Pop-Up Cleats

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Willallison, Jan 3, 2008.

  1. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    I'm trying to find a manufacturer of modern-looking pop-up or flip-up cleats that don't require a drain. Any clues?
     
  2. USCGRET/E8
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    USCGRET/E8 Senior Chief

  3. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    Thanks USC... Unfortunately they all need drains. Accon do make a flip-up one, but I'm not that keen on the style.
    There's a very nice european one that's made of aluminium, with flip-up 'wings' - Can't remember the manufacturer - doesn't really matter though - the were about 500 euro's a pop!
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Will, I remember the one I think you're looking for. It popped up, but the base was raised and it self drained from waterways machined on the base. I don't remember the manufacture, but they were purely modern powerboat styling and costly. I'll see if I can find an old add for one (they may be gone now).
     
  5. Gilbert
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    Gilbert Senior Member

    I've seen many commercial fishermen use a piece of innertube rubber fastened down on the forward and inner side of cleats to keep lines, nets, etc. from hanging up on them. I know it's not a pop-up cleat so don't bother telling me.
     
  6. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    Thanks guys - attached is a pic of the Nomen Cleat.... the very expensive one. It isn't exactly what I'm after, and it's certainly outside the acceptable price range, but it's got a nice contemporary look to it.
    Also a pic of the fold-up one from Accon Marine... quite nice, but I was after something a bit squarer. (Now he's just being picky!;) ) Also not too sure about how practical it would be with those sharp edges...might chafe ropes a bit...?
    Any and all suggestions much appreciated as always...:D
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Pericles
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    Pericles Senior Member

    On page 22 of http://thecoastalpassage.com/papers/tcp24.pdf you will see the disappearing cleat in the article about last year's Auckland Boat Show.

    Description: One product that took my eye was a cleat, manufactured by Strong Marine Ltd, it was
    electrically operated from a switch at the helmstation, and was designed so that in its
    down position, the rope would simply drop off, and the cleat would be flush with the deck'

    Pericles
     
  8. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    Now that has to be the coolest bit of kit ever made! They're called Autocleat, though once again outside the price range for this application (but pretty reasonable given the engineering involved...)

    It doesn;t exactly fit in with my "less-is-more" pholosophy either....but hey, I have an internal struggle between the KISS principle and a serious case of affluenza..... what can I say!:D
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Handy In so much as you don't stub your toe but---

    I mean? --as a cleat I would'nt use it to tie up the boat seriously, and expect it to be there when I get back.

    As is any compromise its of little use but looks good.
     
  10. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    I'm sure that the engineering is sound enough to ensure that so long as you know how to 'tie a knot', it wouldn't let go of its own accord.
    I have visions of arriving at my berth to tie up single handed in a blow, only to discover that I'd forgotten to push the button on the dash to raise all the cleats......:eek:
     
  11. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    These seem like the best option so far....
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    I disagree that the 'engineering' is good.
    Take the one that folds down, it folds down on a hinge, a hinge that has a small pin that cant be much more than 3/4mm. Through the cleat is a hole.

    A chain is as strong as its weakest link.

    They are by no means as strong as a proper cleat.

    For a speed boat thats needs to tie up to a fishing pier while you pop up the the shop they are ok. But for a serious sea boat,well--I wouldnt tie my fenders to them.
     
  13. charmc
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    charmc Senior Member

    Will,

    I'm inclined to weigh in with Frosty on this one. The question, of course, is what is the purpose of the cleats? Spring loaded or pin mounted cleats will be intrtinsically weak at the non-cleat part. The two horn design that raises and lowers via power is a prisoner of a power system. They look cool and have a lower profile when stowed/folded, etc.; but what is the function beyond that?

    The memory of my boat moored securely in her slip during several 50-80 knot storms makes me glad that all cleats were large and through-bolted with strong backing plates. Stepping around them is a small price for security.
     
  14. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    I take your point Frosty - these types of fitting certainly aren't fit for all purposes...
    But I pose the question... just what holds a 'real' cleat to the deck? Quite often it's only screws (should never be done IMHO) but even with thru bolts, they are probably not much larger in total cross-section than the pins to which you refer.....
    Weakest link, as you say....

    Out of interest, just what do you tie your fenders to?
     

  15. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    Sorry Charlie - we were both obviously typing at the same time...

    I have no experience with the Autocleat, so I can only go on the info on their website. In their defense, I think they do have a manual oparation back-up.

    As I said a moment ago, I agree that all these cleats have limitations as to their use - it'd be REALLY interesting to see some comparative strain testing done on the various types available
     
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