Paint Vs Varnish (Wooden Hull)

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Josh Goodswen, Nov 18, 2021.

  1. trip the light fandango
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    Location: Rhyll Phillip Island Victoria Australia

    trip the light fandango Senior Member

    Welcome, my caveat is I'm not as experienced as most folks here but here goes,
    Only take off the paint that is suspect and repaint when all joins and repairs are done, so probably don't varnish the lot, great for masts though, to watch for problems.

    The advise I was given was ,.. a very thorough clean then every day for a week, every week for a month, every month for a year, paint with boiled linseed oil and turps, more turps to start, to help it take up, warming linseed oil makes it thinner.
    It will go almost black on the surface but it can be sanded back for varnish. As far as the timber not taking up because of paint or varnish, the only one that can keep out water is epoxy, 3 coats carefully applied to all timber surfaces ,particularly end grains, sides. not really possible for an old boat.
    When the boat is close to getting back in the water a salt water sprinkler system with a trap to recycle the water under the boat is one way of getting the timbers to take up. Or buy salt and paint that on in between the sprinkler system running. It's normal for the putty/ sealer to get squeezed out then the boat is taken out of the water faired and repainted. it's a lovely boat.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2021
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I'm not sure the "Moreton Bay sharpie" was strictly a sharpie in the sense of the simple boat with a flat bottom, some may have been, others not, but all got lumped into the same category. Basically displacement cruisers.
     
  3. Josh Goodswen
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    Josh Goodswen Junior Member

    Certainly can as I go along and show progress, yep she has a 70cm draught and a straight fishing type keel, she was sold to me as a Sharpie but any other oppinions are welcome, good for bays, a little bit further out, estuaries and rivers.
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Years ago an old fella told me of the terrors of crossing a notorious bar in such boats, Going out was rather less problematical than returning, this bar was known to break over a fairly wide area, and even carefully picking the lulls between sets was sometimes not enough to get back through, an eagle eye would be kept behind, and if they started rearing up, the boat would be quickly swung around and motored slowly out again, until the danger was past, and the inward journey resumed, this sometimes had to be done several times. The problem being that the wave train was travelling faster that the boat's maximum speed. Sounds a bit "hairy" to me, but that was what they were dealing with before planing boats were the norm.
     
  5. Josh Goodswen
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    Josh Goodswen Junior Member

    I suppose it's going to be a case of getting to know her when she's afloat Mr E? Lets see?
     
  6. Josh Goodswen
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    Josh Goodswen Junior Member

    Thanks so much, these details are what I need to learn and reinforce from everyone TT LF!
    Yeah MR E. she's quit narrow 3m tops at the widest, very nice shape for cutting the water, very shallow V underneath, with that short straight keel running mid forward to stern?
     
  7. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Are you up the Noosa River ? Do you know how it got down there from Sandy Straits ? Two bar crossings if on the water, too much excitement I would think. In any case, I would stay clear of the Noosa Bar.
     
  8. Josh Goodswen
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    Josh Goodswen Junior Member

    She came down by truck, ha ha ha. I think a couple of times a year worked around high tides. J.
     
  9. Josh Goodswen
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    Josh Goodswen Junior Member

    Hi Guys,
    doing a bit of planning. Rooky question. With an in - board cruiser, if you use an outboard as auxilliary. What should your usual rudder do in relation to the outboard height and position.
    Should you steer with the outboard and lock the usual rudder in position or the other way round etc. When organising an outboard transom, should the outboard prop mach the depth /height of the master prop?
    Any knowledge on this question would help.
     
  10. trip the light fandango
    Joined: Apr 2018
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    trip the light fandango Senior Member

    Gosh Josh you have lots of background reading to do , there's heaps in this forum, an outboard has a depth partly predetermined by the length of shaft in part , the prop has to be far enough under the water to avoid cavitation but not drown the motor. The rudder works best with the prop forward pushing water past it but just using the outboard depends on how much power it has , even then the rudder has more surface area leverage/ water flowing past it, bear in mind there is no steering if the boat speed and direction is the same as the current.
    Use both tillers because there may not be much steering if there's any weather about. I think these questions will test some folks patience, luckily we're all boating tragics, ha. Ahh the river... The rudder tied off straight or let loose will eventually follow the developed hull speed/direction of the propeller. Any wind or crossing going against current will easily overpower[lots of drift] most steering with say a 6 hp outboard or less on your boat,[4 knots] especially with a bit of chop/cavitation. Get a few rides on a similar boat to get a feel for it. A bigger slow prop will push better[efficient/more control] for your boat speed. 8 knots? 2 tons wet?
    I guess you have 4 inches of[full] keel running the length of the boat. Nice boat Josh. prepare to be obsessed captain.
     
  11. Josh Goodswen
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    Josh Goodswen Junior Member

    Thank you Fandango, trying to gather as much info as poss so I don't turn a whiter shaed of pale to often when I'm actually on the water. Lovely info please keep it coming folks.
    And yes becoming more and more deeply obsessed.
     
  12. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    A propeller that is too shallow may ventilate, not cavitate. That is a common misunderstanding on how a propeller functions. Cavitation is due to excessive blade loading and/or excessive velocity. Ventilation is cause by air getting sucked down by the low pressure at the forward face of the blades. Ventilation can be used to prevent cavitation. For example, in surface piercing propellers. If you are planning to use the boat on rapids and crossing sandbars, an outboard will be hitting the bottom on a regular basis. A jet drive would be a better option to prevent damage. I do bridge inspection, and we run our boats in shallow water a large percentage of the time. Our propellers rarely last more than a week of work. If you are using a propeller, the cheaper aluminum ones are best. The alloy is softer and the blades break or bend, usually saving the gears from damage.
     
  13. Josh Goodswen
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    Josh Goodswen Junior Member

    Cool thank you, I intend to use the regular inboard and shaft, I just needed opinion on using an outboard as auxilliary/get out of dodge if the main motor, for what ever reason should clunk out on me or stop?
    Foolish thought?
     
  14. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    lock the ob; use the rudder, go out to sea and learn how it behaves before trying it around other vessels

    also depends on main use of ob

    for trolling, as above

    for emergency backup; you can go the other way if you can reach the tiller
     

  15. Josh Goodswen
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    Location: Noosaville QLD

    Josh Goodswen Junior Member

    Thanks fallguy! Good plan.
     
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