Planking width?

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by BHOFM, Sep 1, 2008.

  1. BHOFM
    Joined: Jun 2008
    Posts: 457
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    Location: usa

    BHOFM Senior Member

    I am getting ready to plank the transom on the boat.

    It is 15"X36" and has a rake.

    For pure ethicists what is the ideal width of the planking
    and should I put a slight bevel on the seam edges to accent
    the planks?

    I have had it covered in random width planks and it looks
    good that way.

    It will be left natural and varnished.

    What are the rules??
     
  2. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    No excact rules btw 1'' to 1'.. better the planks, wider.. "betternes" depending of the quality of the timber and likes/dislikes of the builder :p So no help..:D
    Nice work you doing (following your building thread).
    Teddy
     
  3. BHOFM
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    Location: usa

    BHOFM Senior Member

    Thanks for the reply.

    I used scrap from the framing and came up with this, which
    I like! It is still full 1", I will plane it later.

    As you can see, my material is near perfection! The pieces
    with minor blems I have used as battens and the center
    of the laminations!

    Thanks again for your reply.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    Belatedly, I would suggest quarter-sawn wood no matter what species you use, and in general go narrower if there's no curve across the transom.
    A narrower board, like 6" wide, ensures the cauking won't be asked to stretch or compress too much, but some woods like cedar can be wider without problems (maybe 10").
    I've seen oak used in wide pieces on flat transoms, which is asking for trouble if poorly maintained. There's a reason transoms are sometimes curved, and it isn't all for looks.

    Alan
     

  5. BHOFM
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    Location: usa

    BHOFM Senior Member

    Thanks Alan;

    The planks are 4,2,3 and 5", they are cedar, that is what
    I have to work with.

    The bottom board is backed up to a 5" wide frame member
    and that should be about as far in the water as the transom
    will get, I am just using paint or varnish between the boards,
    they fit very nicely along the seam.

    I bought a large stack of it, 1"X12"X12' rough cut, full
    inch thick that was cut wrong, it was just 11 1/8" wide.
    I paid $7 a piece and it is nearly all clear or just a few
    small knots most of which don't show on the other side.

    I can build several more small boats, or a lot of clocks!
    :p :p :p

    Thanks

    Brad
     
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