Origami steel yacht construction

Discussion in 'Metal Boat Building' started by origamiboats, Nov 30, 2001.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. TomThumb28
    Joined: Jul 2010
    Posts: 21
    Likes: 7, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 93
    Location: Canada

    TomThumb28 Junior Member

    Because you warped it over to starboard with a come-a-long like I said!

    ********! I can post more screenshots of slaggy edges on the aft centerline while you were pulling it together. Together, as in, not accessible for grinding. Unless you expect us to believe that you backgouged all those seams. Did you? I somehow doubt it

    More strawman arguments. I would've waited for dry weather, I would've drawn the coordinates properly. I would not have drawn the lines with a soapstone, I'd have used a metal marking pencil or maybe even a scribe, I don't know, I'd have to experiment a bit to figure out what works best. I think a scribe would work well if you used magnets to hold the batten in place (steel batten obviously). Then I would have cut the plates slightly oversized and carefully ground to the lines.

    I don't know, I'm not a designer but the point is that YOU don't even know much difference it would make! "roughly 1100 lbs per inch immersion" LMAO How do you know? I think lots of people here would like to check your work.

    It's still a rip off and I'm pretty sure I saw you post that youcharge $50 an hour. Did you change it?

    Post them then.
     
  2. MikeJohns
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 3,192
    Likes: 208, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 2054
    Location: Australia

    MikeJohns Senior Member

    Bent
    You really are deluded. Why do you make up rubbish like this? Do you really think it helps your cause to lie so desperately.

    All because you backed yourself into a corner with your excess hubris and couldn't admit that your book was wrong.

    Lift your game admit your errors and get on with it. You are just sinking into the miasma of lies distortions and hype with your responses here. You can do better . Grow up become a man, admit your errors and do a better job of your boat design. Then everyone is better off.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. LyndonJ
    Joined: May 2008
    Posts: 295
    Likes: 19, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 233
    Location: Australia

    LyndonJ Senior Member

    Brent has a set of lines now apparently from someone else. Damage control mode. Since he was caught out with pants down there too. :D

    Anyone who bought the 36 plans from him should be able to get them sent. But doubt they are accurate enough to cut a bulkhead template from.

    Lets see. Then if one of the customers sends one of us the lines we can post the real shape strength for the hull and compare it to a framed one . That will be more revealing than any amount of BS 'engineering'.

    Unless BS can convince the world that cold hard repeatable engineering is just a big fairytale, using Titanic, space shuttles and bumblebees to prove that only he is right.:rolleyes: :rolleyes:

    Nobody believes anything he says now, poor Alex must be squirming.:eek:
     
  4. welder/fitter
    Joined: Jun 2008
    Posts: 407
    Likes: 32, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 423
    Location: Vancouver

    welder/fitter Senior Member

    You know, The internet is a fickle mistress. Things we said in the past can often come back to bite us in the butt. As I have altered my opinion on various subjects over the years, and as there have been times when I have mis-spoken(usually due to not looking something up before making comment on it), I try to give other posters fair leeway, in this regard because we all make mistakes. Brent's quotes, however, are often regurgitations of regurgitations of some statement he has made, so, in such cases, he is consistent. Still, in other posts, he seems to have forgotten what he has said in the past on such topics. When he uses that "Liar!" comment, not accepting that the poster may have mis-spoken or stated something that he/she thought they read, rather than, did read, I just have to give that "Brent-boil" a squeeze.

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/metal-boat-building/welding-steel-hull-23055.html


    Post #21(page 2)
    Several have gone from rank beginners to getting welding tickets and have gone from poorly paid labourers to highly paid welders, after building their boats.
    Brent


    While I believe that welding is 90% practice, it does require 10% tutelage, from an experienced source, not, the blind leading the blind. Did several builders achieve this after being tutored by Brent? Not a chance!


    Post #44(page 3)
    ...I didn't do the welding on Alex's boat , his landlord did."


    I met the guy who owned the property that Alex built his boat on. His name was Jim, he was a retired welder, and while he was selling Paul L. his welding suitcase, I saw examples of his welding & know that he was an excellent welder. He was not responsible for that mess we've seen pictures of.


    "...Welders working on one of my boats said" Brent is a good fitter, but the only problem we have is he doesn't grind all the edges." I said" Do you know what they call a fitter who grinds everything? A slow fitter." "

    A good cut needs no grinding, unless you are trying to maximise the number of hours you are being paid for. Shipyard workers do that a lot. I aways keep my clients budget in mind.

    Now, Brent wants us to believe that he or Alex did grind all edges, though the video depicts otherwise & my oservations - going back to May/2007 - were that some edges were ground, many were not. I did try to be polite back then when broaching the topic, even lavished unwarranted praise on Brent for his "great workmanship" (a "little white lie"?)

    (My respones to these statements can be found on Post#87, on page 6)

    What is also confusing is that, when one notes that there is a plethora of posts by Brent on this, and other, forum(s) for almost every month of the year, for the past 9 years, one must wonder about posts such as:

    Post #273(page 19)
    "...My current origami boat is 25 years old, and has been cruising full time, 11 months a year, in both the North and South Pacific, and is in as good a shape as the day I built her.
    Brent"


    Did the boat go by itself? Or does cruising really mean living on board in Comox & taking the occasional sail, though not across the Pacific?

    Now, Brent has also suggested that he has only worked for one month per year, since in his early 20s. Still, I read a post that seems to contradict this:

    Post # 255(page 15)
    "Having worked many years as a brake press operator..."


    Often, the word used to mislead the reader is a simple "several", as in:

    Frameless steel hulls: Is there a lenght(sic) limit? (post #20)

    "...Several friends have 55 footers which have cruised the central Pacific and the Northern BC coast in all weathers, year round. None have transverse framing.
    Brent Swain."


    The only person on these forums whom I can honestly say I believe "Lies like a mountie", is Brent. Tsk, tsk.

    Mike
     
  5. TomThumb28
    Joined: Jul 2010
    Posts: 21
    Likes: 7, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 93
    Location: Canada

    TomThumb28 Junior Member

    I missed this line in Brent's response (learn to use quote tags for f#%@ sake! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BBCode)

    Then what was all that business in the video about making sure the hull plates match each other perfectly? To the point that nothing else matters, not even the plans! I think it's more likely the plates were the same length in which case it's perfectly obvious what happened. The port side half-hull was 5/8" farther ahead so the bow on that side was 5/8" higher. The only way to get the stem to match up was to pull the bow over to starboard since, as you have pointed out, it's impossible to compress 3/16" plate on edge. The only other option would have been to recut the sheer which means you would have had to cut off the bulwark pipe and we all know that didn't happen. If you actually measured the plates you could true them up and then any mismatch at the stern would indicate for certain the alignment was off while it's easy to fix. Why not?
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2010
  6. Wynand N
    Joined: Oct 2004
    Posts: 1,260
    Likes: 148, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1806
    Location: South Africa

    Wynand N Retired Steelboatbuilder

    Thanks for pointing that thread WF.

    To give some new guys reading these posts insight about BS, and why we are tired of his ranting I quote this reply from me #46 page 4 from http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/metal-boat-building/welding-steel-hull-23055.html dated 08/6/20087

    And still after years he is back with his same old tricks.

    And seems BS you missed this from an earlier post and let me repeat it again.
    Winners knows when to stop....
    BS, just go away quietly and safe some face if you still have any left. With this tread you are on a suicide mission and many people - in excess of 74500 people viewed this tread already - will by now know the real BS of your silly explanations about boat design and will take their business elsewhere.
    Actually, since yesterday the views raised to over 75000 and still counting....
     
  7. murdomack
    Joined: Jun 2007
    Posts: 309
    Likes: 23, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 282
    Location: Glasgow

    murdomack New Member

  8. magwas
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 287
    Likes: 8, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: Hungary

    magwas Senior Member

    you see? dents on the hull :)
     
  9. junk2lee
    Joined: Jul 2010
    Posts: 76
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 18
    Location: Canada

    junk2lee Junior Member


    From my certain knowledge,you are wrong.Brent has made lots of long trips and I've been aboard these larger boats.I've known Brent over 25 years and he's never lied to me nor has any common aquaintance said so either.He is dedicated to steel boats and all the boats I know of are tough and good boats.

    In fact he has lived aboard his own boats the entire time I've known him and his boat,is better now than when he built her.I venture that all good yachts share this,as their owners add and improve.
    If Brent's ideas are informed by his experience,that's to the good,is it not?

    The personal insinuations on this forum are out of hand -no wonder Brent lashes back.

    He's not the only builder/designer I've known.As an aside,some of these could build a beautiful boat by eye with not much more than just a batten and a pencil as design tools and some of these boats had their lines taken off AFTER being built because others wanted one.I am not suprised that an experienced craftsman can do this but as to sitting them down to a drafting table and forcing them to conform to a set of scantlings or shear calculations-well,I can just hear em !...Or as a broad example,how about Viking ships,( among so many others) come to mind as analyses after-the-fact.

    Granted!- technical stuff is absolutely pertinent to this forum!but a little empirical analysis and comment doesn't hurt either.I've done this a bit myself...trying to deconstruct a formula.Sometimes,they just come down to Common Experience times BS squared...I can't believe that the perfect sailboat or even a bulk carrier is reduced to a formula however hard people try.
     
  10. peter radclyffe
    Joined: Mar 2009
    Posts: 1,419
    Likes: 64, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 680
    Location: europe

    peter radclyffe Senior Member

  11. peter radclyffe
    Joined: Mar 2009
    Posts: 1,419
    Likes: 64, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 680
    Location: europe

    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    quote
    junk 2 lee

    and his boat,is better now than when he built her,


    how is this possible ?
     
  12. peter radclyffe
    Joined: Mar 2009
    Posts: 1,419
    Likes: 64, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 680
    Location: europe

    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    quote

    He's not the only builder/designer I've known.As an aside,some of these could build a beautiful boat by eye with not much more than just a batten and a pencil

    no plumb bob, level, string lines, tape measures, rules, lasers, cramps, blocks, welding dogs, wedges, bevel gauge, square, engineering chalk, declivity blocks, cables, shores, bottlescrews,
     
  13. Brent Swain
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 951
    Likes: 35, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: -12
    Location: British Columbia

    Brent Swain Member

    Youd take years to do a couple of weeks work
     
  14. Brent Swain
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 951
    Likes: 35, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: -12
    Location: British Columbia

    Brent Swain Member

    More strawman arguments. I would've waited for dry weather,

    Wait for dry weatther ? In BC . It woukld take years to build a boat, like the framers do.

    I don't know,

    The most honest thing you have said so far

    I'd have cut the plates slightly oversized and carefully ground to the lines.
    Slower than a government bureaucrat. Would add months to a boats construction. Do it your way and then give us a record of the time it takes.
     

  15. junk2lee
    Joined: Jul 2010
    Posts: 76
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 18
    Location: Canada

    junk2lee Junior Member

    JM fliiiesby.jpg

    here's two.
     

    Attached Files:

Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.