prawn trawler stabilty

Discussion in 'Stability' started by Sheepy, Apr 24, 2009.

  1. Sheepy
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Sheepy Junior Member

    I was just wondering what you guys would think of the stability of this boat and what it would take to roll her over?

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  2. Sheepy
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Sheepy Junior Member

    Her dimensions are roughy 54 feet long by 18 beam and 7 foot draught.
     
  3. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    2 beers & a late night
     
  4. Sheepy
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    Sheepy Junior Member

    Was hoping for some serious answers.
     
  5. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Sheepy,

    What would you like us to say......

    If she is a fishing boat, as it certainly looks like she is, ask the skipper, or the crew if the skipper is selling her.

    If she has been working your area for a few years and she has been a successful boat, she is more than likely a seakindly vessel.

    Asking someone about the stability of a boat in a picture is rather like showing a race car and saying how fast do you reckon this is.

    Not meaning to be rude or smart, but fishing vessel design , certainly east coast aussie boats like this one, are usually copied for their seakeeping abilities, so if she is an old , proven design, it is for a good reason.

    If you plan on doing a conversion, which somehow I feek is the desire of the request, remember that all the things you take off will affect the roll period of her, so try to keep her balanced.
     
  6. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    i am serious, the problem the world over appears to be restricted draft in harbours & fishing grounds?, i've read an english industry paper, fishing news, for 20 years, i am a Sea Fish Industry Authority , British Government approved wooden boatbuilder, for yachts & boats, & if i build you a boat, i am responsible for the lives of you & your crew, i want to know if you go to sea in a boat i built, that i have done everything i can to make sure she returns safely, & that if she does founder, its not due to my workmanship, but the design of some boats is terrifying, in particular the 70-80 ft beamers of the west country in england, if you put 20 tons of top hamper on a beamer, you need to redesign her & put 30 tons of ballast on her keel, but you cant do that with most trawlers, because of the harbour depths, the gear has become increasingly higher on boats, & you tell me how many fishermen dont run on alcohol, because they work so hard, couple that with possible arrogance & violence, a moments mistake, & she can turn turtle, ask Mcduffs or the Napier Co, scotland for stability calculations, you ask this because i presume your worried about her stability, i am only guessing, that you dont feel safe on her, have a look at my work, type my name & Lulworth, i was in charge of 100 people for 4 years, 17 ft draft, 70 ton keel, now were talking about the stability a trawler needs
     
  7. Sheepy
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Sheepy Junior Member

    She has been afloat since about 1980. I have skippered her for about 12 months in the past, she is a very lively boat at sea, however she makes up for that with her catch rates. These next pics will show you how good she must be, or lucky.

    I was not on her in these pics, thankfully!! Location - Iluka/yamba bar, Clarence river NSW, Australia. As you can see all of her front windows have been pushed in with 2 completely shattered, over $100,000 damage and at least six weeks of refit. Both crew walked away unharmed. I suspect her ultimate stability is very good or she has a hull full of water to keep her upright with that much water on her.

    What would you guys think kept her afloat, Luck or design?

    <images removed due to copyright>
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. Guest62110524

    Guest62110524 Previous Member

    made me smile I knew from first posts she was from northern rivers

    take away the fishing gear, floPper stoppers and you have a bloody great long range cruiser
    when I saw pic reminded me of my youth, STABILTY IS WHAT YOU SEE, SHE HAS IT, \a feeling , for chrissakes, all thisferkin b/s mumbo jumbo from Qld, maritime safety, jobs for little jerks that cant build boats
    good on yer love the wee boat
    was she for sale yachthub last year?
     
  9. Sheepy
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Sheepy Junior Member

    She was built in ballina by corbett I think. There are a few of them around like her. Not sure about yachthub tho, could be one of the other boats of the same design. Would be interested to know myself.

    We went through all the NSW stability stuff with this boat in the pic below. She passed on the old calculations but not on the new computer ones. They wanted to put 3000kg in her. She was a good sea boat, she went through one cyclone in QLD and I put her through a few rough rides. At one point I had the deck full of water in a southerly of about 30 knots and never felt unsafe on her.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    fantastic
     
  11. ABoatGuy
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    ABoatGuy Member

    It is a good looking boat. I have had recent experience with another boat that passed under the old regs, but not the new. The new ones have added a wind and waves criteria that was our problem when light..
     
  12. john.G
    Joined: May 2006
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    Location: australia

    john.G Junior Member

    Made me smile too... I started my career on a sharpie in the Gulf and Torres Straits... and I know how tough a good one is.

    (Mind you, you can't swap it for me K type)
     
  13. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    To answer the question design or luck....... in this case both. The boat would have possibly stood more than that, the equipment less, and the outriggers did not fail (luckily). The impact on the barrier in the first series of pictures show serious forces, but not enough to destroy the asparagus which was meant to hold the radar antenna (the antenna itself interestingly was destroyed). Which idiot did "design" that?..and the asparagus?
    The boating world would be happier if CE class B boats would be designed to stand that. Unfortunately we live in a "real" world with "real" shareholder values and boatbuilders pay a penalty of loosing their living if a proper design and the resulting craftsmanship is the yardstick.
    And btw. chapeau... it seems to be their everyday job to pass this barrier... what people do to earn their living................ sometimes I´m a bit ashamed.
    "my" industry is going away from being sensible...
    Regards
    Richard
     
  14. Typhoon
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Typhoon Senior Member

    I think anyone who takes on teh Clarence river bar in such conditions is a damn fool, no matter what the boat. Luck was a huge factor in that, the broach was not near as bad as it could have been. The north coast boats seem to have fairly shallow skegs and not too pronounced chines forward, combined with fairly rounded/full fore sections to help keep the bow from burying in such events, makse them tend to want to slide down waves rather than trip over them.
    All the north coast boats are extremely seaworthy vessels, but a fool can sink anything. I've a few relatives who are not here now courtesy of that particular bar, and one who swam away from a very similar experienc to that set of photos.......

    Regards, Andrew.
     

  15. Guest62110524

    Guest62110524 Previous Member

    bars like that is NZ, raglan Greymough IF you know your boat well its abig help, so these men are doing thousands hours so they do, in this case the entry of the boat is so critical, as is the rudder, but tend to agree , probably would have stood off myself, what was tide doing?
    In 72 I had to take my tools out to the STRAITS WINNER, a tug going up to Singapore with a tow, I was ferried out in a heap and coming back nearly came a cropper on the Kempsey bar, think that was name, was a long time ago
     
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