Petrel

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Unregistered, Jan 8, 2004.

  1. Unregistered

    Unregistered Guest

    I came across a Design of a 16 Feet sloop "Petrel" on the website at http://www.svensons.com/boat/
    The description and drawings specify a centerboard for builing by amateurs and alternatively a keel for the more experienced builders. I do not consider myself as very experience, but given the right tips I feel confident of carrying out the job. Hence, I would appreciate any tips or instructions about making the actual keel, type of wood or other materials to use, and best method of fixing it to the hull.
    Thankyou
    Rocco
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    It is more difficult to build a trunk and centerboard than attaching a keel. The easiest keel would be a steel plate welded to a flat flange with the shape of the bottom.
     
  3. Rocco

    Rocco Guest

    alternative

    Thanks for your assistance Gonzo
    I suppose that if I use a steel plate with flange, there is no need to be for it to be the size as that shown in the drawing. Maybe I can go for a shorter one with a ballast at the tip.
    Building on your idea, if I were to remain loyal to the original design by using the wooden keel, can I build it up of say nine layers of 2 inches thick planks bolted though using half inch stainless steel bolts. I welcome any suggestion.
    Thanks again
    Rocco

     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Stainless is a problem below the waterline because of crevice corrosion. Bronze or hot dip galvanized are better. For a built-up keel just epoxy glue it together. The keel bolts will go through everything anyway.
     
  5. Rocco

    Rocco Guest

    Fine

    Hi Gonzo,
    I wish to thank you for your assistance. I can now start turning my dream into reality. I see you come from Wisconsin USA. In contrast, I live on the tiny island of Malta in the Mediterranean. The first time I saw Petrel Plans was in an advert of Naval Architect Percy W. Blandford way back in the mid seventies.
    Thanks again
    Rocco

     
  6. Burkie
    Joined: May 2010
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    Location: Ireland

    Burkie Junior Member

    Hi Rocco,
    I happened to post another query about Petrels,as we sail them here in Dungarvan Co Waterford ,Ireland,they were originally a design taken back from the US in the late 50's there were at least 50 of them built here ,mostly plywood ,then fibreglass.

    There was no problem with the centreboard boxes once they were securely fixed,they were made of 3/4 inch ply but now the fact that uou can epoxy inside before assembly makes them perfect,the only thing is to use some types of bracket at the aft of the CB box & maybe stainless brackets midways.

    The only other caveat is that the shape & size of the CB need to be altered,the blade is very wide front to back ,so if it was narrowed and made longer ,your boat would sail better & react faster,check the size of a Wayfarer CB. The other thing is that having a narrower CB there is more room between the CB box and the boom when tacking to get from one side to another,they narrowed the CB's here but didnt lenghten them ,so the boats made leeway.
    I'll try & post some pics.
    I have just renovated a fibreglass one & now me & abuddy are renovating an old ply one.
    If you are a new build ,use epoxy & woven roving overlaid with straight weave on outside of hull with plain weave inside & you can make if of 1/4 inch ply as a stitch & tape method.
    I could make real size patterns from our one & send them to you on paper templates if you like I also have a few modifications /improvements for your consideration.
    Btw wehad four Petrels out sailing this evening there are only about 10 to 12 left in total now.

    Regards

    Eugene
     
  7. Burkie
    Joined: May 2010
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    Location: Ireland

    Burkie Junior Member

    Hi Rocco ,just saw that the thread is a few years old,I'd still be interested in how you got on & if you had any pics.
    we might have an international event !!

    Eugene
     
  8. jmskydancer
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Jurmala, Latvia

    jmskydancer New Member

    Burkie, you alive? I am building Petrel now. Can we get in direct contact somehow?
     
  9. Burkie
    Joined: May 2010
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    Location: Ireland

    Burkie Junior Member

    Hi JM,
    I sent you an email last week,glad to hear that you are building a Petrel,theyre a great boat. Very safe,good fun,will get up to good speed & will also plane & also a great family day boat.
    I was out sailing in one yesterday afternoon in Force 5 to 6 winds -up to 28kmph We had her planing & nearly got it surfing on the larger waves.

    As I think I said already I was going to build one myself & had all the research on materials etc & new building methods ready ,when I got a gift of a clinker-lapstrake- 1953 classic sailing dinghy to restore & I was doing that last summer,( launched in August) so I now dont need my own Petrel,I have the use of three of them at any time anyway.

    Basically the CHEAPEST,EASIEST & STRONGEST way is to make the frame patterns out of old plywood-12mm will do.
    Then mark out your panels & fit as per plans & stitch & tape them using nylon cable ties.

    When the hull is complete & all the cable ties sanded off sheath the outside of the hull with BI AXIAL WEAVE 450 gsq M fibreglass cloth.
    Ideally epoxy resin would be the best to use ,but for one tenth of the price you can use Polyester resin (marine grade) I can give you all the suppliers details & they post to Europe too.

    Finish off the final coat of resin with a MICRO BALLOON powder additive for easier sanding ,then turn it over,REMOVE the plywood,fibreglass ALL the inside of the hull,fit a bulkhead forward of the mast,with detatchable panels,I'll show you how to do it ,then fit another bulkhead at the aft of the cockpit & fit a plastic lockable rectangular hatch in that.

    At this stage you can alter the design by making narrower gunwhales ( side decks & fit a box type ply seat lower in cockpit or finish off directly down from side deck coamings to the floor ,& seal, then either finish will provide you with additional bouyancy.
    The latter method is better if you are going to sail her hard as if you do capsize you take in less water & its easier to right the boat as well.
    Get a second hand aluminium Fireball mast & make a 3 metre boom from timber,-EASY-
    Will show you how
    I can also give you details & pricelist for sails from "Hong Kong Sails" they're very cheap & use excellent materials,also they have a big range of colours too.
    Other main factor is the centreboard size shape DONT use the original design,its not designed too well & it makes life akward for the crew tacking,I'll send you plans for one similar to a Wayfarer one & show you how to make it work.
    This way you save a fortune on stainless steel screws & fittings as basicallly you have a composite plywood /fibreglass boat,the beauty of glassing all the plywood is that you dont have to use Marine Grade BS 1088 ordinary class 2 exterior grade will do fine & you save a load of time making & fitting frames plus the cost of materials,the stem can be laminated from strips of 10mm ply.
    Let me know that you have received my emails & if youre on Skype I could talk to you.
    All the best

    Eugene
     
  10. Burkie
    Joined: May 2010
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    Location: Ireland

    Burkie Junior Member

    Petrel,

    Hi JM,

    Have put post on forum,

    Eugene;)
     
  11. locksafe
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Location: polokwane, south africa

    locksafe Junior Member

    Petrel 16 ft Sailboat

    Hi Burkie .
    This thread is a bit old but i am going to try anyway -
    Nice to hear from someone that actually sailed the Petrel Sailboat.
    As far as i know the Petrel 16ft was designed by a gentleman called
    William D. Jackson - a Naval Architect from the U.S.A . He designed a lot of Boats for both Sail and Power and worked as a Naval Architecht for the US Navy during the 2nd World War . He was also a Boat builder and built most of his Designs himself. His designs was almost always aimed at the home handyman and was therefor simplified so that the ordinary man could build himself a boat in his Backyard.
    I want to build a Petrel for myself and therefor would like to know how the Petrel sails compared to a similar boat like a Wayfarer (Another excellent boat but no Plans available) if one has changed the Center board like you suggested ?
    I am sure that the Petrel could be built in the stitch and glue manner wich would result in a much lighter boat especially if one uses 6mm ply Coated with fibreglass instead of the 9 mm ply specified by the designer.
    do you have the Wayfarer center board specs or sizes available to you ?
    I would really like to hear more from you regarding the Petrel and the Modifications that you guys there at your club has done over the years of actually sailing and using the boat .
    I would also like to look at a Balanced Lug rig or Standing Lug rig with jib for the Petrel for dinghy cruising .
    I am from South Africa and would highly appreciate it if you could share your obvious wealth of information about the Petrel with us here on the forum .
    thanks and fair winds
    Hannes
     
  12. GenePARK
    Joined: Sep 2017
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    Location: Oregon

    GenePARK New Member

    Back in the late 1960s I was working at the Golden Hind Boatel (sic) just north of Inverness, CA on Tomales Bay. A chap pulled into the boat shop towing a Petrel centerboard sloop.
    He had warped the centerboard to the point that it could not be lowered due to binding on the center board housing. The centerboard was made of a heavy sheet of steel that pivoted on a huge bolt.
    We removed the centerboard to try to straighten it but no joy. What was needed was a foundry to heat the steel to try to straighten it. Or replace it all together.
    I was rather taken with the wee boat and contacted the designer for study plans. It has a hard chine hull. Quite a few years later, thinking I had spare time on my hands, I drew up the rib forms to make the forms to attach to a frame to make the rubs etc. Unfortunately, the necessities of life intruded forcing me to abandoning the project,
    A few days ago I found the framing templates and with some more searching I may find the study plans. If I recollect properly that name of the designer was Armstrong.

    petrel centerboard sloop - Google Search https://www.google.com/search?q=petrel+centerboard+sloop&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en&client=safari#imgrc=uqLopX0WFJs6iM:
     

  13. GenePARK
    Joined: Sep 2017
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    Location: Oregon

    GenePARK New Member

    Today whilst sorting through old papers, I found the Petrel file. There is a letter from Mr. Robert E. Armstrong consisting of details and specifications. Also several blue pages showing a ketch or cutter rig and as sloop rigged daysailer.
    The specifications state 30' LOD and 35'n overall. Included with letter is large folded plan consisting 8 x 11 sized business paper. I'm going to see if my cheap printer/fax is up to stitching the pages together.
    I think I could fax the spec. pages, though some have faded as they were printed during the latter half of the 1960's.

    Gene Park
     
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