Plastic boat hull repair

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by John Webb, Jul 23, 2017.

  1. John Webb
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: dallas, Texas

    John Webb Junior Member

    Ok as I look at the damages today, I agree with you. It does look like fiberglass would repair the places. The damage is at least 1/8" in depth but not clear through. My pictures didn't come out very good. I'll still try again tomorrow.
     

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  2. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    There are actual holes you can poke your finger through, did you say ? The boat should have sunk !
     
  3. John Webb
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: dallas, Texas

    John Webb Junior Member

    I am handy and have built furniture items from rough cut timber. Wall nut and Oak sanded to a very smooth finish. finished edges, stained and sanded in between several layers with patients over several days. The overhead work is the only thing I haven't done. I guess I could flip the boat over if that is necessary. I removed it from the offending trailer and placed it on the new trailer on my driveway by my self.
     
  4. John Webb
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: dallas, Texas

    John Webb Junior Member

    I was wrong. The holes do not go all the way through in any of the damaged areas. It was damaged on the trailer and has never been in the water with the damages.
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Unless you "know the ropes" of working with this kind of "goo", you don't want to learn by practicing on the bottom of a boat, really. It is an awkward task working overhead in hard-to-get-at places. And turning the boat over is not really a practical idea. But what is needed here is an experienced eye to assess the extent of the damage, to be able to apply the right remedy. And over the internet, very difficult to say. The thing may need little more than minor repairs, or it could be a write-off, the pictures don't show which. If repairable, the boat would need to come off the trailer, and be safely and properly supported, with adequate clearance to do the job.
     
  6. John Webb
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: dallas, Texas

    John Webb Junior Member

    You have already made me hopeful that it can be repaired at least by someone if not myself. Either way it is going to be repaired and on a lake at least by the end of the summer. I'm going down to the deer lease where I have two other boats stored to check out the engines in them to decide which one is going in the boat. It had a 185 hp. 4 cylinder engine in it and I'm going to upgrade it to at least a V-6 if not a 5.7 l. V-8. One of these two engines will run and fit in this boat. It's a 19' deck boat that was rated for 12 people. I'm just going to take a couple of grand children or my 3 yorkies dogs. 5lbs each for 2 and 3lbs for the third one. I guess I can tell you what I'm doing. I'm 68 and retired. all of the time in the world. I building this boat from free items given away on Craigs list. I got this boat which is the design I want. A large and roomy deck boat. Trailer from another person. A second and third boats with engines that are supposed to run to pick an engine from. I got a high grade in door out door carpeting from the TPC golf clum in Irving that was used for T.V. announcer booths and small stadiums for dignitaries at the different golf holes. It's beautiful light grey carpet that I can glue down to the floor and interior. I have a nephew that does upholstery work. I will cut and fix all of the plywood sub-base pieces for the seating and back support to make the seating. Right now I have all of the components necessary in hand to complete this boat. I'll buff out the hull and it will look great. The whole boat is buffable and will be like new white again. The trailer I got is a heavy duty tube frame, double axle with brakes that works. Blaugh...Blaugh....Blaugh. Have I bored you to death yet?
     
  7. John Webb
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: dallas, Texas

    John Webb Junior Member

    I am going to take your advice and have a fiber glass person look at it because I want it to float and work for several years. You have been so absolutely wonderful and helpful. I'm going to be a happy boater this summer and you have helped. Thank you....Thank you... John
     
  8. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Yes, it is painless to get an assessment and repair cost quote. Or better, two opinions.
     
  9. John Webb
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: dallas, Texas

    John Webb Junior Member

    Thank you. That's what I'll do. Again Thank you.
     
  10. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    OK. good luck with it, and let us know what you find out.
     

  11. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Agreed, by the sound of your questions and comments, you'd be best advised to have that boat looked at by someone with some experence in these types of basic repairs, which are done all the time, with little fuss. To directly answer your questions, yep, that is a 'glass boat (FRP) and you're correct it's plastic or sorts. Technically it's a fiberglass and polyester resin mixture, once cured becomes a tough, flexible material that works well and last for decades. What I see in the pictures is a heavy, old school build, possibly chopper gun, though maybe hand laid roving, depending on year and manufacture. It'll have some wooden elements in her, like the transom core, the soles and stringers below the sole, possibly 'glass covered furniture too. I also see a very poorly fitted trailer. Other than the centerline rollers and bunks, the boat shouldn't touch the trailer and shouldn't be anywhere close to bouncing off it on the road.

    Fiberglass repairs are routine and relatively simple, assuming you have some familiarity with the materials and techniques. You can look them up and maybe practice on some scraps or just take a shot at it, knowing you'll probably have to redo some of it over, as you learn.

    By the look of her and suspected age, you'll likely need just about everything, transom core, sole and stringer replacement, plus hull repairs. This isn't cheap, unless you do it yourself. Additionally, that drive likely came attached to a 181 GM l-4 which is a fine little motor and plenty of them are around as replacements. Swapping it out for a 4.3 (V-6) or a 5.7 (V-8) isn't a good idea, as the gear set in the bottom of that drive is for the little 4 cylinder and will be wrong for the V-6 and especially the V-8.

    In the end, there's nothing free about a free boat and you'll quickly learn what BOAT actually means on your wallet.
     
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