Painting Cypress

Discussion in 'Materials' started by pwillie, Mar 11, 2015.

  1. pwillie
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    pwillie Junior Member

    I am at the point of painting my cypress dory,and would like some help in slecting a good paint...and should I seal it with epoxy beforw painting?
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It depends on the type of construction. If the wood needs to swell with moisture, epoxy is not a good idea. If you are encapsulating the hull, then it works OK. However, cypress is a very soft wood. If you don't put at least a 6oz cloth, the epoxy will crack and let water in to create rot.
     
  3. pwillie
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    pwillie Junior Member

    Thanks for the reply,but what I'm talking about is a saturation not any cloth are such...
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Use a good quality outdoor house primer and outdoor porch and deck enamel over it. A minimum of two coats of each, preferably more, especially if raw wood. Previously painted surfaces just need a quick prime and paint, but raw wood need, to have the primer "pushed" into the surface, so the top coats will have a good base, with a firm grip. If brushing, use lots of pressure on the first coat when stroking it. The same with a roller, lots of pressure on the first coat, again to push the paint into the pores of the wood.
     
  5. JR-Shine
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    JR-Shine SHINE

    PAR's got it right.

    One other "trick".... roll the hull out in the sun (or get it warm some other way), then bring it inside before coating. Cooling wood will absorb the paint/primer better, it also will keep any out-gassing bubbles from popping up
     
  6. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    A very thin cut on the first coat of primer can help too, maybe 5% - 10% at most. The important thing is to grind the primer into the surface as best as practical, knowing full well you'll need to sand and smooth things up with initial coats. Do worry about runs, drips and sags, just get the surface covered and primer pushed into the surface. I've rarely had issue with primer outgassing, but the warming trick works well, especially with initial epoxy coats
     
  7. pwillie
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    pwillie Junior Member

    So, you're saying to use a house paint? Instead of a marine epoxy type?:confused:
     
  8. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Any good quality alkyd enamel will do fine. I use industrial enamels usually called "tractor paint". They are smellier but dry faster.
     
  9. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Most marine topside paints are alkyd not epoxy and yes, the regular old house paint trick has served many a commercial fisherman over the decades. It's cheap, available, easy to apply and available in colors even Martha Stewart can enjoy. A good primer and surface prep is the real key to a paint job looking good and lasting well.
     
  10. pwillie
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    pwillie Junior Member

    Thanks Par,and all you folks for your replies...Pics will follow...
     
  11. pwillie
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    pwillie Junior Member

    Getting close tp painting the bottom...two weeks maybe...will post pics when I get it started...
     

    Attached Files:

  12. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    Some of the cypress outdoor furniture I've built was painted with Rustoleum and not even the marine kind. Worked well for several years before needing recoating and is very inexpensive.
     
  13. pwillie
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    pwillie Junior Member

    Thanks, I will look into it...
     
  14. pwillie
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    pwillie Junior Member

    Here is the bottom(just before it was righted..)after it was righted...Using Jack Tar paint with a dab of penetrol...seems to work okay.Soon to be finished...!:D
     

    Attached Files:


  15. pwillie
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    pwillie Junior Member

    More pics.... I have completed the first coat(prime coat)and will let it dry for a week..
     

    Attached Files:

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