Power Boat Design Challenge

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Sleipnir, Jun 4, 2014.

  1. Sleipnir
    Joined: Jun 2014
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    Sleipnir Junior Member

    Greetings to all. Having lurked here for some months I have decided to try the "public" approach.

    I have for the better part of the past 2 years played with some ideas for a number of innovative power boat concepts..... initially as a stimulating hobby project, nothing more. At the same time I have also developed a fairly promising business model in support of these boat concepts. Now I am seriously considering taking my hobby project a step or two further.

    Let me first explain where I come from. I have been a small scale entrepreneur for 20 years. Previously I was in retailing, then running a cleaning company with 4-5 employees and currently I'm in web-advertising. By no means a rich man I have always earned a living directly from the market place without an employer as middle-man. Still do (but getting a little bored with the current set-up).

    I'm not a boat designer, nor do I have a degree in engineering. I'm the inventor type. I can imagine and perfect an innovative concept; develop an unusual business model; think up a system or method to solve a problem or optimize a process. That said, I am usually quick to pick up basic understanding of almost any issue...... marine engineering included. Did I mention it was basic understanding - not advanced and detailed knowledge.

    So, in a nutshell I seek two kinds of feedback from you knowledgeable and talented people.

    1) Constructive criticism concerning the viability, practicability and marketability of my boat concept ideas. Constructive back-patting also welcomed.

    2) Since this is a forum where the passion for the creation of boat design is in focus, maybe some of the designer nerds here would be interested in visualizing my ideas. In other words, an actual design suggestion! In case anyone creates a design which I later decide to use then the creator will of course both be credited with and rewarded for his/her work.

    For the time being I prefer to keep large chunks of the intended business model under wraps. I will also withhold a few specific details about the boat concept, but otherwise I will try to describe everything in the following posts.
     
  2. Sleipnir
    Joined: Jun 2014
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    Sleipnir Junior Member

    So the basics of my concept boat is as follows -
    - Conventional planing hull, GRP (vacuum infusion, sandwich construction)
    - Single diesel engine; standard Mercury Bravo 3 outdrive. Twin motorization NOT an option.
    - Hull length: ~32ft.
    - Length on waterline: ~28ft.
    - Hull beam: ~10½ft.
    - Dry displacment: 4.2 - 4.5 tons
    - Anticipated top speed: ~30 knots

    The boat will be tailored as a comfortable holiday cruiser for up to 6 people, but will be equally ideal as a day cruiser and picnic boat for up to 10-12 people. It will be usable in both hot as well as more unpredictable climates.

    So far, no trace of innovation;)

    The boat will be equipped with a relatively low cost Joystick Maneuvering & Docking system as standard. The boat will also be supplied with 120/230V AC power; anytime and anywhere - without installing an auxiliary generator. This system is actually an off-the-shelf system already offered by several engine suppliers. I believe these features are essential to accommodate future boat owners' expectations. The boat should be easy to control (dock especially) and it should have the same comfort as your home (which includes domestic power). As far as I know, these features have never been included as standard in a motor boat of this size and displacement. The trick is to do it without cost spiraling out of control, which I think can be done.

    Now for the boat layout: It will be an updated interpretation of a boat type which found many buyers in the 80s and 90s. Mostly in the USA, but a large number of them ended up in Europe too: The small-boat Command Bridge Cruiser. Bayliner 2558 Ciera Command Bridge is a good example. Carver 26/28 Flybridge is another. For models still in production, check out Caribbean 24 Flybridge. So it is a flybridge model, but with a lower profile than most flybridge boats produced now. This is possible because the saloon sits lower in the hull than usual. Unlike the mentioned models I intend to have a full-beam superstructure. This will maximize interior space as well as flybridge deck area. The sidewalks are sacrificed, but there is a solution to that (to be explained later)

    The interior layout is unusual. The toilet/head is on the main deck (same level as the saloon) rather than forward on the lower deck as is usual for a 32ft boat. The entire forward lower deck is dedicated a very large double cabin (Owner's Cabin) which converts to a comfortable lounging space for 5-6 people by rearranging the berths along the hull side.

    to be continued......
     
  3. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Sleipnir, my friend, inventor, did you know that a picture is worth a thousand words?
    Cheers
     
  4. Sleipnir
    Joined: Jun 2014
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    Sleipnir Junior Member

    The saloon is dominated by a very large (raised) dinette to port and a large galley (with a 200+ liters fridge - you can never have too much refrigerating capacity on a boat:)) to starboard. The forward bench of the dinette can be turned 180deg to become a helm bench when the boat is helmed from inside. The dinette also converts to a double berth for the night - curtains providing a degree of privacy. The galley takes advantage of the domestic power supply and goes all-electric; no gas or other petrochemicals.

    The aft end of the saloon has the toilet/head to starboard (partially tucked under the stairs to the flybridge) and the guest cabin to port. The guest cabin is really only a box that you step down into - probably 3 steps down. The cabin's double berth is right under the dinette, but there will be enough headroom that it should not feel claustrophobic. The box's ceiling can fold away for day-time use, so the cabin is in open connection with the saloon. On a rainy day it will be a perfect place for children and their Nintendos, tablets and similar. Or to retire with a good book and a snack.

    The saloon has roll-down windows (like cars) on both sides, effectively converting the saloon to an outdoor area (although in the shade). The aft end of the saloon has a folding door and folding windows towards the aft cockpit connecting the two spaces when the weather permits. There are 2 steps up from the saloon to the aft cockpit and from there another 6-7 comfortable steps to the flybridge. Forget about near-vertical ladders only usable by acrobats.

    The flybridge itself will have a sitting area which converts to a large sunbed by lowering the table and adding a cushion. Forward; a helm seat to starboard and a companion seat to port. Pretty conventional for a flybridge....... except flybridges with this much space usually require a much larger boat.

    Ohh, one difference more. Remember the missing sidewalks? So the foredeck is accessed from the flybridge via a gate and a comfortable 3-4 steps ladder.

    This layout provides - for a boat this modest size - unprecedented indoor as well as outdoor living and entertaining areas. The convertibility of the cabins, respectively to a lounging area and a children's/reading cave means that even 6-8 people will not go crazy being confined indoors on a rainy day. On most similar sized boats the usable public indoor space is limited to the dinette... and that's it. The boat will also be unmatched by competitors for picnics and day cruises. Up to 6 people on the flybridge, 5-6 people in the aft cockpit and another 5-6 people in the opened up saloon. That's of course more people than the boat will be classified for, but also illustrates how this relatively small boat could accommodate a cocktail party for up to 20 people (remember also the lounging area forward) when securely tied to the quayside.
     
  5. Sleipnir
    Joined: Jun 2014
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    Sleipnir Junior Member

    Yes, but I am neither a designer nor an illustrator. My 2-dimensonal back-of-a napkin (OK, I'm exaggerating) drawings are really not illuminating much.

    Tried to post a picture, but no luck.
     
  6. tom kane
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Hamilton.New Zealand.

    tom kane Senior Member

    I like different from traditional designs and innovation.. but what is realy different or new.I will keep watching.
     
  7. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    If you want to innovate figure out how to create the boat for say 1/5 the price of todays plastic cookies and still make a profit.
     
  8. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    This challenge is reminding me more of the All-Bran Challenge, so far.
     
  9. Sleipnir
    Joined: Jun 2014
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    Sleipnir Junior Member

    Good remark...... illustrates that what is apparent to A rarely is equally obvious to B.

    So I'll try to point it out in detail.

    Integrating domestic on-board power and a Joystick Maneuvering System from the beginning as part of the standard package is a first-time for a boat of this size - so you could say this is an innovative approach. Yes, this will increase production cost, but far less than if the same features were optional extras added only sometimes if a buyer choose to pay a (usually outrageous) extra sum for these particular features. The result is that buyers get significant extra utility - the comfort of domestic power and unbeatable docking control - for relatively little extra money.

    Second, my choice of a full beam superstructure adds ~20% useable area to both the saloon and the flybridge (or command bridge - the term often used 20 years ago) above the saloon. Full beam superstructures (= no side-decks) are not new as such, but usually you see them on smaller Cabin Bow-Riders (where it is possible to simply have a forward facing door leading to the bow) or on Open boats (where it is possible to have a small door in the windscreen and steps down to the cockpit). Choosing a full beam superstructure for a flybridge boat is arguably innovative.

    The accommodation spaces on the boat are given multiple uses: The saloon which is mostly avoided during daytime in warm climates becomes more attractive for daytime activities by rolling down all side-windows and compeltely folding away windows and doors towards the aft cockpit. The forward double cabin becomes a favored entertaining area for the evenings or when the weather turns sour, simply by rearranging the interior a bit. Install a TV and you have a superb Home Cinema.

    The innovative effort is all about squeezing more (potential) utility out of a boat of a given size. Yes, the same utility could be provided by a bigger boat.... but bigger boats are much more expensive to buy, own and operate.

    The leisure boating industry has an inverse pricing structure. The bigger the boat, the higher the price per kilo of boat usually is. This to some extent defies logic, but it illustrates the importance of getting as much useability and utility out of any boat of a given size. There's potentially a significant competitive advantage buried in the industry's inverse pricing structure - providing boat owners/users more possibilities with a smallish boat is the logical way to seize that advantage opportunity
     
  10. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    DO everything boats usually suffer from doing NOTHING very well., as everyones Desirements for the boat differ.
     

  11. tom kane
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Hamilton.New Zealand.

    tom kane Senior Member

    I do not want to make love to a boat or worship it`s lines and beauty..I want a boat that does what it is designed to do well and efficiently and is easy to handle on an off the water. And it must have all of the saftey requirements that I demand...no chance of bursting into flames.And I do not like a plastic bath tubs and I want user friendly materials.
    that is enough for a start. And I do not want to have to pull it apart just to sit down or have a sleep.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2014
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