Orlando Clipper Capacity

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by scenic, Dec 20, 2011.

  1. scenic
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: Orlando, Florida

    scenic New Member

    Does anyone know the capacity rating for a 1955 Orlando Clipper 12' open v-hull aluminum boat?
     
  2. philSweet
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Beaufort, SC and H'ville, NC

    philSweet Senior Member

    Kind of a funny question. Is there a story behind this? Most of the times that question gets asked here are "after the fact".
     
  3. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    1955 was before the US Coast Guard capacity plates were required. I don't know when the industry voluntary standards started.

    Information on how the capacity for new boats is calculated can be found in the USCG Boat Builder's Handbook http://www.uscgboating.org/regulations/boat_builders_handbook_and_regulations.aspx The Coast Guard used to publish a Backyard Boat Builders guide which had simplified calculations for use of folks not building boats for sale. The Coast Guard no longer provides it but it is still available on online. http://files.dnr.state.mn.us/education_safety/safety/boatwater/backyardboatbuilders.pdf

    There are two sets of requirments for new boats. One is the maximum capacity based on the volume of the boat, the other is the floation required if the boat is swamped which depends on the stated capacity.
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    It's fairly easy to get a very close approximation if you can provide the physical dimensions of the boat.
     
  5. scenic
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: Orlando, Florida

    scenic New Member

    Thank you for your responses to my question on capacity. I now realize the old boats just listed motor size on the id plate. I was hoping they would list capacity in a brochure or manual that someone was aware of. The formula I found was " Length X Width /15" which suggests that 600 lbs. is the approximate total capacity. If there is a better formula please inform me. Thank you.
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    600 pounds would be typical in a boat of that size.
     
  7. scenic
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: Orlando, Florida

    scenic New Member

    Orlando Clipper repair

    Thank you for your response on capacity. One other question. The boat we just bought needs some TLC. Do you know anyone who will do aluminum welding and fabrication on a boat in the Sanford, Florida area? Thank you
     
  8. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    Yes there is a better way. Look at the backyard boat builders book mentioned. If that link doesn't work it is also at http://newboatbuilders.com/docs/backyardboatbuilders.pdf. It mentions the bucket method.

    What you do is float the boat in shallow water with nothing in it. Using a calibrated bucket (a bucket that has gallon marks on it. You can get them at Home depot) fill the boat with water until water starts to come over the transom or gunwale. Count the buckets and multiply times the number of gallons per bucket. Multiple the number of gallons by 8.

    That will give you the amount of weight to sink the boat.

    Divide by five. That gives you maximum weight capacity. Subtract the engine weight. Look it up here http://newboatbuilders.com/pages/table4.html Use the figure in Col6 for your engine horsepower.

    Subtract that weight from the maximum weight capacity to get maximum persons weight.

    Persons weight plus 32 divided by 141 is the number of people.

    There is another way if you are just looking for persons weight.
    Stack weight along one side of the boat until it leans over and water starts to come into the boat. Divide the weight by 0.6 (or 10 times the weight divided by six). That is the persons weight. Then:

    Persons weight plus 32 divided by 141 is the number of people.

    If the boat is 2 hp or less, find maximum weight capacity
    subtract 25 lb
    take 9/10 of that to get persons weight.
    Persons weight plus 32 divided by 141 is the number of people.

    Or use the method above by healing the boat with weights.

    See http://newboatbuilders.com/pages/load.html for more info. On my web site are two projects building small boats that show all the calculations for load. http://newboatbuilders.com/pages/Dinghy.html http://newboatbuilders.com/pages/fl12.html
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2011
    1 person likes this.

  9. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Scenic, there are a number of welders in the Sanford and surrounding areas, one in particular that I like. What will you be welding on your boat, as most should be riveted? Contact me by email (click on my name) and I'll pass along some phone numbers.
     
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