Proa sailing for beginners?

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Paul D, Aug 1, 2018.

  1. Paul D
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: New Zealand

    Paul D Junior Member

    Hello people...
    Wondering if a proa sail boat is allright for learning how to sail?...im interested in building a small sailboat out of plywood and have come across the proa design mainly like it because on some designs you can use the canoe by itself without the outriggers ....thought they look simple to build and see they can take small outboard on the outrigger arm...

    Would like to fish off it as well eventually..
    But main question is would they suit a beginner?
    Any other suggestions much appreciated...thanks
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2018
  2. Corley
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

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  3. Paul D
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: New Zealand

    Paul D Junior Member

    Thanks Corley ive been looking at storers designs aswell as Dierking designs from nz his are all proa designs i think...
    Im know expert but just from the little research ive done a proa needs to be shunted? to tack and that maybe bit complicated for a newbie like me...
    Im just looking for simple design to give me more experience in stitch and glue technique before i go on to a bigger project ive made a simple flat bottom punt...but thought a sailing canoe that can be motored and have outriggers attached would be a handy boat to have and be stored away easily....
    Anyway thanks much appreciated
     
  4. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

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  5. Paul D
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: New Zealand

    Paul D Junior Member

    Thanks for the article joseph...i like the traditional side of the proa they play a big part in our ancestral history here in new zealand...
    I would be looking at a 16ft design not sure if many people sail them down where i am....

    Would they be hard to learn to sail on?
    Thanks
     
  6. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    The alternative to a proa is a tacking outrigger which is sailed as a normal sailing craft and tacked rather than shunted. Personally I think the safety thing is way overplayed for a low buoyancy float trimaran like the storer type with a moderate sail area which is extremely hard to capsize if the boat is equipped with a moderate sail area.
     
  7. Paul D
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: New Zealand

    Paul D Junior Member

    Yea ive just noticed Dierkings designs have a tacking outrigger setup to for some of his boats which could be an option aswell as Storers designs...
    I thought if i carry a small 2hp OB on the outrigger arm i could cheat now and then when it comes to the tack lol...
    OB be good for a backup just incase ....
    Storers outrigger setup apparently suits most canoes and kayaks and looks cheap to build so could be adapted to a design i decide to build...thanks for the advice
     
  8. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Yes they're easy to sail. Watch some YouTube vids and take your boat out on a calmer day for starters (5 to 10kts wind) to build up your sailing skills. Also suggest bringing a skilled sailor with you to "show you the ropes". Here's a nice 16ft proa.

    Tarawa, a proa for one. http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/garyd/tarawa.html

    One note about your location: Kiwi land (NZ) can offer up some challenging seas. Be absolutely sure each day you sail you check the daily wind & weather forecast. Never venture out without a good sailing forecast, which I would put at 5-20kt winds. Anything over that and you won't be able to do much fishing and you'll have your hands full. These boats do better in lower latitudes of the Polynesian islands in the South Pacific, which offer up these smoother sailing conditions. So long as your honor and respect Mother Nature you'll be in good shape.
     
  9. Paul D
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: New Zealand

    Paul D Junior Member

    Thanks for the advice Joseph i will take it on board...
    They have a sailing club not far from me in a place called Pounawea so hoping to get a couple of needed lessons ....
    The tarawa design looks good ...
    ... maybe where i am way down the bottom of NZ a proa design may not be desirable like u say more suited to warmer calmer regions although i would only be out in suitable weather so maybe a good wetsuit in winter time be needed cause im guessing they be a bit wet at 16ft?......
    Thanks for your time tho mate ..
     
  10. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Oh boy southern New Zealand. You're kissing the Southern Ocean. Unless you're sailing in a protected bay or large river/estuary I would reconsider. If you venture offshore you'll definitely want a larger, more seaworthy vessel.
     

  11. Paul D
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: New Zealand

    Paul D Junior Member

    At Pounawea sailing club its an estruary and theres lakes i can go to aswell etc ... id need alot of experience to venture out to sea in a sailing boat or any boat that is ...
    I thought a proa design that i could use the canoe seperatly to paddle with my kids maybe small outboard in a well?..and with the advantage of adding an outrigger to learn how to sail would be a useful fun boat....but fishing a couple kms offshore in it was an after thought i know people kayak fish down South here on good days so would think a well designed canoe with outrigger and back up outboard would be safer than a kayak may be wrong tho...cherz
     
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