats (biekerboats.com) of Anacortes, Washington, Brandt aims to deliver a projected 5-gph (19-lph) fuel consumption rate at a 20-knot cruising speed--a very practical compromise between efficient displacement monohulls of that size running at 10 knots and the current market trend of powering 35’ (10.7m) center consoles with triple 300-hp outboards. The Efficiency of a Foiling Powercat - Professional BoatBuilder Magazine https://bit.ly/2J6FZoF
     
    Niclas Vestman and bajansailor like this.
  2. Niclas Vestman
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    Niclas Vestman Senior Member

    Wow! Awesome project. Thanks for a very interesting link!
     
  3. ProBoat
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    ProBoat Junior Member

    To All, Sorry for the initial posting in the wrong forum. Thanks for moving it to the proper place. To Niclas Vestman, you're welcome! Glad you enjoyed it.
     
  4. Russell Brown
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    Russell Brown Senior Member

    I just got to check out the lifting foils yesterday. They are quite beautiful and don't weigh much.
     
  5. ziper1221
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    ziper1221 Junior Member

    Uhh, I'm not real sure about that part. The rest certainly looks interesting. I wonder if there is any provisions for a controlled breakaway in case of a foil strike. Those rear foils could probably put a several hundred pounds of load on that lower unit, will there be any complications with that much force on a 90 hp unit? Any ideas why the foils were built solid forward, foam aft instead of a more typical sandwich?
     
  6. ProBoat
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    ProBoat Junior Member

    I've passed your questions on to the author of the article... answers to come.
     
  7. Russell Brown
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    Russell Brown Senior Member

    Everything in boat design is a compromise. Most boats don't like hitting things at high speeds, but lots of high speed boats have things like daggerboards and rudders that don't kick up. Now lots of high speed boats have hydrofoils and sometimes they break when hitting things. In this case, breaking a foil only means a slower trip home. That's how it seems to me anyway.
     
  8. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    No doubt about it, the best way to travel in the water, is to travel out of it. The flying-fish discovered that a while ago !
     
  9. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    What would happen if one foil sheared off through a collision with foreign objects, besides a sudden change in heading, I guess it isn't going fast enough to create a rotating force from the side still intact, that could roll the boat. I think I prefer foils inside the tunnel.
     
  10. ziper1221
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    ziper1221 Junior Member

    For sure, but it seems like some kind of shear pin arrangement could save a lot of damage.
     
  11. Niclas Vestman
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    Niclas Vestman Senior Member

    My only objection is cabin- and decksides (upper freeboard) design. Love all the rest of it. And I really get the design for market SOR. But in that case, design all of it for market. Sorry but the top sides/cabin are hideous. Actually remarkably similar to the fantastic but equally querky Gougeon 32. Looks like a motorboat version of it. Good as in an amazing boat and concept idea. Bad as in an uggly duckling design. Should be possible to make a redesign that has much more market potential.
     
  12. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

  13. Russell Brown
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    Russell Brown Senior Member

    Brian, I read your critique of this design and I agree with a bit of it, but why would you criticize such a forward-thinking boat that was designed by people that know one hell of a lot about all of the compromises inherent in this kind of boat. This is a boat that is actually being built and will soon be tested, so what is the purpose of listing your concerns? Does it make you feel better somehow to dump on someone's best effort? If you feel strongly about this kind of boat, then make one happen. I won't criticize it.
     
  14. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Any foils on a fishing boat, especially projecting out and down like these, are a bit of a hazard for fouling lines, guaranteed to cut you off when that big trophy fish takes a run as you try and bring it to gaff.
     

  15. Niclas Vestman
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    Niclas Vestman Senior Member

    Because constructive critisism is about the best you can give anyone. In my opinion, if not directly rude, it is actually generous and shows interest and that someone cares.

    Also the article mentioned it was a prototype build in a manner so that changes in the design can be made. Meaning no 100% finished design with molds. But rather a one of, in a slightly "economical" build. So the critique/suggestions I find are very appropriate.
     
    BlueBell likes this.
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