Pete Goss: back to origins.

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Guillermo, Jan 5, 2008.

  1. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    Pete is building a wooden lugger and following in the wake of seven Cornishmen who made a heroic journey to Australia 153 years ago. Proud of his West country roots and an enthusiastic wood-worker, the project is something Pete has wanted to do since he heard about the inspirational voyage of the Spirit of Mystery.

    The vessel will be as true to the original Mystery as possible and, although there will be concessions to safety, there will be no engine, toilet or modern electrical and navigational systems.

    More at: http://www.petegoss.com/mystery/
     

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  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The sailing skill of these "glory days of sail" adventures can not be under estimated. These were folks much more in tune with the sea, wind and vessel then we can understand. Most sailors don't get this element of these grand treks, until they actually have sea time on antique craft. Most are very unstable, wet and quite wild rides, which relied heavily on skipper and crew skill to keep them upright.

    The "golden age" sailors were so much more skilled then us, that direct comparison is difficult. My first recommendation for the romantic sailors among us, is to get out and log several weeks of helm time on an antique. Not a "looks like and antique", but a real reproduction of a known vessel and then tell me you wouldn't want to increase its ballast/displacement ratio, lower its CG, etc. Those old salts were incredible seaman, much of who's senses have been lost in time.

    I'm reminded of the Santa Maria logs in 1492, which noted the pumps were manned 15 minutes (on avarage) out of every hour and this was considered normal. Or the ridiculous craft Slocum rounded the world in. About as unsuitable a boat as could be selected, just proving how masterful his seamanship and more so, his navigation skills were.

    Taken with not just a grain of salt, but the whole salt shaker.
     
  3. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Mostly by rote and repertition as much as anything else! Lets face it when all you know is how to pull an oar, reef a sail, mend a net or steer. You do eventually become rather good at it. I'm not taking anything away from the old time sailor but you do have to take it into perspective! These days were doing all that plus.....no wonder we ain't so good at it!

    Must wander over to Millbrook to see the family and see how the ex bootneck (Pete is an ex Royal Marine) is getting on with 'Spirit of Mystery'
     
  4. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Launching the 'Spirit' next Saturday (21st June), late on (about 1900) hope all goes well - I may even manage to get there!! - Try keeping me back!!
     
  5. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    I think Pete made excellent choice:D Not much to increase with 37'/16tons and CG could be lower, but CE is looow..
     
  6. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    You're missing the point - it's a replica doing the trip again!! A few hundred of this class of boat were built, by eye, on the beach, and CG's CE's and other mathematical stuff were simply "I want a boat that long, that wide and looking like that one, when can you deliver?"
     
  7. yipster
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    yipster designer

    when going there and you will, have a good day
    think you could consider informing me on pete's promised book
    of a certain big blue lost bi-plane cat may be comming of the ground?
     
  8. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    I will follow with a lot interest Spirit of Mystery's trip.

    My friend Iñigo Echenique (NA) designed and built a 8.5 m dorna to cross the Atlantic in 2004, also without engine or modern instruments, just seventeenth century fashion navigation (even cloths!), but he didn't find the needed support and the dorna is languishing in the port of Cambados, waiting for better times to put miles under her keel. A couple of weeks ago I went to visit it. It's in good shape and being lovingly used and maintained by the Galician Federation of Traditional Boats' Associations, but looking sad while waiting to fulfill her dream.....

    For sure not a home from home here, as there are no bunks, not fresh food, not even a shade except under the forward deck, which is only able for laying as it is only a few decimeters height.

    See: http://www.americaendorna.com/ (only in spanish)

    Cheers.
     

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  9. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    No I didn't.. but you missed my point:D

    Que linda barco este dorna!
     
  10. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Your point being? It was a stanard lugger much used at the time, no diferent from many others around the coast - well there was a big difference in some ways - the St' Ives lugger was pink sterned, most cornish luggers had transoms, made em a little bit more seaworthy; but there again there was many a scottish lugger with sharp or ink stern - all of em in fact! Different shapes for diffent conditions! Made to suit the locals - no book learning involved!
     
  11. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    It's not so unusual I don't make myself clear to everyone (=most people), and I'm so used to that:D
    My point was that if someone want's to remake a historic sea journey with an authentic boat, man could make many much worse choices than choosing this one.
     
  12. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Ah yes! True! Typical Celtic craft (bit of Norse in there too I guess) been known for doing mad things have the Celts - all of them! Ask Guillermo, especially when the sea is involved! As for Pete Goss, local boy, ex Marine, has a bit of a repatation does Pete! Ther's sme makeing bets he won't get past the Plymouth Sound Breakwater - but I think he'll make it, drekkly! I kow one thing, he'll have fun doin it and he'll get some other bugger to pay! Cornishman see (well retread then) bit like some others from the forgotten Southeast Corner!! No names mind!!
     
  13. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    Pete Goss has had letters from the descendants of the original Mystery and been given the sextant they used. He will use it for navigation, with no use of weather forecasts.

    He's in need of funding. Mike: You should bring with you a bunch of Celtic friends to the launching and buy some of the Cornish tin medallions they are selling. :)

    Cheers.
     
  14. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Guillermo the majority of my friends actually live in the village the boat was built in!! the party is being held in their football clubhouse!! Alas the way the weather is this evening there's not much chance of me making it! the wife has put her foot down with a firm hand that there's no way she's going to stand in the rain with howling winds etc watching some boat being launched (actually she could watch most of it from number two son's front room!!) So being a bit of a wimp (the things we do to keep the peace!) I guess I won't be going either!!
     

  15. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    Like most of us, don't worry. :)

    Still no photos from the launching in the site.

    Cheers.
     
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