Power Cruiser for Florida/Bahamas

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Starhop, Nov 23, 2017.

  1. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 4,654
    Likes: 87, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Spain

    TANSL Senior Member

    Part of the challenge is building it himself, the other part is designing it. If he gets these two parts, time is irrelevant.
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 6,303
    Likes: 132, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Naturally a website called "boatdesign" attracts people with a strong interest in self-designing, otherwise they'd just google "boat plans". Usually they are answered with advice to buy a proven stock design. Which is most of the time, the right advice. You don't want to get into trial and error experiments where considerable time, effort, and money, are involved, especially if there is the risk of exposure to danger, on the open sea. And especially if relatively cheap and comprehensive plans are available for a boat that fits the SOR well.
     
  3. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
    Posts: 1,557
    Likes: 52, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 506
    Location: Monroe WA

    ondarvr Senior Member

    Well, he wanted it finished in one year so he can go off to college with it, so if having it in time is more important than designing and building, then it does become relevant, but that part is up to him. I can see this in ten years being an unfinished project in a family memebers barn. One year to build a 32' from start to finish is not something a typical first timer can do.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2017
    fallguy likes this.
  4. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 342
    Likes: 12, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    Ondarvr is making a point that is really important. The likelihood of design and build in a year for a college kid is near zero.

    The likelihood of build in one year for college age, no design is near zero.

    The likelihood of a pro builder taking a new plan like tw28 and finishing in a year is the best chance.

    I am building a boat and have a two year time budget that looks meetable still.
     
  5. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 2,040
    Likes: 120, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1244
    Location: UK, USA and Canada

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    Fallguy has already mentioned my Skoota 32 powercat. I write this on board our Skoota28, its smaller sister. Right now we are ashore in Indiantown, Fl. But next week we relaunch and then head to the Bahamas for our third winter. It was built in Sequim, Wa, USA in about 2000 hours, just about 1 year full time by one person - the first complete boat he had ever built. You can see more here Sailing Catamarans - Skoota 28 transportable minimum live aboard cruiser http://sailingcatamarans.com/index.php/designs-2/6-powercats/264-skoota-28

    We have cruised it now over 6000 miles and find it very comfortable for a couple. we usually cross the Gulf Stream to the Bahamas at a 10 knot average (quicker coming back to the US as we are not so deeply loaded) We have a rigid sailing dinghy (for me), an inflatable kayak and bicycle (for my wife) her sewing machine, my computers. Food for 3 months, range under power about 300 miles, water for a month. Tools and spares to rebuild the boat, yet apart from the dinghy in davits, everything is stored in lockers.

    You might find this article useful Sailing Catamarans - The Ideal Pacific NW Cruiser (a Skoota powercat!) http://sailingcatamarans.com/index.php/articles/43-power-catamarans/478-the-ideal-pnw-cruiser20

    Good luck with your project

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
  6. Starhop
    Joined: Nov 2017
    Posts: 15
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: United States of America

    Starhop Junior Member

    Come to think of it, I'll add this to my list of possibilities. A full custom refit of an old (but seaworthy) existing hull would be far easier to complete in a year.... and would eliminate most of the design work involved. Not sure if ill end up going that route, but its worth considering.
     
  7. Starhop
    Joined: Nov 2017
    Posts: 15
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: United States of America

    Starhop Junior Member

  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 18,656
    Likes: 383, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    To be frank, no you wouldn't be well advised to self design this puppy. Your questions and comments thus far haven't indicated you have the required understanding of what's necessary in developing an off shore powerboat design. Plans would be the logical recommendation and (again) there's many to select from. Style and accommodations can be modified to your needs and tastes, but the basic elements would be already calculated, with an appropriate safety margin, which is the real point.

    A crew of 10 would make the project go quickly, assuming they had some serious boat building skills. If it's simply 10 friends that did an okay job on aunt Millie's kitchen cabinet replacement last year, well not so much. It's tough keeping that size crew busy, unless they have some experience and tend to be self starters. I've hired lots of crew over the years and the only ones worthy to keep, are the experienced builders/fabricators that also happen to be self starters, which isn't all that common a trait. My point is, once the crew gets an idea of the plans and "deeds" that need be done for the day/week, they'll be off (under direction preferably) tackling a particular aspect of a project. There's nothing worse than 10 guys standing around, most with the deer in the headlights look on their faces, hoping you're the worlds finest director of labor. These don't last long and don't produce much.

    If I hired a crew of 6-7 and brought along a few of my trusted former crew members, I'd have either of both of the boats listed above built and doing sea trials in 2 months, with not a lot of sweating. This assumes materials on hand, not back ordered, supplies, tanks, engine(s), etc. This might seem ambitious, but not with 10 on a 30 footer. It does require coordination, work space, tools, etc., but this is what you'd expect from a successful shop with skilled crew. For example, Randy is a buddy and one I'll call, if I was on this project. We'd go over the plans and he'd start assembling station molds on the lofting table, as soon as I could get dimensions in his hand, knowing I'd be off working on a strong back to stand the station molds up on when he'd finished. I can't emphasis the importance of this aspect, of any build with crew. Another example would be putting Randy on an electrical job. He'd get it done, but would struggle, as it's not his forte, so recognize what you crew's skill sets are and keep them focused toward them.
     
    fallguy likes this.
  9. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 4,654
    Likes: 87, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Spain

    TANSL Senior Member

    My idea was, with all due respect for the OP, that it is not possible for him to design the boat and, therefore, to talk about how long the construction will last, it does not make any sense.
    That said, as far as I know, to a specialized shipyard, apart from 2 months to do the basic project, to build this boat, with all the definition process, purchasing, development of construction plans, construction, sea testing, ... it can cost around a year and a half (maybe less ). So talking about a year for project and construction does not seem very close to reality.
     
  10. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 342
    Likes: 12, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    To the OP; if you purchase an existing hull. Please do not do so without a survey and not a survey you are handed by the seller unless it is very recent and you can verify the surveyor's independence. You can end up with nothing but a hunk of garbage not suited for anything. (from experience)
     
  11. Starhop
    Joined: Nov 2017
    Posts: 15
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: United States of America

    Starhop Junior Member

    Yes, I will certainly get a survey done if I go this route. Thanks :)
     
  12. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 4,654
    Likes: 87, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Spain

    TANSL Senior Member

    @Starhop, if you go ahead with the idea of designing "yourself your own project", despite the difficulties involved, I would be willing to help you with the basic project. Construction is another matter.
     
  13. Starhop
    Joined: Nov 2017
    Posts: 15
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: United States of America

    Starhop Junior Member

    @TANSL , I appreciate it! I'll let you know when I decide which way I decide to do this project. One thing, for sure, though, there will be a boat project!
     
  14. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 2,730
    Likes: 124, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1279
    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    Starhop, you appear to be a bright young guy who has been, not surprisingly, steered way off course. If you are to attend and prosper academically in a university in Florida, or any other state, then do so with resolve that you will achieve Phi Beta Kappa status for academics, not boat building or weekend sailing to Bimini or Cat Kay or some other place.

    Do yourself a life shaping favor that will positively influence your destiny for many years to come. Do continue your passion for boats and cruising but put those ambitions on hold while you excel at whatever academic pursuit that you have chosen. You will be far more capable to do as your passion dictates when you have become a high ranking graduate with a better than average capacity for earning.
     

  15. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 6,303
    Likes: 132, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I don't know about being led astray, I think the general drift of remarks was in the direction of dissuasion, particularly that of self-designing a boat like what he is contemplating. He may have a wealthy family and the money can be found, but the advice given about building was generally along the lines that a great amount of time was involved, and dependence on a bunch of other similarly enthusiastic (initially) neophytes to bring it to fruition, was highly problematic.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.