Peel-Ply Removal

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by bluwtrlynn, Feb 7, 2005.

  1. bluwtrlynn
    Joined: May 2004
    Posts: 2
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    Location: Seattle WA, USA

    bluwtrlynn New Member

    I am getting ready to lay-up some superstructure panels from foam-epoxy-glass for a fishing boat to trawler project. I will lay the glass up then vacuum bag to, hopefully, save sanding. I will use peel ply on the outboard surface which will eventually be painted. My question is how long I can leave the peel ply on? Does it have to be removed when the glass is still green? Can I leave it in place until I am ready to paint, possibly several months, to protect the surface from collecting?
     
  2. Ssor
    Joined: Jan 2005
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    Location: Bel Air, Md

    Ssor Senior Member

    I always leave it on until the resin is cured but never had occasion to leave it on long term. If it is shielded from UV degredation I suppose you would be alright but nylon doesn't have much long term resistance to UV. If it broke down you might find that it would not be storng enough to pull without tearing. It does give a nice smooth finish.
     
  3. AVMan
    Joined: Sep 2004
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    Location: Georgia

    AVMan Junior Member

    Peel Ply

    Some composite sandwich panel manufacturers purposely leave peel ply on after manufacture so that the builders will have a clean bonding area when they need it, no "shelf life" is ever given (at least to my knowledge), but as bluwtrlynn says, if its been exposed to intense UV for extended periods of time you might have trouble removing it.
     
  4. bluwtrlynn
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: Seattle WA, USA

    bluwtrlynn New Member

    Thanks

    We don't get too much intense UV here in Seattle. Just kidding. Actually the boat is tented so I probably don't have anything to worry about. I'll just check periodically and strip the peel-ply off if it seems to be falling apart. Thanks for the input. Lynn
     
  5. Ssor
    Joined: Jan 2005
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    Location: Bel Air, Md

    Ssor Senior Member

    Lynn, you really need to pull it off about a week before it starts to fall apart. What you need to find is a "failure anticipator". ;)
     

  6. fhrussell
    Joined: Dec 2004
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    Location: Long Island, NY

    fhrussell Boatbuilder

    peel-ply quality

    also, take into account the quality of the peel-ply. i purchased some awhile back that was at a much lower price than i was used to paying and it only comes off with quite a bit of muscle. if this stuff were left on for very long, it would be a real challenge to remove if it deteriorated. i like to leave it on until i'm ready to prime and paint, leaving an uncontaminated surface when it's removed. with the less expensive peel-ply, i've been removing it within 48 hours of application.
     
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