preparation of interior rust on steel hull

Discussion in 'Metal Boat Building' started by owensp, Oct 26, 2010.

  1. War Whoop
    Joined: Jun 2003
    Posts: 661
    Likes: 16, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 84
    Location: Sunny Ft Lauderdale Fla

    War Whoop Senior Member

    Down here we have been using Ospho straight out of the bottle,once the loose rust is removed, scrub a wet coat in with a scuff pad and allow 24 hours for it to dry.
     
  2. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Seems "out of the bottle" is the way you like to address a problem. And please, what have YOU to do with restoring old steel structures?

    Get your big mouth shut, amateur. Race your boats, build them, as you can, but stay away from real world experience on the open oceans. And especially from old steel boats.

    (I know you will not like it, but it was not thought so)

    Regards
    Richard
     
  3. War Whoop
    Joined: Jun 2003
    Posts: 661
    Likes: 16, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 84
    Location: Sunny Ft Lauderdale Fla

    War Whoop Senior Member


    As I can !!!!!!! That would be light years ahead of you!

    LOL Rich Ole boy my stuff has to run in two mediums Air and Water Both not slog around in "Boat Mode" until it sinks like Apex junkers. BTW I do not Drink,Smoke and never have done drugs,now you my friend seem a little touchy ,can you make the same claim?

    Now for the old steel structures ,Part of my family's business is restoring classic cars.
     
  4. Steve W
    Joined: Jul 2004
    Posts: 1,824
    Likes: 63, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 608
    Location: Duluth, Minnesota

    Steve W Senior Member

    Anybody used the POR15 products for this purpose? I am not claiming any expertise or knowledge with these products, just asking.
    Steve.
     
  5. War Whoop
    Joined: Jun 2003
    Posts: 661
    Likes: 16, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 84
    Location: Sunny Ft Lauderdale Fla

    War Whoop Senior Member

    Owens Sorry about the poor manners represented here in your thread.
     
  6. War Whoop
    Joined: Jun 2003
    Posts: 661
    Likes: 16, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 84
    Location: Sunny Ft Lauderdale Fla

    War Whoop Senior Member


    I had some guys that maintained road salt trucks,I think they said they used that material.
     
  7. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    See where you fail?

    We went to sea before you did know there was water.

    And I restored more than 3000 tonnes of old steam boats. (most likely before YOU ever noticed they were there? )

    Dude,
    you are not bad in your game, racing, but do not try to play in my league, building at the highest level. No, no, not raceboats, cruisers.

    Richard
     
  8. War Whoop
    Joined: Jun 2003
    Posts: 661
    Likes: 16, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 84
    Location: Sunny Ft Lauderdale Fla

    War Whoop Senior Member

    Not true I grew up on the water.
    No I love old ships and respect them.



    No I design real cool things and I only need to build @ 18 Meters max, but that may change.
     
  9. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Cool is a term, not a value.

    Although I can understand that you have the ability to race and build competitive boats, I fear, you have a lack of capability in communications.

    That may be a value for some, it is not for me. But, do me a favour please, before you question my products, make sure you know what you are talking about.
    Don´t get me wrong, I will never accept your behaviour, no matter what happens.

    My roots are too deeply connected to the olde warriors of the crusades.

    I never be questioned by newbies, just because they are what they are. (what does not make my statements better than they are, but not worse either)
    Richard
     
  10. NZ_Shipwright
    Joined: Sep 2010
    Posts: 19
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 37
    Location: Auckland

    NZ_Shipwright Junior Member

    Hi, I have not used POR15 . Cant beat the tried and true method. I have been working on commercial workboats for sometime now and there is nothing easy about rust work. I wish someone would come up with a magic potion.
     
  11. MikeJohns
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 3,192
    Likes: 208, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 2054
    Location: Australia

    MikeJohns Senior Member

    A needle gun to remove all the scale and then grind the surface lightly and then wire cup brush . Weld up any deep pits if there's only a few of them. You can also use a disc sander quite effectively you might want a die grinder to get into awkward spots and a few punches to hammer scale out of interior corners. But a random needle gun or an air chisel usually does this quite well.

    Needle guns should be good quality professional air tools and driven by a compressor than can keep it running at full bore. They are much better if they are 'random needle' rather than all pushing together.

    I don't like the phosphoric acids. I think they just complicate things and they have to be thoroughly washed. So you are just chemically washing what you could remove with mechanical means more effectively. (And thats the Aust. standards view too)

    If you drove all the moisture out with a heat gun and sealed the surface the rust powder is inert anyway it's bugbear is that it absorbs and traps moisture.



    As for interior paint use a galv rich primer, we use some good chlorinated rubber based zinc undercoats that penetrate very well and dry in half an hour. Cover with a decent layer of epoxy. From experience, follow up maybe a year later and re do a few spots that are obvious.

    for my 10c
    Don't use the phosphoric acid. Don't wash with water keep everything dry and warm.
     
  12. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Ya..the technique MikeJohns describes is the commonly accepted, most effective way to prepare and maintain the surface of interior steel. Acid can be effective and is a good tool for small, difficult to mechanically, prepare surfaces. Its use is complicated by clean up and protecting surfaces that you dont want to burn with acid. Ive used it many many times with good results. Ive also used the surface tolerant paint Devo BarRust many times . Good stuff.

    when painting bilges, long term protection requires good attention to all steel details. No sharp edges..round them off... corect waterproof steel to steel mecanically fastened joints, chafe protection on easily struck edges, correct paint film thickness, no areas to allow standing water. Clean effective Drain holes or filling voids with chockfast like products so that all water rapidly runs off and all water is pumped out. Get a 20 liter barrel of ChockFast and learn how to use it... Good stuff.
     
  13. War Whoop
    Joined: Jun 2003
    Posts: 661
    Likes: 16, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 84
    Location: Sunny Ft Lauderdale Fla

    War Whoop Senior Member

    Dude you got a puffed up Ego that aside from being rude,people also laugh at your craziness and miss statements.
     
  14. larry larisky

    larry larisky Previous Member

    carbide disk on a linen based, to clean the steel work well. it allow to follow the contour of the hull easily and to clean the small corner easily.
    cleaned time to time the disk with steel brush and petrol, and can be used for a long period of time.
    the coal tar put very hot with a hard round brush give some good result, as a slurry cement.
    we also used the black varnish, which is a form of bitumen. every one had is own preparation.
     

  15. larry larisky

    larry larisky Previous Member

    as an aside i read carefully richard's post, this man is a highly knowledgeable professional and a source of real information's.
    asking him question will be the way to go if somone want to learn something.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.