Polyurethane Foam

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Bart01, Sep 23, 2008.

  1. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    Design 1, actually, I used to teach the NMMA flotation course in Nashville. Since I retired they got someone else from USCG to do it. So if you took it before 2004 that was me boring you. LOL.

    I was referring only to the RCD for the little inshore boats. Even so there are some differences. For instance, they require you to hang the weights outside the boat rather than in it. And each category has it's own requirements.

    Bart, most production builders don't use pre-made block foam. Most use two part pour or spray foam. The boat mfgs don't make the block foam. They buy it pre-made from the foam manufacturer. On boats with a lot of different sized compartments the 2 part seems to make sense on a production line, but it's the stuff that has the problems. Some of it has to do with not following the foam manufacturer's instructions about cleaning and calibrating guns, temperature and humidity, and making a test block before you start shooting it into the boat. But it goes beyond that because some very well known builders with sophisticated quality assurance programs have had problems.
     
  2. Design_1
    Joined: Nov 2004
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    Location: Georgia

    Design_1 Water Logged Hack

    Well Ike-I am truely honored. And no I did not go before 2005. I avoided it like the plague to be honest with you, no offense I hope. I have actually come to enjoy diging into the regs. It has actually forced me to do homework and research, like being here, as corny as it probably sounds. Now I do wish they were not quite as overwhelming sometimes. But I have began setting up spread sheets for my formulas and set design formats for my priority regs that effect design placement. I think the seminars are boring because it means more to me when I dig through it on my own. You may know an old friend of mine though. What geo region did you cover?

    I understand. The outside weight is what gave us a fit. It was interesting, but it caused me a few issues. That is probably why I have hard feels about it.:rolleyes: It takes me time to get on board someone telling me how, exactly, to design my boat. Well maybe it is just authority in general. But all in all it has made me a more thoughtful designer than I was before.

    So long story short teach on. I am listening.

    regards
     
  3. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    At HQ I had the whole east coast. But I worked with many of the compliance associates that did factory inspections, so shoot me a name.

    We all learn in our own ways and in our own time. I personally prefer structured classes. But I also like researching a subject and then writing about it. It makes it stick in my mind.

    On the RCD flotation test. The results and method aren't much different, just the placement of the weights. But putting them outboard makes it a little harder to pass the stability portion of the test.
     
  4. Design_1
    Joined: Nov 2004
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    Location: Georgia

    Design_1 Water Logged Hack

    Did you work with any of the companies directly? Bill Bowers was the compliance engineer for me when I was at Genmar. He had actually been an R&R shop manager in a shop that I tooled in before we both started moving up.

    Some subjects work for me in a structured environment, and some don't. I am back in school now working on my BFA. I enjoy classes discussing art history and its impact on current design works. But an economics class almost drove me to insanity! Some of it just depends on the enthusiasm of the person presenting the information, and how drug down they get in the details. Give me a good strong overview, wind me up and watch me go. I will make my way through the details. But that is just me. We are all different.

    Being with a smaller company now requires me to know more than I have before. So, I have started studying more and asking more questions. And were ever possible, giving back to the community that has given so much to me.
     
  5. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    I talked to Bill Bowers occasionally, but mostly he talked to Rick Gipe, one of the other engineers (also now retired). At Genmar, I talked to Marcia Kull, Genmars general counsel (attorney) a lot about recalls and other compliance matters, until she left in 2003. Now she works for Volvo Penta.

    I think you learn more at a smaller company because you have to deal with a wider range of subjects. At big companies you get tracked into a narrower slot. I took Econ at the U of Maryland. My prof was part time. He worked full time at the Fed for Alan Greenspan. This guy really knew his stuff. He predicted this melt down 20 years ago. I assume nobody listened.
     

  6. Design_1
    Joined: Nov 2004
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    Location: Georgia

    Design_1 Water Logged Hack

    It would appear none listened indeed!

    I have heard Marcia's name, but not sure that I ever met her. I left Genmar a few years ago because of the direction they were pushing us. I worked for Alan Stinson for a long time, but the corporate thing grew tiresome.

    Well, now I hope you know I will try to pick your brain when trouble arises here.:D

    As you said a smaller company pushes you into a broader scope. Every additional asset is needed. I hope you don't mind if I hit you up from time to time.

    Regards,
    Chris
     
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