Patterson 21' Trimaran Plans

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by redreuben, Jan 19, 2015.

  1. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
    Posts: 3,200
    Likes: 203, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 579
    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    I believe I saw a discussion on the same basic geometry of the folding system.
    Since it was just a sketch, there was little acceptance.
    Seeing one in the flesh makes it seem more acceptable, but it would be great to get some first hand description of it in use.
    To me it is clearly derived from a Farrier system, but one of his earlier iterations.

    I'm wondering how you pull up the dagger board with it so close to the base of the rotating mast?
     
  2. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
    Posts: 3,200
    Likes: 203, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 579
    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    A basic question about sailing, I hope someone has experience.
    On a daysailing multihull - Tornado- it is critical to be able to shift your weight backward and forward to get the best performance, and to survive sticking the nose underwater.
    I understand that the main hull has lots of freeboard so sticking the nose will not be a real issue, but with all the weight centered, the ama bow will also be driven down.
    Looks to me like the wind you can accept without reefing will be reduced with the weight concentrated in the middle.

    Please educate me.
     
  3. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
    Posts: 1,813
    Likes: 136, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 349
    Location: South Lake Western Australia

    redreuben redreuben

    Do you reckon this is kind of a 20' Verbatim ? (Crowther 40)
     
  4. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
    Posts: 1,813
    Likes: 136, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 349
    Location: South Lake Western Australia

    redreuben redreuben

    Upchurcher;
    I had similar thoughts, perhaps put water tank under rear berth ?
     
  5. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
    Posts: 3,200
    Likes: 203, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 579
    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Red,

    Given that the center cockpit limits your movement that might be the only option besides just sailing more concervatively.
    Seems to me that you would need a fairly quick acting system to respond to gusts.
    I suppose in practical terms the more cruising oriented boat would primarily be sailed less agressive, or you would fill the tank for average conditions on a reach and sail a little less conservative, then dump the water for other points of sail as appropriate.

    Marc
     
  6. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 16,679
    Likes: 342, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 1362
    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Notice anything about this picture of the P21?
     

    Attached Files:

  7. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
    Posts: 3,200
    Likes: 203, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 579
    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Its a boat?
    No, what?
     
  8. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 16,679
    Likes: 342, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 1362
    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Mast seems a lot further aft than on most tri's....
     
  9. rcnesneg
    Joined: Sep 2013
    Posts: 456
    Likes: 6, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 58
    Location: Utah

    rcnesneg Senior Member

    The mast far aft seems to be a common theme on high-performance trimarans, especially as you go for the maxis.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 16,679
    Likes: 342, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 1362
    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    P21

    The point is that the aft mast position would help prevent pitchpole/nose down attitude as discussed in post 32.
     
  11. ThomD
    Joined: Mar 2009
    Posts: 551
    Likes: 20, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 111
    Location: TO

    ThomD Senior Member

    Did the plans get found. I corresponded with him a while back, and he offered them to me. I think it is a really neat boat, and was just what I was looking for at the time, but had a design of my own I was working on, so I passed.

    He had sailed her 8000 miles, and had trailered her 15000. He said plans would be around $200, in 2010.
     
  12. ThomD
    Joined: Mar 2009
    Posts: 551
    Likes: 20, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 111
    Location: TO

    ThomD Senior Member

    I don't think the center cockpit is a problem. It is the ideal set-up when tris get small, a for and aft cabin is the best use of space. If you want to sail it like a hobie, you are probably somewhere out of the nets anyway, or you have bodies to move around. Newick used this layout in his smaller tris, the tremolino being the best known, but there were several versions of that, and several other tris with the center cockpit to boot. B2, Argonauta, another one I have plans for somewhere.

    Basically he has the cockpit a fair bit back, then he had a reasonable front cabin, versus the Newick approach of putting the main cabin aft. In this kind of layout you want the daggerboard in the cockpit floor, and then you need to match the rig to that, so it comes back a little too.
     
  13. Dan Williams
    Joined: Jan 2015
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Hawaii

    Dan Williams Owner Wa'a Kaulua LLC

    That is actually John's boat that he built after he had a 33 footer called Kinetics that had a similar center hull shape. the amas were pretty round (picture a supercat 20 but a little fuller up front and 30' long. it was a beautiful boat that I sailed on in lake st. Clair in Michigan. we would fly the center hull in about 8 knots of wind. I have a copy of his original drawing of the hulls and first sketches of the crossbars. He had sold this boat and the new owner sailed it up on a breakwall and destroyed it.
    I scaled the drawings down and my brother had a 28' footer built but added headroom to stand up in the center hull. It's sitting in a barn in upper Michigan if anyone is interested. the ama's are Inter 20 hulls with 3' added to the sterns to make them 23'. The boat has a F28R carbon mast that was cut down a foot (due to damage from previous owner).
    Regarding the 21 he sold the boat to his brother who didn't pay for it so John took it back and sold to someone else but I don't know who that was.
    John's son Adam manages everything for John so, I would start there since John is enjoying retirement on his own design/build 30 something tri in the Caribbean
     
  14. saltdragon
    Joined: Oct 2014
    Posts: 18
    Likes: 1, Points: 3, Legacy Rep: 18
    Location: UK

    saltdragon Junior Member

    I assumed this was always more of a 'daysailor' type of yacht, with possibly the occasional night aboard or maybe week down the coast if the weather suited, but basically a performance boat with somewhere to store your dry clothes and have a cup or glass of something, a 'man shed' an escape capsule. I would assume in that case one would rarely go in search of maximum speed or the limits of stability. Perhaps I'm just getting old :(

    Whilst in this reflective mood, as a flight of fancy, how about this tri with Gary's free standing double wing mast rig ('periauger' ? - L.F. Herreshoff). Stuart.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 29, 2015

  15. rapscallion
    Joined: Oct 2006
    Posts: 504
    Likes: 15, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 132
    Location: Wisconsin

    rapscallion Senior Member

    The center hull somewhat reminds me of a scaled down D32 by Kurt Hughes. Dan Williams, Can you post pics of the 28' footer? Do you have any idea how much the boat weighs?
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. Doug Lord
    Replies:
    51
    Views:
    27,956
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.