Outfitting Weight of Passenger Ship

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Rounak Saha Niloy, Sep 11, 2022.

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  1. Rounak Saha Niloy
    Joined: Mar 2022
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    Rounak Saha Niloy Junior Member

    I have to estimate the Outfitting Weight of some passenger ships (L = 45-55 m).
    This is the formula of estimation that I have got-
    upload_2022-9-11_19-8-14.png
    What is the measure of gross registered volume here? Does it mean the volume of the hull up to deck + volume of superstructures? or only the volume of superstructures?
     
  2. Heimfried
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Heimfried Senior Member

    The multiplication of a coefficient given in ton/m² with a sum of volumes given in m³ will not generate a weight (nor a mass) but a number relating to a unit "ton meter". To me the formula is wrong.
    May be the unit of the coefficient should have been ton/m³.
     
  3. Rounak Saha Niloy
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    Rounak Saha Niloy Junior Member

    I understand. It should be ton/m^3,
     
  4. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

  5. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Registered tonnage is a function of local laws. It has no relation to any actual weights. Is the formula what Australia requires?
     
  6. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    what is definition of "Outfitting Weight" in this context? Is it various "hotel" type furnishings not part of the ship? Example all the stuff not yet installed in the 80-90% finished Global Dream II?
     
  7. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    I think that a passenger ship can be roughly broken down as :
    1) Steel weight - all of the steel work (and aluminium probably in the superstructure) in the hull and decks, including all the framing, bulkheads, mooring bollards, railings etc
    2) Machinery weight - propulsion engines and generators
    3) Outfit weight
    4) Deadweight - this would include all of the crew and passengers and their baggage, and all of the fuel, oil, water (including in the pool(s)) and the stores (food, drink etc)

    So the outfit would be all the hotel furnishings and fixtures, including galleys and bathrooms and such, but also the ship items like the anchor / rope windlasses and cables, anchors and chains, lifeboats and tenders, liferafts, electrical equipment on the bridge perhaps (or maybe this would come under machinery).

    But in a shipyard when they are doing their estimating of weights they will have many more sub-categories, and it will be very detailed.
     

  8. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    sounds like Outfitting Weight could vary by at least 3x depending on how pimped out it was hotel wise with also "money buys weight" VS lower cost but heavier items. I'm wanting to convert a standard full size van to RV, but I'm going minimalist fly-weight, removable, fold up and out of way VS traditional built in heavy particle board.
     
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