Our Favorite Quotes

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by dskira, May 19, 2010.

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  1. myark
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    myark Senior Member

    Hey humans
     

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  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Try again myark, chimpanzees are more closely related to humans than gorillas, and they eat meat. Haven't you seens those docos where they pull little monkeys apart ?
     
  3. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.
    Benjamin Franklin
     
  4. myark
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    myark Senior Member

    What do chimps eat?

    Unlike other apes such as gorillas and orangutans which are almost entirely herbivorous (plant-eating), chimps are classified as omnivores. This means that, like humans, they eat a variety of plant and animal foods.


    While the vast bulk of the chimpanzee’s diet is made up of plant foods including fruits, seeds, nuts, leaves and flowers, they will also eat insects and even larger animals that they have hunted and killed themselves.

    The world’s foremost authority on chimpanzees is Dr. Jane Goodall who, beginning in 1960, studied them for decades in their natural habitat. Very early in her work with chimps, Dr. Goodall discovered a startling new answer to the question “what do chimps eat?” when she observed them using thin sticks to fish termites out of a termite mound. Until that time, chimpanzees had been considered to be strict herbivores just like the other great apes.
     

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  5. myark
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    myark Senior Member


    "My refusing to eat flesh occasioned an inconveniency, and I was frequently chided for my singularity, but, with this lighter repast, I made the greater progress, for greater clearness of head and quicker comprehension. Flesh eating is unprovoked murder." Benjamin Franklin
     
  6. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    You win myark, tofu burgers here I come !
     
  7. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    “Live a good life. If there are gods and they are just, then they will not care how devout you have been, but will welcome you based on the virtues you have lived by. If there are gods, but unjust, then you should not want to worship them. If there are no gods, then you will be gone, but will have lived a noble life that will live on in the memories of your loved ones.” ― Marcus Aurelius
     
  8. myark
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    myark Senior Member

    Thanks for that, I am in Perth at the moment, good people good country

    The link is my son Myark just before he was five who has never eaten meat or fish in his life.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZS9RwwPI_IA

    One quick look into the body of a true carnivore will show you that humans are herbivores and have adapted to be omnivores, but we're not built to successfully eat animal flesh. We do take advantage of our dominion over them to catch them by any means we can, but we are not anatomically built to eat animals.
    One of the least educated arguments I've heard against veganism is the, "humans were made to eat animals" theory. People tell me this quite seriously and I think they truly believe that our bodies are designed to devour other animals.
    True carnivores are built with specialized body parts to help them kill, rip apart, and digest other animals. One of the easiest ways to demonstrate this concept is through pictures- take a look at our body parts and compare them to the parts of carnivores like sharks, lions, tigers, falcons, hawks, eagles, crocodiles, wolves, foxes, and polar bears. Are they closer to the parts on herbivores like horses, donkeys, goats, sheep, cows, zebras, elephants, rhinoceroses, deer, and rabbits?
    Carnivorous animals often use their limbs to assist with catching and killing of prey and thus have sharp claws, talons, or nails made to latch onto another animal, hold them down, and rip them apart.
    Omnivores and herbivores have flat feet with blunt fingernails to protect their fingers from objects bumping or poking them. Sound familiar?
    Humans have soft hands with thin nails that protect our fingertips. Nothing like the talons and claws used to grip and tear at flesh...
    Carnivores have sharp, thick teeth used to tear flesh into large chunks. Think of lions, tigers, and sharks that have extra layers of teeth so that when they aggressively rip apart an animal and their teeth break, they have extras for the future.
    Omnivores and herbivores have flat teeth used to grind and mash food. Herbivores don't have sharp incisors because we don't need to tear animals apart.
    If we eat something too hard or stiff, our teeth break and aren't replenished with new ones.
    Carnivores have a short digestive tract which allows meat to escape the body before rotting inside.
    Omnivores and herbivores have long digestive tracts which allow the body to break down protein, fats, and carbohydrates.
    Also in the interest of clearing food as quickly as possible, carnivores are designed with smooth digestive tracts, without any bumps that could trap the meat and cause it to sit and rot in their stomachs. They don't need fiber to help process their food; it just slides through the digestive tract.
    Herbivores have bumpy digestive tracts with pockets which allow plant matter to get caught and take longer to be digested so all the nutrients can be absorbed into the body. Herbivores need to eat fiber so they can successfully push food through the digestive tract.
    Carnivores have high acidity in their stomaches and in their saliva, which helps to break down animal food.
    Herbivores have alkaline saliva and stomach acidity to help process plant matter slowly, pulling out all the nutrients.
    Humans actually have adapted to be able to eat both meat and plants, turning us into omnivores, even though our bodies are much more similar to herbivores. Now, in the wild, this would mean that we would eat mostly plant matter and would eat a very small amount of meat matter. In today's society, this is completely flip-flopped in the other direction.
    Most people eat mostly meat products. You may think I am exaggerating, but think of all the milk, eggs, and meat that you actually eat. Usually it's a breakfast, lunch, dinner, dessert, and snack thing. We eat tons of it without even realizing it. And, we don't eat nearly enough plant matter.
    Because humans are herbivores, our bodies simply crave more of the plant matter. Without it we develop diseases and die at younger ages.
     
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  9. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Humans do things with food that no other animal does, notably cooking it ! The fact that the taste buds of many people find meat agreeable suggests a long history of it beiing an acceptable part of the diet. Tofu on the other hand.........little joy for the old taste buds there !
     
  10. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    Interesting discussion, not sure what it has to do with quotes, but there's a big difference between the vegetables we eat, which are at least as domesticated as our animals, and the vegetable matter that animals in the wild eat.

    Sure we can probably eat what chimpanzees eat, they're our closest evolutionary cousins. But take a look at the fangs on a chimpanzee, they may not compare to a leopard's teeth but they don't look like ours.

    Evolution has had its way with us. We have continued to evolve all the while we have been farming and raising domestic animals, selecting for the best flavours and textures all along the way, not always consciously. We have modified ourselves and the process is continuing.

    We're the only herbivore adapted to eating cooked vegetables and pretty well as much meat as we like. The changes aren't complete yet, we can still revert perhaps, but there'd be a big dieback.

    Having said all that, I think it's appropriate for a species with illusions of intelligence and personal worth to raise domestic animals in a more ethical manner than we do at present. That would raise the cost of meat, which would have the side effect of reducing our consumption, with side benefits to our health and consequent down-the-road economic gains for all, even the farmers, plus less farming land devoted to vegetables with more available for poor and starving people. Unfortunately, that would also lead to more humans on the planet. Ah well, there's always a downside.
     
  11. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    LIVE SCIENCE | Chimps Prefer Cooked Food

    405
     
  12. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    The worst wheel of the cart makes the most noise.
    Benjamin Franklin
     
  13. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    So because we don't have claws and fangs to take down prey with, we aren't designed to eat meat, Myark? Sorry, but that's a total crock. We're armed with minds and opposable thumbs instead, which together make us more deadly than any other predator that's ever lived.

    Meat has been part of the human diet for the entire history of our species. It's a little late and a little silly, to try to tell us now we aren't designed or equipped for it.:p
     
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  14. myark
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    myark Senior Member

    Read this below again slooooooowwwlyy, also you should read imaginary numbers excellent point’s slooowwwlllyyy.

    One quick look into the body of a true carnivore will show you that humans are herbivores and have adapted to be omnivores, but we're not built to successfully eat animal flesh. We do take advantage of our dominion over them to catch them by any means we can, but we are not anatomically built to eat animals.
    One of the least educated arguments I've heard against veganism is the, "humans were made to eat animals" theory. People tell me this quite seriously and I think they truly believe that our bodies are designed to devour other animals.
    True carnivores are built with specialized body parts to help them kill, rip apart, and digest other animals. One of the easiest ways to demonstrate this concept is through pictures- take a look at our body parts and compare them to the parts of carnivores like sharks, lions, tigers, falcons, hawks, eagles, crocodiles, wolves, foxes, and polar bears. Are they closer to the parts on herbivores like horses, donkeys, goats, sheep, cows, zebras, elephants, rhinoceroses, deer, and rabbits?
    Carnivorous animals often use their limbs to assist with catching and killing of prey and thus have sharp claws, talons, or nails made to latch onto another animal, hold them down, and rip them apart.
    Omnivores and herbivores have flat feet with blunt fingernails to protect their fingers from objects bumping or poking them. Sound familiar?
    Humans have soft hands with thin nails that protect our fingertips. Nothing like the talons and claws used to grip and tear at flesh...
    Carnivores have sharp, thick teeth used to tear flesh into large chunks. Think of lions, tigers, and sharks that have extra layers of teeth so that when they aggressively rip apart an animal and their teeth break, they have extras for the future.
    Omnivores and herbivores have flat teeth used to grind and mash food. Herbivores don't have sharp incisors because we don't need to tear animals apart.
    If we eat something too hard or stiff, our teeth break and aren't replenished with new ones.
    Carnivores have a short digestive tract which allows meat to escape the body before rotting inside.
    Omnivores and herbivores have long digestive tracts which allow the body to break down protein, fats, and carbohydrates.
    Also in the interest of clearing food as quickly as possible, carnivores are designed with smooth digestive tracts, without any bumps that could trap the meat and cause it to sit and rot in their stomachs. They don't need fiber to help process their food; it just slides through the digestive tract.
    Herbivores have bumpy digestive tracts with pockets which allow plant matter to get caught and take longer to be digested so all the nutrients can be absorbed into the body. Herbivores need to eat fiber so they can successfully push food through the digestive tract.
    Carnivores have high acidity in their stomaches and in their saliva, which helps to break down animal food.
    Herbivores have alkaline saliva and stomach acidity to help process plant matter slowly, pulling out all the nutrients.
    Humans actually have adapted to be able to eat both meat and plants, turning us into omnivores, even though our bodies are much more similar to herbivores. Now, in the wild, this would mean that we would eat mostly plant matter and would eat a very small amount of meat matter. In today's society, this is completely flip-flopped in the other direction.
    Most people eat mostly meat products. You may think I am exaggerating, but think of all the milk, eggs, and meat that you actually eat. Usually it's a breakfast, lunch, dinner, dessert, and snack thing. We eat tons of it without even realizing it. And, we don't eat nearly enough plant matter.
    Because humans are herbivores, our bodies simply crave more of the plant matter. Without it we develop diseases and die at younger ages.


    Of course humans can kill and eat animals as a child knows they have done in ancient history with sharp sticks and clubs including wiping out another species of man and now in modern times, guns knives atomic bomb as in japan or our self’s in the near future with nuclear weapons.
    A fine example is the Vietnam war with the slaughter, torture and **** of village after villages, mainly women and children just to get a body count for the governments. burning down each village on their killing spree.
    Wars have rained on earth alongside human meat eaters "deadly predator" .
    Cannibalism was also normal to some humans just recently

    "As long as there are slaughterhouses, there will be battlefields." -Leo Tolstoy

    “To be a vegetarian is to disagree — to disagree with the course of things today. Starvation, world hunger, cruelty, waste, wars — we must make a statement against these things. Vegetarianism is my statement. And I think it’s a strong one.”
    ~Isaac Bashevis Singer, author, Nobel Prize 1978
     

  15. Dirteater
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    I simply agree.
    having said all that :), you can quote me on this ...

    "I believe there are two toasters, two televisions, two cars, two blankets for every man, woman and child on this planet."

    DE

    a side note: we just don't think globally :D
     
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