Pontoon motor position

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Catfish Howard, Nov 14, 2021.

  1. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Maybe you could have something like a large 'launching trolley' which is just for launching and recovery - this could then be pulled on board a road trailer, such as a longer version of what typically might be used to transport a car?
    Sailing dinghies also often have very basic launching trolleys, and the dinghy and the trolley is then carried piggy back on the road transport trailer.
    And you should then be able to drive at 75 mph ok...... :)
     
  2. Catfish Howard
    Joined: Nov 2021
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    Location: Panama City FL

    Catfish Howard Junior Member

    I've already decided to keep my pontoon boat until I buy another one and if I have a trailer like that I'll switch out trailers and keep my original one it's a 2016 anyways which is probably going to be newer than the Pontoon I buy.
     
  3. Barry
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Barry Senior Member

    It is hard to tell from the picture but they are most likely mounted on an 8 1/2 inch diameter rim or a 10 inch diameter rim. (bead to bead diameter) While I am sure that there may be someone making tires to fit the 8 1/2 inch rim in a high load capacity, most tires that fit these top out around 1000 pounds per tire at Load Range D. The 10 inch tires can go to Load Range E and the load rating is around 1500 to 1600 pounds. (again probably someone is making a higher rated tire)
    In any case, if they are the 8 1/2's it is most likely that you are over the load carrying capacity with that boat when including the trailer weight. And probably the same with the 10 inch tires.
    The load ratings, obviously, are set at max tire pressure, normally LR D 50 psi, LR E 70 psi. Because of their high rotational speed than a larger diameter tire, an under inflated or overloaded tire can cause high wear rates due to heat build up, more so where the pavement is hot
    It does not look like a safe set up. Run it across the scales if you are considering buying it to confirm the weight and after a 20 minute run in the sun, stop and put your hand on the tires. If they are quite hot, there is a problem.
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2021
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  4. Catfish Howard
    Joined: Nov 2021
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    Location: Panama City FL

    Catfish Howard Junior Member

    I found a pontoon about 6 hours away and it has 20.5 x 8.0-10. before I head up there I figured I'd go ahead and pick up some new heavy duty E load since I know I'll be adding a lot of weight to the boat anyways might as well go ahead and get them for the trip back.
     
  5. Barry
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Barry Senior Member

    I have had a tandem set up on a sled trailer using the smaller tires for maybe 12 years. Lots of long trips and wore at least 2 sets out rather quickly,
    At first I bought offshore tires and these were a bit of a disaster so splurged and bought, I think Goodyear.
    They outlasted the cheaper tires, no flats and had miles left when I sold the tires. Sometimes paying more up front is the cheaper way to go
     
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  6. SolGato
    Joined: May 2019
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    Location: Kauai

    SolGato Senior Member

    If you’re going to be towing long distances at high speeds (I would advise against towing any boat that big with wheels that small at 75mph), it would be wise to install a set of quality wheel bearings and Bearing Buddy’s.

    Good quality wheel bearings like Timken won’t break the bank and would be money well spent with the higher rotational speeds of the smaller diameter wheel and tire package, and set of properly serviced Bearing Buddy’s (they offer SS now) will protect them after being heated up and submerged which causes the hubs to draw in water.

    Also it is important to note that properly balancing your trailer and boat (or any trailered load for that matter) can really save your butt in the case of an emergency like a blow out, bearing seizure, leaf spring failure (had it happen towing a 30’ Cigarette), fast braking, swerving, etc.. I mention this since you’ll be adding a lot of stuff.

    Here’s a great demo:

    Login • Instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/CWVL4DyoY71/?utm_medium=share_sheet
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2021
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  7. Barry
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Barry Senior Member

    I forgot to mention
    You should check the maximum weight that you can carry without having brakes. I believe that the 8 inch wheels do not allow enough space for a drum/caliper behind the rim. By now perhaps someone has come up with a solution

    So if you buy the trailer and upgrade to 13/14 inch rims and the hub has a backing plate to accept a drum set you might be able to make that work. But you will be buying a bunch of stuff. Probably cheaper to buy a whole axle assembly with brakes than parts, and sell the old one.

    Also check the capacity of the axle. Normally, there is an aluminum/steel stamped
    "decal" with the info on it
     
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  8. Catfish Howard
    Joined: Nov 2021
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    Location: Panama City FL

    Catfish Howard Junior Member

    Well I started looking for tires today had him measure on center and it turns out it's a 5 stud on 5.5" on center (not 4.5") I can't find a tire and rim anywhere. A local store told me I might as well go to a 5 stud on 4.5" and just replaced the hubs with new tires and rims when I go up so I think that's what I'm going to do. They believe that Sun Tracker Trailstar trailer should have a slanted axle bearings. But I going to buy some straight bearings from Walmart that way I have each and I can return which ones I don't use. I'll probably use my pontoon trailer once I get it back which I have heavy duty 13-in tires on but I just need to get it home safely and the tires do not look good on it. I would have a mechanic replace a tire but I won't get up there until late Saturday and most tire places will be closed or can't mount that type of tire
     

  9. Barry
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Barry Senior Member

    If you are replacing the bearings, you should replace the races. A bit of a pain to install but both will fret over time impacting the running surface. I would absolutely doubt that the bearings are anything but roller tapered bearings. Otherwise there is no way to take up the side loading.
    Not sure if you have set up a wheel bearing assembly, so just a cautionary note. You do not put a preload torque on the wheel nut. After everything is in place, run the nut up to maybe 30 foot pounds torque, just to insure that the hub is
    all the way on to the stub axle. Then back it off and continue to do so until you feel slop in the wheel, ie grab the top and bottom of the tire and push on the top and pull on the bottom, there should be a bit of movement. Then turn the nut in until there is no movement, but with no preload. As you have to have the cotter pin hit one of the grooves in the castellated nut, better to be looser than tighten it with a wrench. One axle manufacturer's spec was .001 to .010" of "looseness" between a fixed point of the axle to the upper edge of the hub.
    Do not overtighten or have any torque on the nut, finger tight plus a bit, just to take the slight movement out of the hub assembly.

    Another contributor mentioned Timken or equivalent quality bearings, this is valuable advice. In this case, it might cost you 10 bucks to have a quality bearing than trying to save a few bucks.
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2021
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