plating, how not to

Discussion in 'Metal Boat Building' started by Guest62110524, Jun 16, 2009.

  1. Guest62110524

    Guest62110524 Previous Member

    saw this abomination in France Strangely IT was built in Holland, imagine the welding. It is the only boat In have ever seen plated vertically in strips
    I also got to use this state of the art machine in Poland last week
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2010
  2. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    I've seen other steel vessels here in Asia with vertical strips at the bow. Especially iwo of bow thrusters, not a pretty sight.

    However, if the butts are well supported at both ends and there isn't a long.t strength issue, nor triaxial stress raisers, it "should" be ok.
    It does allow those with less skill to plate more complex curves.
     
  3. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Is it just me, or does it look like the shell has been plated over? An original welded shell should never have relief like that no matter who did it.
     
  4. wardd
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    wardd Senior Member

    I kinda like it more than most boats i see
     
  5. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Yes, odd....i saw the rubbing strake, but didn't see the odd looking shape of plate that appears to be either a thick insert (but no taper) or a bloody large doubler over the hawse pipe!..odd!
     
  6. Wynand N
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    Wynand N Retired Steelboatbuilder

    on par for an ex communist country;)
     
  7. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member

    Oh my gawd

    i only figured out now that the second pic is a welding machine :?:

    jeez talk about suicide kids - wow


    sorry a bit slow this morning - too much epoxy yesterday :D
     
  8. Wynand N
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    Wynand N Retired Steelboatbuilder

    Manie, that gives a new meaning to a buzz box welder...
    I wonder if Stuart can enlighten me if the woman still have chest hair in Poland:?:
     
  9. wardd
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    wardd Senior Member

    i think its macho, a "the hell with what you think" look

    it looks like it came off the liberty ship line

    probably has a single cylinder chug a lug diesel, 2 cylinders at most
     
  10. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It looks like a wooden boat "steeled over". There are many like that in the Great Lakes
     
  11. Guest62110524

    Guest62110524 Previous Member

    No , I think the bottom vert. pl was just lapped over the top (run)
    here is a useful link for SMAW welder
    shttp://www.millerwelds.com/pdf/guidelines_smaw.pdf
    Although I spose it could have been overplated, never looked closely
    Polish woman? some exceptionally beautiful ones , have to face the fact, that,at my age I am invisable to them:))
    The welder, well my friends father(from this site) has had it by him for 60 years
    Dunno if was the machine or the rod, but it ran like very long interval pulse with arc stopping and starting Needless say without my glasses the weld looked like something spattered from aloft
    boat 40 tonne the crane was magnificent computerised state art 10000euros to lift in , they loaded 50 tonne weights to the centre of the crane It is a 200 tonne caqpacity machine
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2010
  12. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    In the last picture, you can clearly see that the stem is rivited. So my opinion is that someone plated over an original furnace plate rivited hull. The "orange peel" sections are needed because you can never roll a plate to match a furnace plate. With the picture of the hull, it looks like pre-war canal boat, so standardized mass construction would not make a furnace plate hull unreasonable.
     
  13. Guest62110524

    Guest62110524 Previous Member

    thanks mate, you may well be right, I hardly paid much attention
    the drama after the launch was something else,
    would youi like a large file vs of pic?
    Not sure what your term furnace pl means Boiler plate?
    Have seen some beautiful fully riveted ships, some of which, the plate lines were perfect I think the Germans had the lasst of the riveted ships
    That 32mm stem bar was needed hours later as she ploughed into rocks, when the astern gear failed
     
  14. jehardiman
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    A furnance plate is a plate which had to be heated and then "bucked" over a mould to give it double curvature. Common on most hulls, riveted or welded, prior to WWII because the heat forming was not overly expensive when plates still had to be hot punched for rivets, joggled for laps, and rolled shapes for frames had to have heat formed joggs also. Most modern post WWII welded hulls are developed with single curvature, and shapes are made up, so furnace work is avoided like the plague.

    A lot of the late German work was actualy composite riveted and welded, with the butts welded, but the seam riveted. The USCGC Eagle (ex Horst Wessel) and her sisters are of this construction.
     

  15. Guest62110524

    Guest62110524 Previous Member

    okey dokey, seen some very nice jelks(sp) joggled
     
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