Practical and Ideal Berth Design

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Grant Nelson, Jun 1, 2008.

  1. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    Thanks Teddy
     
  2. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    I googled for some detail on how these pipe berths look ,work, and some sizes but not much other than the odd racer mentioning them and of course a lot of charter advertisements.

    If anyone know where one could find a bit of detail I'll appreciate it.

    Berting has been discussed before... as well as pipe berting, just no pics. It takes quite some time to work through the old threads...
     
  3. Gone Ballistic
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    Gone Ballistic Junior Member

    V Berths

    One boat I sailes on had a great arrangement in the foc'sl.

    There was a traditional V berth in the bow with a square front where the berth met the anchor locker. At the aft end / wide end there was a cut-out in the centre with a board and cushion that could be placed over it.

    It therefore served two purposes; one as a large double good for when the boats not at sea and second, with the addition of two leecloths two individual berths with good access to each and suitable for two people who weren't a couple!

    The boat was a narrow 32 foot sailing yacht but I think this could work well further up and down the size range.
     
  4. deepsix
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    deepsix Senior Member

    Fanie

    I have only slept in a couple of pipe cots, they are simply a tubular aluminium frame which is covered by canvas and laced underneath. They have a hinge on one side where they attach to the hull, and you adjust the angle of the pipe cot with a purchase system. I find them comfortable and secure, but they can be tricky to climb in and out of. They are a light weight solution mostly used on racing boats. They can be simply added and removed depending on the number of crew which are sailing.

    Edit : Forgot to add that it puts the weight of the people who are sleeping to the side to keep mono's flat

    [​IMG]
     
  5. FAST FRED
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    "It's definitely too small for an island berth w/o it bing 4' off the deck".

    SO? If the room above the bunk is high enough to sit and read , its high enough for playtime too.

    If a useable step can be incorperated on both sides of the bed , so occupants dont have to crawl over the pillows , it should work fine.

    THe HUGE space under the bed is now useable for storage , space OVER the bed is useless 99% of the time.

    Its nice if the hatches and ports if left cracked will not wet the bed.

    FF
     
  6. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    That's a nice picture - explains it right off, thanks Deepsix ! Beds are all always to short and I hate it whan my feet hangs off something, so I'll make mine say 2 1/2 meters long :D He he, just joking but I can see those are too short.

    It is a nice space and weight saver. If they work well I may put some up here at home... I'm used to sleep on about 120mm on the side of our bed, the wife and animals on the rest ;) Be nice to sleep comfy for a change :D
     
  7. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    The wife likes it, since she was in the army she has seen it before. I jokingly suggested to put some in the bedroom and she said that would be a good idea too...:eek: if it will get me from moaning about my 'side' of the bed :rolleyes:
     
  8. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    Anyone know what that 'vest' material is they used in the pic ?
     
  9. Westfield 11
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    Westfield 11 Senior Member

    I don't get it, the double berths on the DeFever 60 I bareboat charter in the PNW work just fine. No matter what the weather, we sleep comfortably. Well, if it blows up I tend to wake up often to check the anchor, but the motion is just fine. Underway, we just turn on the stabilisers when we get a beam sea, but who wants to sleep the day away when there is such great scenery out the pilothouse windows. Same with the Ocean Alexander 50 Mk I we chartered the previous years. We just wish the "double" was truly a Queen size and not a Marine queen.
     
  10. Grant Nelson
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    Grant Nelson Senior Member

    Then I would love to see some layouts of these boats... a quick search on the web only provides external photos...
     
  11. Westfield 11
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    Westfield 11 Senior Member

    Grant, just go to Yachtworld.com and do a search. There are always a few for sale and there are always many interior pictures. To see the exact boats that I charter go to AYC.com and look under the Fleet section. The boats are the MV Shubui, and MV Shubumi. For even more details follow the links to their individual sites too.

    Michael
     
  12. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    May I ask what was the worst weather :rolleyes:
    No fence meant, and awesome seaworthy vessels but... there's allways a weather for any vessel when comfortability ends.
     
  13. DanishBagger
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    DanishBagger Never Again

    Yup, according to the renowned owners-cum-designers, even this:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    From here, if anyone is interested:
    http://www.setsail.com/dashew/do_PARADIGM.html
     
  14. DanishBagger
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    DanishBagger Never Again

    With regards to a different pipe berth:

    I tried googling for "my" idea, to see if there were some explaining pictures, and I found a great thread, with a great explanation for this idea of "mine". Turns out it's called the Root Berth:

    More information and a discussion is to be found in the thread were I quoted from:
    http://www.woodenboat.com/forum//showthread.php?t=59072

    Since I'm an idjit when it comes to berth names, I figured I'd also google Concordia Berth and post a picture here of a nice one, thinking I'm propably not the only one ignorant to what such a thing is.

    Here we go:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     

  15. Westfield 11
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    Westfield 11 Senior Member

    It's all a matter of horses for courses, I cruise for pleasure and don't leave harbour if the weather looks to be unpleasent. We have been caught out in Georgia Straight in moderate 5 to 6's on the beam at times but since it was daylight who was sleeping?

    Just as one cannot generalise and assume that everyone is an offshore voyaging rough water warrior, nor can one assume that everyone is a dock bound Marina Cruiser. It's exciting to design boats solely with the perfect storm in mind, but how many people actually use their boats that way? And for those that do, how often are they actually rolling from gunnel to gunnel?
     
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