Origami steel yacht construction

Discussion in 'Metal Boat Building' started by origamiboats, Nov 30, 2001.

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  1. waterdrop
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Location: Vancouver BC

    waterdrop Junior Member

    there has been a ganley snowbird for sale in nova scotia for a little while now, don't know if it's been picked up but the pictures looked nice.
     
  2. Brent Swain
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Location: British Columbia

    Brent Swain Member

    The heriot bay Library has internet service as do the Cortes library at Mansons, Trudy's cafe where I am now, the Gorge harbour Marina, the heriot bay govt dock, Lasquetti Island internet service, Sechelt public access centre, Brentwood bay library, Sidney Library, Sechelt library, Campbell River library, Comox Library, Courtenay library, Duncan library, Union bay library, and available wireless internet all along the sunshine cost, and Deep bay, all of which I have used for these posts.I rarely spend more than two weeks in any one place.
    Internet is widely available all along the BC coast, and becoming increasingly more so..
    When the govt subsides a the average car in BC to the tune of $2500 a year,( I've never owned one) and subsidises the tar sands industry for destroying our environment irreparably, and subsidises such spreaders if childish faery tales as religion ,. I don't feel particular guilty for tapping in to a pension into which I contributed for 7 years, nor regaining the sales taxes I paid to subsidise the above my entire life.
    As ones environmental foot print EQUALS ones economic footprint, I don't feel particularly guilty about enjoying the benefits of my drastically reduced environmental foot print, when compared to treadmill living that you guys advocate as being "morally pure", either.

    I'd be happy to do the inclining test when ever I get to Silva Bay. As It's to cold for swimming down there, I'
    I won't be down there till late fall. To much good swimmin up here and far less private property.

    People have told me ' Brent, you have great life style" I said "That is because I run it myself. I don't let others run it. Anyone can live the same lifestyle. It's here for the taking.
    Don't envy, emulate"
     
  3. welder/fitter
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    welder/fitter Senior Member

    It would be a small sacrifice, as I can continue to follow the thread. I know that my posts have appeared to some to be a "relentless attack" and that they have stopped discussing the topic because it becomes more about personalities than the subject itself. Some of these members that I am referring to have much more to offer in this discussion than I, and I'd like to see them posting on the general subject of this method of constructing a boat. However, I have little "impulse control" when I read most of Brent's posts - not because of vindictiveness or envy, as Brent suggests - because his attacks and his bs make me angry. So, if it meant Brent wasn't manipulating the course of the thread, for me it would be win-win. Thanks for your support, Walter.

    Mike
     
  4. Brent Swain
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    Brent Swain Member

    Class rules are done with a total lack of imagination and innovativeness without giving a rats *** how much things cost , how much distortion they induce, nor how many cruising dreams they quash. They have total tunnel vision, and do everything they can to discourage progress and advancement in the building of metal boats.In other words , they have no class.

    Prefectionism has killed far to many cruising dreams.
     
  5. Brent Swain
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    Brent Swain Member

    While it's great to hear that Kasten has opened his mind a bit from his original postings on origami boat building, and that it is becoming increasingly common in Europe ( where I have sent a lot of books and plans) his comments that plate first is good , while origami has more severe limits on hull shapes, even tho they are essentially the same thing, is a total contradiction. Any hard chine hull can be built using origami methods, so it is no more limiting than any hard chine designing.
    His comments that it is not applicable for keels, rudders and skegs is total ********, unless I have been doing the "Impossible" for the last 30 years.
    (Brent Kreskin? Ya sure!)
    Origami keels, rudders and skegs have been quick and easy for me and all my clients for the last 30 years. It's the only logical way to put them together.
     
  6. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    No BS, it is decreasing since you and Anton Luft started beating your religious drums.
    And I doubt you sold many of your pamphlets here, Luft had a hard time to sell his crap already, but he was at least capable of calculating scantlings and formulae......

    And to your presumptuousness and arrogance about Kastens insight, he published most of these articles in the late 1990ies already.............
     
  7. Brent Swain
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    Brent Swain Member

    1. can easily be done in origami. One can pull a hull together using standard origami methods then cut out and fit in radiused pieces after. No problem. Multi chine has also been done. No problem.
    3 and 4 are also no problem, Frames can be put in afterward. A piece of half inch sch 40 pipe can be bent to make a good pattern. One can be used for many frames, one at a time. I use that for stem bars.

    Steel comes from asia in big rolls, which are flattened and sheered at whatever length the supplier wants. The biggest we have bought for boats is 40 feet. They were reluctant to sell us over 20 feet, until enough of mu clients bugged then for longer sheets. Then they began stocking 40 ft sheets, by 8 ft wide.
    The biggest sheet of steel I ever handled was 12 ft by 60 ft half inch plate
    They can cut it at whatever length they want. You just have to hound them a bit. Longer sheets are no skin of their asses.
    I have joined sheets amidships with no visible distortion. Just grind a 45 bevel all the way thru on the inside and tack several pieces of factory edge plate on edge across it every six inches. The 1/8th 7024 welds should be no longer than 6 inches each, allowing each to cool completely before putting one next to it. Keep an eye on it as they are cooling. . Then, after the hull is up ,I grind a thin gouge in the outside until there is no crack showing. Then a tiny uphand 1/8th inch 6011 weld , 2 inches at a time, so you have little to grind off to make it flush. This has resulted in an invisible weld with no filler of any kind needed.
    I have one such weld on my hull, which is invisible, with no filler of any kind.
     
  8. Brent Swain
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    Brent Swain Member

    It was the Snowbird which first got me interested in steel . Until then I was told that she had to be 1/8th hull plate. Ganley went for 3/16th onthr Snowbird, far tougher and more resistant to distortion. Ganly was a very practical designer who got his hands dirty building his own designs, so he understood how steel goes together in his own designs , unlike many designers who's only steel building experience is on paper. Ganley has good looking , extremely practical designs.
     
  9. MikeJohns
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    MikeJohns Senior Member



    There's no need for design to class to be either more expensive nor have any distortion. I've seen a handful of badly welded boats that you could refer to that were horribly dished but most steel boats with 5mm plate are immune from this when the weld schedule is adhered to. Note the weld schedule is part of the class rule too.

    You keep dishing these sorts of statements up but they are not supportable comments just biased opinions. How many photo's of beautifully fair steel boats without any filler does it take to understand that it's not only possible but more common than overwelded disasters.

    Just about every steel designer (you excepting) gives very detailed weld schedule and always strict advice on the welding. With a MIG welder and some welding know-how there's no excuse for distorted eyesores of hulls.

    Go look at M&M Ovendon's gallery and look at the job Murielles done. They didn't compromise strength for fairness and achieved both.
     
  10. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    I'm getting a little tired of Brent's conspiracy nonsense. One hallmark of a con man is that he tells you everyone in the world except him is lying to you, and out to screw you.

    Boatbuilding is as competitive as any other field. People don't get rich in it by inventing unnecessary standards of strength and craftsmanship, as an excuse for milking their clients.

    And by the way: I'd be ashamed to accept checks from a pension system, if I had only spent seven years contributing to it. That means Brent is sponging up money that honest, hardworking people paid in--and he's actually proud of the fact.

    Can we say 'parasite,' boys and girls? I knew you could....
     
  11. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    So live you aboard.. not hardly extensive cruising... but a great way of living for sure..
    I had my times of "vagabonding" as a salmonfisher and a gillie for a couple of decades and believe I know how people envy free lifestyle. Now I'm raising up my offsprings and got a steady job but when thats done I'm away. Anyway meanwhile I can build my boat without having a hurry to do it compromising the quality..
     
  12. TomThumb28
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    TomThumb28 Junior Member

    I bet at least one of those libraries has a scanner you can use, just sayin. :D
     
  13. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    :D :D :D :D so we see the lines drawing soon Brent???
     
  14. Northman
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    Northman Junior Member

    And maybe the stability curve of 170 + degrees too ...

    Walter
     

  15. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Here's some stability.. a lot of similarity both ways.. ;)
     

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