Our Oceans are Under Attack

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by brian eiland, May 19, 2009.

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  1. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    NASA images reveal shocking scale of Aral Sea disaster | Fox News
     
  2. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Yes, it is counting.
     
  3. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    example: about 100 children?

    Life guard to police, " yes I counted them passing through the gate. 100 children entered the lake's swimming area, and about 100 returned."

    The definition of counting you are using is synonymous with "including", not tallied.
    "c : to include in a tallying and reckoning <about 100 present, counting children>"
     
  4. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Astral sea?
    In Florida much damage was done to the Everglades.
    Other marshes and wetlands are also diminished.
    Humans can damage their local habitat.
    So, how does this justify lying?
     
  5. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

  6. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    "the work being carried out today at NOAA’s fisheries science centers meets the threshold established in law—it is the “best available”—

    Far cry from accurate, which the article clearly points out, recent errors and the continuing problems assessing (estimating) fish stocks is due to lack of valid technology to count fish. Doing the best they can.
     
  7. myark
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    myark Senior Member

    Bottom-fishing fleets in United Kingdom waters today have to work 17 times harder to catch the same amount of fish as their sail-powered Victorian counterparts did, according to a new study.

    To address innovations have made fishing more efficient over the years, the study authors devised a new measure: units of "fishing power."

    After analyzing historic catch records from England and Wales, the researchers conclude that the amount of fish caught per unit of fishing power has fallen by 94 percent since 1889.

    That doesn't necessarily mean the number of fish along the seafloor, such as cod and haddock, dropped by 94 percent. But it's probably "a very good approximation," lead study author Ruth Thurstan, a graduate student at the University of York in England, said via email.

    The decrease in catches is "truly shocking," given how much more efficient fleets have become, Thurstan said in a telephone interview.

    The statistics sting all the more because they involve not just one species but an entire section of the marine ecosystem, she added. The U.K. seafloor could be undergoing a wholesale shift as a result, with exploding populations of baitfish and crustaceans, for example, taking the places of their former predators.

    For better or worse, the Britain isn't alone in the fisheries decline.

    The fisheries is "very much in line with what studies have shown in other ecosystems," said Andrew Rosenberg, a University of New Hampshire marine-sciences professor who wasn't involved in the new study.

    "We've seen the same thing in the western Atlantic, in the North Sea, and in the Baltic," said Rosenberg, a former U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) fisheries manager. "In the Mediterranean you probably have even greater declines."
     
  8. myark
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    myark Senior Member

    It is not an overstatement to say the most important fish in the ocean is Menhaden; they’re the smallest fish in the ocean and are twice as valuable when eaten by larger fish than when they’re caught by humans because they provide food to striped bass, osprey, bald eagles, brown pelicans, and others. Striped bass (also known as rockfish) and osprey have suffered for want of Menhaden and due to man’s greed today these species starve to death.

    FACTS: 37% of worlds catch is this tiny forage fish, 90% are processed into fish meal & fish oil, to feed livestock and farmed fish. Today Menhaden are in steep decline: 50 years ago 90 billion were a year old or less, 25 years ago there were less than 70 billion, and today there’s only 18 billion left. Numbers decline fast. 70% + of fish caught in nets were Menhaden in the 1980′s. By 2006 Menhaden accounted for less than 27% of catch.

    Forage fish are an important link in food chain, as plankton eaters they are consumed by larger fish like tuna, cod, seabirds, dolphins etc. Seals excrement becomes plankton manure, small fish & larvae eat plankton and so a food chain is born. Its interesting to note that Swordfish begins life as larvae.

    Menhaden is processed into Omega-3 fish oils. If you take these pills YOU have a hand in killing our oceans too. Most people do not know Omega-3 fatty acids in natural seeds are actually healthier than the Omega-3 fatty acids in fish http://loverawfood.wordpress.com/2008/04/08/plant-sources-of-omega-3/. We should boycott companies like Omega Protein Corp because they netted 160,000 tons of Menhaden — that’s 80% of approximately 450 million fish harvested, this has led to collapse of populations of larger fish, birds and other predators.
     
  9. myark
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    myark Senior Member

  10. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Hollywood beckons, imo. I see you fitting nicely into one of those epic gladiator-style movies ! :D
     
  11. myark
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    myark Senior Member

    "And I've smoked for more than 50 years! Still do."

    :confused:

    Picture of lungs after 20 years of smoking
     

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  12. myark
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    myark Senior Member

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  13. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Nah. I'm not a body builder, not photogenic, can't fake emotions, and not interested in going to California.
    I'm just a healthy old man with strong principles. Good genes help with the healthy part.
     
  14. myark
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    myark Senior Member

    Harvesting squid, shrimp and some types of cod from the oceans is done with trawling, a process that basically rakes up all life forms the sea floor, killing everything, and creating dead zones. For every one pound of shrimp eaten, 10 pounds of bycatch (species people weren’t trying to catch) are killed.
    Farmed fish doesn’t have the bycatch issues but is usually raised in chemically treated water, treated with pesticides, and full of antibiotics. It takes two pounds of wild fish to feed one pound of farmed shrimp.
    With that in mind, you can try Sophie’s Kitchen product with a clear conscience.
     

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  15. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    You don't know what you are talking about, myark.
    I bet you can't name the parts of a trawl and their intended purpose, or even describe the different kinds of trawling methods.
    What's the differences in benthic trawling, demersal trawling, pelagic trawling and pair trawling?
    And your 10 lbs of bycatch for every pound of shrimp caught is another outrageous LIE!

    I usually carry a trynet and castnets on my tugs, and sometimes butterfly nets.. You probably don't know what those are either.
     
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