Orbital Sander Advice

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by nero, Jul 16, 2005.

  1. nero
    Joined: Aug 2003
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    Location: Marseille, France / Illinois, US

    nero Senior Member

    When sanding epoxy, what is the best sander type to use?

    I have a Metabo/Ridgid 6 inch variable speed sander. It works well.

    Would a 7 inch air powered sander cut faster or use less sandpaper? It is lighter in weight.

    What are the pro's using?

    Thanks
     
  2. zember311
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: FL

    zember311 Junior Member

    I use air powered at the marina. 6 inch ,3 inch and a 4 inch jitter bug, but funny enough my friend is a rep for Metabo tools and I was able to mess around with them.

    I.M.H.O it's all the same.

    your not going to save that much more paper by going from the 6 to the 7.
     
  3. nero
    Joined: Aug 2003
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    Location: Marseille, France / Illinois, US

    nero Senior Member

    I dug out my father old jitterbug today. It vibrates less than my random orbital and works better for sanding edges. Gets cold in the hand and has a bit of condensation after several minutes of use.

    My best solution is to get better at glassing.

    thanks for the advice
     
  4. zember311
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: FL

    zember311 Junior Member

    One ( old head ) as he liked to be called told me something many moons ago.

    He said ,

    " do you know what the difference between a beginner and a professional is? "

    Seeing how I did not have the answer, I stated the simple reply , " No",

    " professionals are nothing more then the beginners, only they have already made the same mistakes and have learned how not to make them again "

    He was a cool cat,

    Still with your mention above, the coldness in the palms is a god sent durning the summer months. lol

    they will have to pry my cold lifeless fingers from my jitterbug, they work so well with wet sanding also, just keep it oiled inside and out and you can knock your wet sanding down oh so much.

    Enjoy~
     
  5. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Iowa

    lewisboats Obsessed Member


  6. nero
    Joined: Aug 2003
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    Location: Marseille, France / Illinois, US

    nero Senior Member

    Interesting, the thought of using plexiglass and and clamps passed thru my mind also.

    On seams, where 2 layers of bi-axel overlap, I am using peel ply and a scrap piece of plywood with 2 or three cement blocks on top. This flattens out the joint. The result is not as perfect as the plexiglass solution.

    For the large bulkhead area, I have been wetting out the fabric and pulling excess resin with a piece of weather stripping. Then as soon as the resin gets thick, I pour on one more glass of resin and skim/screet (flow coat). The result needs sanding but not a lot.

    Thanks
     
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