Paint recommendation

Discussion in 'Materials' started by jtheriot, May 4, 2018.

  1. jtheriot
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 1, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: New Orleans

    jtheriot Junior Member

    I'm looking at what would be my best route on a coating for a commercial boat. For the sides I'm going with awlgrip because it doesn't receive wear like the inside. I'm trying to get away from gelcoat because daily cleaning with dawn and a little bleach strips it quick and stains are inevitable. Using boat soap and waxing is not a option. Ideally something somewhat tough like gelcoat but without the porosity to resist staining would be ideal. I thought about awlgrip with flattening agent but thought someone might have a better recommendation. Thanks for any input.
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Commercial boats usually use alkyd enamel. Awlgrip is quite expensive. What kind of work does the boat do?
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    Gonzo is right, most commercial boats use a good, moderate quality alkyd, simply because they know they'll need to do it again in a few years, so why get the $300 a gallon stuff, when the $50 a gallon stuff will do as well.
     
  4. jtheriot
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 7
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    Location: New Orleans

    jtheriot Junior Member

    Boat is used for commercial crabbing in Louisiana. I tend to go overboard with details and finish quality throughout just because that is how I am. I spent probably 150 hrs on my current boat fairing and spraying awlgrip on the hull. It's been 7 yrs and still looks great when other gelcoat boats in the same environment start to look rough. I'm building a new boat now using epoxy and composites throughout so I don't mind spending extra for quality. I use stainless on work areas that receive impact and wear that no coating could withstand. Usually if I want the decks and floor to stay looking very good I need to sand and gelcoat every 2-3 yrs. During the workday most the deck and floor stays dirty with mud from traps. Day after day the mud bakes in the sun and the stains get worse over time. Since straining over time is my main problem vs wear I was wondering if a 2 part epoxy paint or awlgrip would work better for my application. From a commercial prospective using the most cost effective and just slapping on more is normal but my boat is kind of my hobby so any ideas regardless of price is a option. Thanks for the responses and anymore input.
     
  5. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Epoxy is not ideal outdoors because the UV will make it fade and chalk. I prefer IMRON to Awlgrip because it is much easier to use. Particularly, it has a whole family of additives and reducers that allow to match for weather conditions.
     

  6. jtheriot
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 1, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: New Orleans

    jtheriot Junior Member

    I was thinking of going imron this time because I hear more saying they prefer it. Seem most everyone that uses it are pleased with the results.
     
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