Peak Fish - some good news

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by rwatson, May 10, 2014.

  1. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Its nice to see some good news in the world of Aquaculture.



    http://www.abc.net.au/landline/content/2014/s3984247.htm


    The problem - no more wild fish available for aquaculture feed -


    "PIP COURTNEY: Aquaculture is the world's fastest-growing food-producing sector, now contributing 35 per cent of total fish production. But aquaculture's very success has put pressure on the fisheries it needs to keep growing.

    NIGEL PRESTON: A justifiable criticism about aquaculture is that the continuation of catching wild fish, grinding that up and feeding to farm fish. Now that has been done pretty well around the world, but there aren't any more wild fish.

    PIP COURTNEY: You've probably heard of peak oil, when the world's maximum rate of oil extraction is reached. Well, world aquaculture has hit peak fish.
    Demand for wild harvest fish meal and fish oil now outstrips supply. "




    A real horror story of the problems in SE Asia

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/a...ting-prawns-Youll-right-tell-THEY-fed-on.html

    "Load upon load of putrid fish and decaying marine creatures is poured into fetid storage containers. Every now and then you spot the eye of a beautiful coral fish or the glint of a long-dead starfish as the noxious mess is crushed and passed through a series of ovens until the final product — fish flour — is obtained.

    Transformed into pellets, this is then driven to the prawn farms that have all but destroyed Thailand’s mangrove forests."




    Now, the good news

    http://www.abc.net.au/landline/content/2014/s3984247.htm

    "A new superfood is set to turbocharge the world's farmed prawn industry.

    This special non-fish formula developed by the CSIRO makes the crustaceans grow up to 40 per cent faster. And, what's more, it tackles one of aquaculture's biggest problems: its reliance on wild fisheries as a source of food.

    NIGEL PRESTON, CSIRO: Using this material, they get their prawns to market to 30 per cent faster or they could have a prawn that's 30 per cent bigger.

    PIP COURTNEY: And all farmers have to do is switch to a new fish pellet.

    The Novaq recipe is a closely-guarded secret. But Dr Preston will reveal it's based on microscopic marine organisms.
    "
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    They could always feed them on pig manure, which is popular in Asia. Still hungry for a feed of farmed fish ? :D
     
  3. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Hmmm...
    Uh-oh.
     
  4. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Oh - I get it - thanks Google
    Soylent Green is a 1973 American science fiction film directed by Richard Fleischer and starring Charlton Heston,

    You bet - lets cut out the middlemen and the expense, and just eat the "microscopic marine organisms". If its good for Prawns .....
     
  5. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Middlemen, that's good.

    I'm not sure if you realize what the movie was about, but the ending line was "Soylent Green is people!"
     
  6. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    I have never seen the movie, but I gather from your comments that they weren't wasting 'food resources' - like car accident victims etc
     
  7. pdwiley
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    pdwiley Senior Member

    That's because the movie was a total piece of crap and anyone with a knowledge of literature would know that.

    The movie was very, very loosely based on a book by Harry Harrison titled 'Make Room, Make Room' and was an early Dystopian sci-fi novel.

    Soylent Green was *not* based on ground up people.....

    PDW
     
  8. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Au contraire.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soylent_Green

    And, as everybody who knows anything knows, this alleged 'total piece of crap' rates a 71% on the Rotten Tomatoes Tomatometer, which puts it well into the 'fresh' category.

    http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/soylent_green/


    .
     
  9. pdwiley
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    pdwiley Senior Member

    Look, if you want to argue with me, at least do it intelligently. Here's a quote from that wiki reference you provided:

    "The film, which is loosely based upon the 1966 science fiction novel Make Room! Make Room! by Harry Harrison,"

    So, I am correct in my statement WRT the movie's origins.

    Now, as I have actually *read* the book and you, obviously, have not, I know what was in it and where Soylent Green in the book actually came from, and you do not. It was not ground-up people.

    If you want to refute me, it's a simple matter to do so. Quote *from the original source* in Harrison's novel the passage that says Soylent Green was made from processed humans, and I will admit to faulty memory.

    Otherwise, drop it and have the grace to admit you're wrong.

    PDW
     
  10. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    I don't have to argue with you, you seem to be busy enough arguing with yourself. I never said the movie wasn't based on the book. Any slight look up of the movie will tell you it was based on the book. You seem to think that since that piece of "literature" came first, the movie doesn't count, so you can't seem to realize that I was talking about the movie and not the book.

    But, since you have read the book, please quote *from the original source* in Harrison's novel the passage where "Soylent Green" is mentioned in it anywhere. All I can see is a few references to "Soylent Steak", a concoction of soy and lentil beans. "Soylent Green" is exclusive to the movie and in the movie the fact is "Soylent Green Is People!"

    I thought Soylent Green was a sort of humorous observation to compare to Dr. Preston's closely-guarded secret fish food recipe. It kind of seemed similar, both 'claim' to be made of plankton, both are desperate attempts to use up the last of the world's resources in inefficient efforts to feed an overpopulated world while overlooking any reasonable solution to the problem.

    I didn't realize the sci-fi book "Make room! Make Room!" was such a timeless, monumental, world class, get your panties all in a wad masterpiece of literature that it apparently is.
     
  11. thudpucker
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    thudpucker Senior Member

    What if we stopped burying people? Instead, using the Corpse's for fish food?
     
  12. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    If it comes to that, it's time to give up eating fish. The chances of perpetuating human defects would probably make that a bad idea.

    The solution would be to drastically lower the population one way or the other, but that won't happen voluntarily.
     
  13. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Cant - too many - heavy metals.
     
  14. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Poor cannibals, they get heavy metal poisoning ?
     

  15. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    and Kuru
    "Kuru is an incurable degenerative neurological disorder endemic to tribal regions of Papua New Guinea ..... It is now widely accepted that Kuru was transmitted among members of the Fore tribe of Papua New Guinea via cannibalism. "

    Most large vertebrates concentrate heavy metal.

    For you pet owners, heres a worrying analysis of Pet Food

    "Both the veterinarian and I were convinced there was something in the food that was causing the problem. A private lab showed that the food contained excess levels of zinc, 1120 parts per million (ppm), a level that would have caused the dogs' symptoms. It also contained over twenty other heavy metals. The pet food company stated they were not responsible."
    http://conspiracygeek.blogspot.com.au/2012/07/cannibalism-in-pet-food-industry.html

    When you read where your pet food comes from, you may be sick.


    Also
    " cremation can result in nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, particulate matter, mercury, hydrogen fluoride (HF), hydrogen chloride (HCI), NMVOCS, other heavy metals, and Persistent Organic Pollutants (POP) being released into the atmosphere? To combat the environmental impact of cremation (not to mention traditional burial), Glasgow-based Resomation Ltd has installed its first commercial “alkaline hydrolysis” unit, called The Resomator, at a Florida funeral home which dissolves bodies instead of burning them."

    http://inhabitat.com/choose-liquidation-over-cremation-save-the-environment-even-in-death/
     
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