Pontoon rowing scull?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Lindsey, Jul 23, 2018.

  1. Lindsey
    Joined: Jul 2018
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    Location: Lake superior

    Lindsey New Member

    041CDDFD-1541-4813-919A-2D86A2925ACF.png D23329E9-E660-4C22-AAA4-7A6D6649D1AE.jpeg Hello. I found this site while looking for ideas on how to create a more stable rowing scull. I have a hairbrained idea but, before I invest a ton of time and money, it would be wonderful if someone with actual boat building knowledge would provide me with their thoughts!

    Basically, I rowed through college and have been wanting to buy a scull for years. We just moved to a home on Lake Superior and so far I think an echo islander would work great on calm summer days; however, something more stable might allow me to go out more often.

    I have been out on an islander on the ocean and small lakes but, as I’m sure you all know, the great lakes are a different beast.

    My thought is to take a single man pontoon style fishing craft, remove the seat/rigging and solder an Alden oarmaster in its palace. Im sure there will be more engineering involved than a simple swap out but that’s the basic idea. I haven’t found anything like it on line so I’m guessing it won’t work; However, it would be great to hear some thoughts from people who know far more than I!

    Thank you!
     
  2. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    I'd consider two rowing shells, 27 feet each like you used to row, set up catamaran style with a rowing station framework in between.
    Colleges often let old shells go for little to nothing with no hardware on them.
    Cover the decks, add some deck fittings to receive your custom rowing station and you're away.
    OR
    A couple of old surf skis, 20 feet each, same approach.
     
  3. Manfred.pech
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Manfred.pech Senior Member

    The floats of the "pontoon style fishing craft" seem to me too short for a rowing craft and if you take the rowing rigging on them there might be dangerous movements caused by the change of the center of gravity with the sliding seat. For fishing it might be O.K.. But there are a lot of other solutions. For me one of the best seems to be the ROCAT and its follower: [​IMG]


    cristofa | the ROCAT http://www.cristofa.co.uk/-/galleries/rocat/
    and a lot of other solutions:
    rowing catamaran - Google Search https://www.google.com/search?q=rowing+catamaran&client=firefox-b&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=L10E0PLwNkDuPM%253A%252C_eJ6PEDACMDO3M%252C_&usg=__lZQnd0PutzcnS6triB_VfwrZuAA%3D&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiruLbcwbXcAhWRx6YKHeOpD4wQ9QEIMDAC#imgrc=0fZczw76-nl4uM:

    Or as a trimaran with long oars: [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2018
  4. fredrosse
    Joined: Jan 2005
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    Location: Philadelphia PA

    fredrosse USACE Steam

    The pontoon boat in your picture would definitely be troublesome with a sliding seat, weight shift would not be handled well with those hulls. You probably know far more about rowing options, but I would suggest you have a look on youtube, some excellent options: 8 things to know before you buy a rowing boat
     
  5. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    Observein the video that the Rowcat has sliding oarlocks not a sliding seat.
     
  6. Manfred.pech
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: EU

    Manfred.pech Senior Member

  7. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    That hull will be very difficult to keep going straight. The round bottom/ entry and exit of the hull and the fact that it is short doesn't give anything that prevents turning.

    Skinny hulls and sliding rigger gets you a small boat that doesn't pitch.
    Immersing a sharp bow and stern about 1 1/2" will keep the boat on course.
    This one I built for my wife.

    Well this stupid site won't let me upload from my computer.
    I'll send a PM.
    Now I find you can't have a "conversation" until you do some more posts.

    If you want to see the boat, send me an email at upchurchmr@yahoo.com
     
  8. Manfred.pech
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: EU

    Manfred.pech Senior Member


    Hope, I can help you. Do you mean this one ?

    [​IMG]
     
  9. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Manfred, thanks very much - yes.
     
  10. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Lindsey,

    Have you dropped this idea?
    There actually are quite a few boats that have been made that "could" fit your requirements.
    There is not much engineering to it unless you want to go out in outrageous weather.

    Marc
     
  11. peterAustralia
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    peterAustralia Senior Member

    why bother with this?

    Rowing is about exercise, getting out there, going places, getting out on the water. The normal rowing boat can do great things, how does the double hull improve anything? More wetted surface, more effort at lower speed, yes a higher top speed, no protection from the elements, no place to put stores
     

  12. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    From the boat shown above:
    1. Its very stable
    2. Its pretty fast
    3. I seriously doubt the wetted surface is significantly more, because the boat weighs very little. Keep in mind this is in a stable boat.
    4. You can get just as much exercise.
    5. You will never be at a low speed, cause it's really easy to drive.
    6. Protection from the elements? Aren't most sculls "open"?
    7. No place to put stores - absolutely true as shown. How much stores do you put in a scull?

    If I were to modify the boat shown, I would put in a seat with a back rest - to relax when I wanted to.
    I'd also put a small area to hold "stores". A drink and a pair of shoes at the least
    I'd make it lighter.

    Besides, the fact is that the OP wanted something other than the typical scull or row boat.
    Have you ever seen the one Buckminster Fuller designed and rowed?
     
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