pinnace project

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by jim1968, Sep 22, 2009.

  1. wardd
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 897
    Likes: 37, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 442
    Location: usa

    wardd Senior Member

    dry ice

    http://www.coldjet.com/en/information/what-is-dry-ice-blasting.php


    What is Dry Ice Blasting?
    Dry ice blasting is similar to sand blasting, plastic bead blasting, or soda blasting where a medium is accelerated in a pressurized air stream to impact a surface to be cleaned or prepared. But that's where the similarity ends.

    Instead of using hard abrasive media to grind on a surface (and damage it), dry ice blasting uses soft dry ice, accelerated at supersonic speeds, and creates mini-explosions on the surface to lift the undesirable item off the underlying substrate. If you want to read all the technical details, see the How CO2 Blasting Works page.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUwiAVAWLL4&feature=related



    Dry ice blasting has many unique and superior benefits over traditional blasting media.
    Dry ice blasting:
    is a non-abrasive, nonflammable and nonconductive cleaning method
    is environmentally-friendly and contains no secondary contaminants such as solvents or grit media
    is clean and approved for use in the food industry
    allows most items to be cleaned in place without time-consuming disassembly
    can be used without damaging active electrical or mechanical parts or creating fire hazards
    can be used to remove production residues, release agents, contaminants, paints, oils and biofilms
    can be as gentle as dusting smoke damage from books or as aggressive as removing weld slag from tooling
    can be used for many general cleaning applications
    Cold Jet dry ice blasting uses compressed air to accelerate frozen carbon dioxide (CO2) "dry ice" pellets to a high velocity. A compressed air supply of 80 PSI/50 scfm can be used in this process. Dry ice pellets can be made on-site or supplied. Pellets are made from food grade carbon dioxide that has been specifically approved by the FDA, the EPA and the USDA.
    Carbon dioxide is a non-poisonous, liquefied gas, which is both inexpensive and easily stored at work sites.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2009
  2. jim1968
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 6
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    Location: uk

    jim1968 Junior Member

    time to order new timber

    again thanks to all for there good advise. i am just about to order some green oak to replace ribs and beam shelf the sections are ribs 3x3 and beam shelf 4x3 , having never steam bent timber before i thought i might be quicker and easer to laminate these fron 3x1 and 4x1 and plenty of copper fastenings . can this be done if so what would you use to glue them together as i keep reading its hard to glue green oak, thanks jim
     
  3. keith66
    Joined: Sep 2007
    Posts: 332
    Likes: 24, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 168
    Location: Essex UK

    keith66 Senior Member

    You will be a strong man who can bend 3x1 oak, even that will need steaming, get yourself an old stainless beer keg they make excellent steam generators with either a big gas ring underneath or a fire if its set on bricks.
    Steaming large sections of timber such as beamshelves can also be done with polythene tube just slide it over the part & get the steam in. Clamp it in place with the polythene on it & cut it away afterwards. As for glues for green oak i am not sure maybe titebond?
     
  4. Classicpower
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 14
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Canada

    Classicpower Junior Member

    If you strip epoxy oak ribs you are alot better off... You can even scarf the broken ribs and if properly done it will last a lifetime.. Also you can remove the damaged rib and build a jig... Or staple and epoxy strip after strip until you reach the thickness you need... but using green oak may not give you the strength you need and can still warp. Hope this helps
     

  5. westray
    Joined: Dec 2017
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 3, Points: 3
    Location: Orkney, Scotland

    westray New Member

    Hello. Only just come across this thread. maybe no-one watching? sea trials1.  2020.DSCF1676.JPG We have a similar WW1 Harbour Service launch, here in Orkney. Currently afloat and undergoing further restoration. Please reply if you are interested and we can learn more.
     
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