Power tools

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by wudenbote, Aug 19, 2008.

  1. BHOFM
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    BHOFM Senior Member

    Cordless!

    All my Great Grandfathers drill were cordless, I still have
    them and use them often! I have never had one of them
    hangup!
     
  2. wudenbote
    Joined: Aug 2008
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    Location: Middleville Mi

    wudenbote Junior Member

    Kaptin-Jer: What is your sander? Orbital, pad, belt etc.? I have seen the Festool name but don't know anything about them. I like quality tools! The last tool I bought was my Milwaukee compound miter about eight years ago. It was made in USA and has proven itself time and again. Thanks to you and others like you for your valuable insight!
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Festool makes some of the finest tools in the world, but God they think a lot of their products. They have this cool plunge circular saw, but at $1,200 bucks, it better select and stack the lumber it's cutting too.

    One tool they do have, which is hands down the only one I've found that actually works, is their detail sander. Every other I've used, you could stall the motor by leaning on the tool aggressively, leaving a useless vibrating sissy. Not the Festool detail sander. I've actually used the weight of my body against one, without it bitching a lick, still cutting and never stalling. This is one of their inexpensive tools, for around $400. Their shop vacuum is also a great product, but again the price suggests the third Reich is attempting a pay back.

    Sanders are what most folks buy, until they learn how to finish wooden surfaces. With other materials, you don't have much choice, you have to use power tools to force the stuff to yield to your will, but wood can be "talked" into position with less convincing.

    The typical list is a DA (duel action, orbital), which does duty as a rough to medium surfacing work, detail and finish sanders (jitter bugs, etc.) for the fine work, belt sanders of various shapes for rough work. I have several sanders, but for production type work I usually pull out the air tools (in line sander - 2 sizes, jitter bugs, drum, grinder, belt and a couple of DA's)

    When it comes time to really finish wood, there is no substitute for hand work and skill. Nothing looks as good as a hand rubbed piano and no power sander will produce this finish, though Festool may soon market one for $2,400 bucks that comes close. Learning how to plane and scrape a surface smooth, produces such better results that you'll use your power tools to rough things in, then put them down for the "real finish work".

    I'm sure a machine could satisfy your lover as well, if not more then you, but some things should be left to your own hands, as they are much more sensitive to the surface requirements then a machine.
     
  4. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    You just described my cutting table perfectly! Mine knocks down for the off season.

    The zero clearance bases are a great idea: I have them on a lot of my tools. Even my (handheld) power planer has a reduced clearance wood base - the aluminum bases have far too much clearance behind the cutters - I use mine for cutting the rolling bevels for glued planks, the base is extended both sides to rest on the earlier planks.

    Speaking of dust, I tape a 20 in square furnace filter on a 20 inch box fan which is attached to the ceiling; powered off the light switch; it is great for clearing the air while sanding.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2008
  5. Lt. Holden
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Location: Western Massachusetts

    Lt. Holden Senior Member

    I own numerous Festool Power Tools and while they are pricey they are the best that I have ever used. What you need to keep in mind in considering them is that they for the most part are designed as a system.

    The catalog is downloadable (in PDF format) here:
    http://www.festoolusa.com/Web_files/Festool-2008-Catalog.pdf

    What they do offer is superb ergonomics, precision and results. Their dust extractors work in conjunction with all of their tools (except the drills) and make an amzing difference. When coupled with their RO150EQ (dual mode Random Orbit/Rotary) sander they greatly reduce swirling, extend abrasive life and collect nearly all the dust.

    if you would like to learn more visit the Festool Owners Group. You can search on any relavent topic.
     
  6. the1much
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    the1much hippie dreams

    do they last if you refuse to oil em?
     
  7. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    My "top" powertools: Cordless driver/drill Festool :) (not any better than X), Makita band sander :D (not for rookies) and table circ saw :confused: (Bosh, by the way it sucks) and Makita planner:D
     
  8. Kaptin-Jer
    Joined: Mar 2004
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    Kaptin-Jer Semi-Pro

    I see I logged on too late, and your question has been answered. Par is right I still go to bed at night dreaming of a stack of Festool containers. Then I wake up in a cold sweat. I will be buying the Festool vacuum. (some day). It is great. I burned out one Home Depot type that I had rigged to the sander, but the Festool is quiet, turns on and off with the sander and uses a bag. A few of the pros around the marina use them all the time, but I can't get a tax write off when I buy mine.:mad:
     
  9. the1much
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    Location: maine

    the1much hippie dreams

    i can :D ,,, buy it for me and i'll write it off this year :)

    P.S. (this is off topic) how'd ya weather the storm Kapt.?
     
  10. Kaptin-Jer
    Joined: Mar 2004
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    Kaptin-Jer Semi-Pro

    Gee it's great to have friends like you. At least you could have offered to buy it for me!!
    Storm caused me no problems. The Benny looks like Spiderman got drunk, but I'll leave the web on until after Hurricane season. My son (Who is in that place you were going to visit) was off work for 3 days because of flooding. Heat index is well over 120. Bolted the tabernacle on yesterday, but just too hot and humid to go out there today.
    Sorry guys didn't mean to high-jack, (I'm done now---)
     
  11. northerncat
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    northerncat Senior Member

  12. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Don't wanna spoil your dreams but, eventually after sometime they are a real PITA.. We have them at work and trust me I know...
    HILTI is way to go with portable vacuums... However much better with a stationary system.. my dream.. if I had a stationary boatshop.. instead of a tent..
     
  13. Kaptin-Jer
    Joined: Mar 2004
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    Kaptin-Jer Semi-Pro

    I don't think Hilti sells their Vacuums in the U.S. The Hilti US web site will only give a quote if you send an email address. I'm sure it's a special order. In the states Hilti is best known for their power fasteners (shot pins).
     
  14. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    alan white Senior Member

    Favorite power tools? I wish we could talk about something nicer, like hand tools.
    I imagine heaven as a place where you don't need power tools. People who get a hold of Grandpa's hand tools make them dull or out of kilter quickly, so their only experience of them is that they are some sort of torture devices.
    It's all about time. With a few exceptions (like thicknessing or ripping wood or rapid drilling through hard materials), hand tools (adzes, saws, planes, scrapers, draw knives, spokeshaves, etc.) are fast and pleasant to use.
    They are sometimes faster but usually slower, and they always sound better.
    I use power tools all the time. They spit crap in your face, tear at your ears, and fill your lungs with dust.
    When there's no rush, or when it HAS to be right (like using spokeshave, rasp and scraper on a hand-carved tiller with an S-curve in the grain itself instead of laminations clamped to a form), and when it's your own boat, you have a right to enjoy your work for once.
    At the end of the sailing season, when I've had enough good sailing adventures, I begin to look forward to implementing all the ideas I had all Summer to modify and improve my boat---- and even the process of repainting and varnishing is enjoyable if it's not rushed.
    I guess the highest honor I could bestow upon any of my power tools wouldn't be "best", but most expeditious. An expeditious means to an end.
    My ears are ringing right now.
    I do like my new Milwaukee jig saw however. I highly recommend it, and it's not too loud or dusty...

    Alan
     

  15. BHOFM
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    BHOFM Senior Member

    Allen;

    We are cut from the same cloth.

    Today I used my Great Grandfathers plane to fair the taper
    on the keel plank, and when I fit the chines to the stem I
    used his dividers to mark them for cutting. Both of these are
    well over 100 years old. When I do need a power saw, I use
    my Grand Dads, 1958 Craftsman, I have the case, instruction
    manual, the original blade and the receipt from Sears! Also
    the three prong adapter that came with it!

    These are not tools, they are treasures far beyond what
    money can buy!

    It makes the finished product something from the past!

    Sorry to get off topic!:p :p :p
     

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