Petrel - My first boat! (Yes, I have medical insurance)

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by knightyo, Oct 16, 2011.

  1. knightyo
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    knightyo Junior Member

    Thanks guys! I just placed an order for the epoxy from Clark Craft. I'll definitely spread epoxy on the screws before driving them in. That was an awesome tip. I'm thinking of taking my Dremel to the pilot holes a bit so the screws will seat deep enough that I can spread wood flour/epoxy over them in order to "seal" them in while at the same time providing a nice smooth look when sanded, stained or painted. That might be overkill however, which is one of my tendencies. :)

    And Catbuilder... If you pitched in for airfare, I'd probably take you up on your offer if you lived near the coast. :D


    Edit: The text of the plans indicate to use 1/2" x 1 3/4" carriage bolts to secure the frames together at the chine corners, and 1 1/2" flathead screws at the keel/floor frame. The large carriage bolts would sure be more substantial than the smaller screws I was considering using, but of course wouldn't (I don't think) hold the soft pine frames together without a lot of tightening/denting of the wood. Thoughts?
     
  2. LP
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    LP Flying Boatman

    Don't increase the fastener size thinking you'll have a stronger boat. All you'll do is make the boat heavier. If you're using epoxy where the plans are calling for marine glue, you'll have a stronger structure where the fasteners are acting more as clamps and may become secondary to the glue joint itselt. That being said though, try not to stray too far from the plans. Your boat was designed to be held with mechanical fasteners and random application of epoxy may not blend well with this more traditional style of construction.

    I've always like the appearance of Petrel and will be eager to see your progress.
     
  3. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    You may want to just bung the holes rather than epoxy the heads in. If you ever have to take something apart you will have to drill out the screws if you cover the heads with epoxy. You can't get it out of the bit holes.
     
  4. knightyo
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    knightyo Junior Member

    You are exactly right; I'm using epoxy; the plans called for Marine glue, so we are ahead of the game structurally, I think. That being said... I'm tempted to use the recommended carriage bolts rather than the screws I was thinking of... They would definitely be heavier than screws.. but they are what the plans call for.. But as you say, the joint will be a lot stronger w/ the epoxy rather than the marine glue anyway..... I'm not sure on this one...

    It's really going to be fun to post progress pics. You guys will have to let me know when you would like to see pics of any aspect I don't cover very well; I'm a pic junkie, so it's fun for me! It's also extremely helpful for me to have you experienced guys watch everything that I'm doing so if I do anything crazy you can let me know. Lol

    Wow, that is an excellent point. If I do indeed use screws, I will definitely bung them in rather than cover them w/ epoxy. Thanks!
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Actually, bunging is a pain in the butt, just epoxy them over and I'll tell you why. Bungs fall out, raise up and need to be carefully installed. If you need to remove a screw under thickened epoxy, just heat up an appropriate tipped screw driver (one you don't like so much) with a blue tipped wrench, until it's glowing red. Then push this, hotter then a hooker, out side a GM plant on payday tip, into the epoxy over the fastener head. The red hot tip will melt right through the epoxy and you can easily engage the slots. If you left the red hot tip on the screw for a few seconds, the heat will also soften the epoxy on the threads, making twisting it out a piece of cake. The softened epoxy will come out with the fastener head and the hole process is uneventful. Naturally, you don't want to touch the shaft of the heated screwdriver.

    The only time I bung (unless I'm drinking heavily), is on surface that will be brightly finished and that are thick enough to receive a bung. 3/8" is about as thin a material as you can use for bungs, while still having sufficient meat under the fastener to effectively hold it down.
     
  6. knightyo
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    knightyo Junior Member

    Par, I love your descriptions of things. :D

    I went to the hardware store yesterday to find stainless steel carriage bolts. I got into a conversation with an employee there who really questioned me as to why I'd used carriage bolts rather than traditional nuts/bolts. He was saying that the carriage bolts could pretty easily strip and spin over time and could be a pain to remove; especially in the soft pine frames I'm using. Thoughts?

    I now have 3 sets of frames cut out. I'm just waiting for the epoxy to arrive before I start assembly. I feel kind of like it's Christmas already!
     
  7. LesPetrel
    Joined: May 2012
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    Location: Indianapolis, IN

    LesPetrel Junior Member

    Petrel too

    I've just run across this and hope I'm not too late. I've got a Petrel that I am just finishing up. The standing rigging is done and most of the running rigging is up, the main sail is done and I'm working on the jib now. I started out building the cabin version but once I got to mocking up the cabin I realized I'd have a hell of a time even sitting up in it! So I just eliminated the cabin and now have an open boat with the cabin mast position and sprit. If I can figure out how to post a pic I'll show what I've got.
     
  8. knightyo
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    knightyo Junior Member

    You aren't too late at all! I actually had to put the project on hold when I entered the MBA program at the last minute... Now that it's summer I can actually get to work again! I can't wait to see pics of your version!

    Alan
     
  9. LesPetrel
    Joined: May 2012
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    Location: Indianapolis, IN

    LesPetrel Junior Member

    Glad to hear it! Got a pic with this one, trouble sorting out where I had what as I just got my computer back up and running, I was using my laptop which is a backup. Mine is the centerboard option, I made it quite a bit smaller than what the plans show, would have stuck up above the coaming otherwise. But I made it out of plywood with a large steel block that I had laying around. Have the jib done now, just been lousy weather here so I haven't bent it on yet. Still need to run the sheet blocks and fairleads for the jib, have the main on a cable traveler, we'll see how that works out. This is also my first sailboat so I'm going to be real slow in getting it up to sailing speed:D
     

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  10. cthippo
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    cthippo Senior Member

    Yay! Actual pictures of boats being finished! Congrats Les and get after it, Knight!
     
  11. LesPetrel
    Joined: May 2012
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    Location: Indianapolis, IN

    LesPetrel Junior Member

    Thanks, been a long road, looking forward to learning how to sail this thing.
     

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  12. knightyo
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    knightyo Junior Member

    GREAT construction pics! I can't tell you how happy I am to know someone took pics of their build. That makes me feel far more confident in what I am about to undertake!
     
  13. LesPetrel
    Joined: May 2012
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    Location: Indianapolis, IN

    LesPetrel Junior Member

    I do have more if you like, just tell me what you want. I can't say I'm any kind of expert but I have built this boat!
     
  14. knightyo
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    knightyo Junior Member

    I'd actually love to know what method you used to attach the frame components together. Bolts & Marine Epoxy?
     

  15. LesPetrel
    Joined: May 2012
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    Location: Indianapolis, IN

    LesPetrel Junior Member

    Nah, took the cheap route, Titebond II and brass screws. Read a glue test and epoxy only came out a bit ahead of Titebond II so I saved the epoxy for where it would do the most good, where my joints weren't perfect. The skin to frame joints and fillets and such are all epoxy.


    It isn't whether you win or lose, it's whether I win or lose!
     
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