Optimal headsail track placement.

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Eliseviv, Aug 15, 2012.

  1. Eliseviv
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    Eliseviv Junior Member

    Hi Peeps,

    I'm about to move a few blocks cleats etc on the deck of my 37' Shockwave, and the existing tracks are too far out, largely to accomodate some previous hardware that was on the deck. Im planning on putting some new tracks inboard of the existing ones, for close hauled sailing and was wondeing if there is some optimal calcualtion for track distance from the centre line. I have used a "barber hauler" (spelling?) to mimick the effect, and got much higher with this setup. The existing tracks are about 1.6 metres from the centre line now.

    Cheers

    Brett
     
  2. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Corley epoxy coated

    I really like how the guys arrange their headsail sheeting on the MOD70's sail, tracks which are fixed have limited adjustment a system like they use with a series of floating blocks will give much better sail adjustment. I put up a thread on the forum a while back about it, you could organise a similar arrangement on your boat also lets you run a variety of headsails and always be able to adjust the clew position accurately. As another bonus it spreads the loads out over more points.

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/attachments/multihulls/72213d1341874184-how-sheeting-arranged-gennaker-mod70-mod70-sheets-headsail.jpg
     
  3. catsketcher
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    catsketcher Senior Member

    Gday Brett

    12 degrees comes to mind. I would put another set of tracks further out as well for the reacher.

    I would glass tubes on and shove some stainless rod inside it for the tracks. Like Corley I like the ORMA set up. It works well but may not be so good above a deck where it could drop down and give it a couple of clouts every tack.

    There is no magic angle - in some monos we used to ease the leads out due to increased windspeed or chop and tighten it in again in flat water and 10 knots. The Tasar has tracks mounted sideways and we play with them all the time.

    cheers

    Phil
     
  4. redreuben
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    redreuben redreuben

    I sort of get it from the picture, any chance of a diagram ?
     
  5. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    When we went to a furler we used the track layout in Rob James book as a guide and it turned out right.With the forward end of the track even with the mast the angle to the headstay is 9 degrees. The aft end of the track ,long enough for a big genoa, is at a angle of 7 1/2 degrees to the headstay. This lets your sail get a tight sheeting angle unfurled but moves it out a little as it is rolled up for heavy weather when the slot needs to be widened. Your spreaders and stays need to be able to allow the angle though so check from boat to boat. We use tackle to move the genoa car as we furl, it make sail area changes fast and tuning for wind strength efficient. A outboard barberhauler mounted midway along the track line works great for widening the sheeting base without another track.
     
  6. Eliseviv
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    Eliseviv Junior Member

    Thanks for the Ideas. Out to have a bit of a look atthe boat today and will see if the ORMA setup will work.

    Cheers

    Brett
     
  7. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    I tried drawing a diagram and it ended up looking like a pack of spaghetti but there is this other picture and when you look at both it gives you a good idea how it is configured.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Eliseviv
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    Eliseviv Junior Member

    The MOD70 setup adds a whole new dimension to the sail setting opportunities (aka stuff ups ;-))
     
  9. Silver Raven
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    Silver Raven Senior Member

    Gooday Brett. "MOD 70 = (aka stuff ups) - "tain't necessarily so" - different colors for - in/out - - forward/aft - - would surely help.

    Whilst I agree with you - it might be a tad complicated - - it doesn't have to be 'all-that' over the top - - HOWEVER - I can assure you it sure does give 300% better control of the 'percise' trimming (aka - sweet-stop) of the head sails (all of them) - linked-to or passing through the same sheave.

    Biggest problem - I can see - is - getting someones 'head-around' the big picture understanding of the solution of/for the problem.

    The 'floating-sheeting' - sweet-spot - is just a big movable X - with all corners movable - that's really - K I S S when you lay-it-all-out. I M H O

    A bit like - getting the 'motor' in the 'sweet-spot' - - put it forward - & use a "long-tail" shaft to get the prop where it needs to be. Just - 'think - out-side the square'. Lots of blokes - in the 'mosquito-yard' & in town - that can do that.

    Keep well - keep smiling - go sailing & get that 'beaut-toy' sailing faster. Ciao, james
     
  10. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    I've always been more annoyed by a lack of adjustments than having more than I need. Barberhaulers help but there is times when they are a clumsy way of controlling headsail shape and more adjustment would be handy. It's interesting we have a pretty good range of controls for the mainsail we can adjust mast rotation, cunningham and outhaul the traveller the sheet we can control twist etc but headsails have a bit of a rudimentary sheet on the clew, some crude tracks and if your lucky a barberhauler.

    It's an area a lot of club boats could look at to make themselves quite a bit more competitive. Thats what strikes me when racing if you have excellent sailors onboard they are always making adjustments to the sail controls and looking to extract the most out of the boat while the crews on the other boats are just sitting around and complaining about their handicap and that x boat is half a knot faster. The experts are frustrated by the lack of sail control and the amateurs are annoyed that they have to pack up lines "that they dont use anyway". I've always learnt ten times as much on an actively managed boat as a lazy one and the extra work is worth it. The best skippers inspire with their ability to think inside and outside the boat and have a high level of situational awareness eg, wheres the next shift and whats the tide doing, will we lay that next mark with the tide ebbing etc.

    Anyway getting a bit OT there.
     
  11. Eliseviv
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    Eliseviv Junior Member

    Hi Corley,

    Nah your not OT. My "aka stuff ups" was tongue in cheek. I'm actually looking forward to jury rigging some lines up to test this out!
     
  12. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    I like the setup, its just a bit over the top for cruising. The way to look at all the spagetti is either something to get the guests tangled in or extra line to hold on to. It would be a great way to figure out where you really want your track or sheetleads for the less is more crowd. When I can source track used buying all that line starts to look less fun....makes great sense for a non wingdeck cat or tri though.
     
  13. Silver Raven
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    Silver Raven Senior Member

    Gooday 'Cav-2' - Makes a lot of 'cents' - if before bolting the track down in the wrong position you can figure out just exactly where it should be & then just put the -"strings & things" & blocks - back in the bag - for the next time you want to set up another front-sail.

    Even when cruising - if you don't want to make the effort to 'tune-that-sail' - even very lay-back cruising - you can go cruise on another boat or go down & mix some 'sundowners' - that's the way I call it on my 'toy'.

    It's still just an adjustable floating string cross & as such is not complicated at all. I M H O - ciao, james
     
  14. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Cheers James, maybe clubs can pool their old blocks and sheets into a set up bag. Of course racing sets the fashion so track should be even cheaper soon !
     

  15. oceansailor
    Joined: Aug 2012
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    oceansailor Junior Member

    I really like this set up, there must be pre planned points too rig to, to set this up, its difficult to follow all the control lines, Gitana 11 is one of my favorite designs in her present configuration.

    Keith
     
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