Portagable, backcountry camp cruiser? Does it exist?

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by WorstBoatEver, Sep 20, 2016.

  1. WorstBoatEver
    Joined: Sep 2016
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    WorstBoatEver New Member

    Basically I'm looking for a boat large enough for two people to sleep aboard, but still light enough to portage as far as 1-2km like a canoe.

    Doesn't have to be a cabin or anything, could just be a boom tent.

    Weight of the hull needs to be under 200lbs maybe up to 250 if it's possible for 2 people to carry.

    Material doesn't matter, lighter + simpler the better though.

    Doesn't need to be too stable, will only be on small-medium sized lakes in ok weather.

    Shallowest possible draft.

    I was originally thinking an Oozegoose with a leeboard, but it seems like a lot more work for not much benefit over a PD Goose with a tent and a platform.

    Not really interested in a sailing canoe, would like to be able to sleep side by side and a little more comfortably. I've already got a canoe anyway.


    Anyone have any suggestions? Insults? I have a feeling this might just be very stupid, but I really can't get over the idea of sailing and sleeping aboard in back country Algonquin etc


    For reference :

    Oozegooze: http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/korhonen/oozegoose/index.htm

    PD goose: http://www.storerboatplans.com/Pdr/pdgoose.html
     
  2. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    An inflatable raft with a bivvy over?
     
  3. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    a quick google shows there are many tent kits for rubber rafts, and quite a few sail kits if you want to sail too.
     
  4. gggGuest
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    gggGuest ...

    Wouldn't it be a whole lot easier to have a separate tent and sleep on shore rather than sleep in the boat?

    Another thought might be to have two canoes, which apart from anything else makes portage a whole lot easier since you only have to carry half the load at a time.
     
  5. Skyak
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    Skyak Senior Member

    For that purpose you can't beat a canoe ~19ft. They figured it out thousands of years ago. The only caveat is to build a flat raised bottom to avoid wet or damp sleeping bags. I like to build storage in the floor for cans and water. You will find there are very few sizes and they make wonderful ballast.
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    A couple of inflatable mats (like the ones you float on at the beach) on the bottom of the canoe and a tarp are all you need. It is light, simple and cheap. Used canoes are plentiful and not too expensive. Particularly if you are OK with a heavier fiberglass canoe; maybe 80-90lb
     
  7. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    there was a member of the forum that designed a boat that was 16 ft long, about 4 ft wide, with a rowing station, a small sleeping cabin, and a mast that used a sailboard rig.

    He contacted me early in the development of his concept to help him work out some design issues, i was happy to contribute. But it was his concept and his design. He built it several years ago and I saw him at the port townsend wooden boat festival in 2014 and 2015 I think.

    He traveled long distances in it under sail or oar power, spent many nights on it with his girl friend. He was selling plans through duckworth I think.

    I do not recall the name, but it appears to fit your needs, not even sure how to search for it. It was a bright yellow color, with a sail board carbon mast and sail, I would think you should be able to find plans for it over on the duckworth website. the designer/builder wrote an extensive article about it for the website.
     
  8. Nnnnnnnn
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    Nnnnnnnn Junior Member

    Attached Files:

  9. rasorinc
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    Fill the pontoons with helium to lighten the load. Make the platform with a center hinge so you can fold it for carrying.
     
  10. sharpii2
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    sharpii2 Senior Member

    The title of your post seems to imply travel down narrow, winding footpaths through the woods.

    A boat that is about 4 ft wide doesn't seem compatable with such a portage, no matter how light it is.

    Perhaps a catamaran, made up of two canoes, with the sleeping platform on top, would work. But this would mean at least two trips, each portage, maybe three, then reasembly. A whole lot of work for just a marginal improvement in comfort.

    Perhaps this is why no such boat seems to exist.
     
  11. Barry
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    Barry Senior Member

    How are you intending to power it?
    Row, could be wider, Paddle with two, probably narrow, outboard width does not matter as much, sail
    And what is the max width that you would want to deal with for a portage?
     
  12. Barry
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    Barry Senior Member

    Two 14 foot long by 2 feet diameter tubes will lift about 6 pounds. You would need very big tubes to make this viable
     
  13. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    I just remembered the name of the small, portagable, rowable and sailable boat, it is called the March Duck, designed and build by scot domergue of Twisp WA.

    Here is a picture from another thread:

    [​IMG]

    Here is a link to duckworth's where they sell plans and kits for it:

    http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/domergue/marshduck/index.htm
     
  14. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member


  15. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    FYI the Hobie also comes with a trampoline. You could camp on that with a small dome tent or just camp on shore.
     
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