opinions please

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by 8knots, Feb 14, 2002.

  1. 8knots
    Joined: Feb 2002
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    Location: Wasilla Alaska

    8knots A little on the slow side

    Here are few of my doodles. they are in no way really ready to show to anybody yet but your opinions will guide me further in the design process. thanks for your time.
     

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  2. 8knots
    Joined: Feb 2002
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    Location: Wasilla Alaska

    8knots A little on the slow side

    one more!
     

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  3. Peter H
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    Peter H Junior Member

    how does it move?

    I dont see any prop on it but it was really nice
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest

    :)

    I agree that they're both really nicely drawn.
     
  5. christos
    Joined: Jan 2002
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    Location: Athens

    christos Junior Member

    RE designs posted

    beautiful hulls

    are you using any specific cad software for producing hull lines?

    Do you recommend any?
     
  6. 8knots
    Joined: Feb 2002
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    8knots A little on the slow side

    thanks

    the lines i posted are just sketches at this time, or works in progress if you will. the second of the boats has no prop because i was toying with that superstructure on a semi-disp hull. note the twin 3406e cats in the plan view. but when in prifile she is set up as a full disp with a single screw. for now i sketch all my lines out on paper then scan them into corel draw 10 and overlay the pencil with vectors so i can plot them out to scale at work. i am a graphic designer in the sign industry. as far as marine software is concerned i have played with vacanti and maxsurf both have i think a fast learning curve allso there is a italian program called defcar it and all the modules that compliment it are really amazing. but unless you work for azimut or another big company it is probably to costly to consider. thanks a million for the comments.
     
  7. Peter H
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    Peter H Junior Member

    This is my second small boat

    This is a boat that i designed last year
     

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  8. Polarity
    Joined: Dec 2001
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    Location: UK

    Polarity Senior Member

    Like it..

    Hi 8knots

    Really like your first post - I'm not a designer - (and there are many on this board who are who I'm sure will be joining in this one soon..)- but she does look good. The only thing I would say is that the mast seems to me to be slightly too large relative to the vessel - otherwise very nice.
    This kind of "expedition yacht" is all the rage now in the superyacht world. http://www.vripack.com/40_years_anniversary_bulletin_2.htm for example.

    Further design discussions here Check out Steves bit on converging lines / \ :)

    Lots of discussions under Software on inexpensive software for people like you and me that just like to mess around rather than work for Feadship...

    Would be interested to see some more! - do you do sailing yachts?

    Cheers

    Paul
     
  9. 8knots
    Joined: Feb 2002
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    Location: Wasilla Alaska

    8knots A little on the slow side

    thanks to peter and paul
    i was getting concerned with little reply to my lines. bad or good are all welcome. thanks for the tip on converging lines. point well taken. i have a lot of difficulty drawing ANYTHING that is not symetrical it is a habit i am trying to curb. paralell lines to are a problem allso. as far as sailboats are concerned, no not yet when i decide what school to attend i am sure to get a share of drawing and designing them. allthough i love old sailing ships
    any movie with good old sailing scenes are in my collection(captains couragious, mutiny on the bounty and the like. i grew up on the east coast. have you ever seen the lines or pics of the racing log canoe's? not a canoe as you think, but hewn of 6-8 big logs ang carry a gob of sail! very impressive to see on the water in a race. the boats of the chesapeake bay are in a class all there own. check out this link if you have some time.http://www.logcanoes.com
    thanks again 8 kts
     
  10. Stephen Ditmore
    Joined: Jun 2001
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    Stephen Ditmore Senior Member

    I give you an enthusiastic thumbs up, 8knots.

    The first reminds me of Devlin's designs:
    Devlin Designing Boat Builders – Artfully Designed and Crafted Boats since 1978 http://www.devlinboat.com/

    I'd recommend drawing an inboard profile. It doesn't need to be as detailed as the final one I did at
    http://www.kadeykrogen.com/krogen39profilearrangement.htm
    but a preliminary inbd profile can be very useful in planning the interior. Also, it's important that the steering position be high enough relative to the bow for good visibility, and ABYC
    H-24 2005 - American Boat and Yacht Council http://www.abycinc.org/
    has a standard for that.

    Do you subscribe to Passagemaker magazine?

    See also the links at
    Design Question https://www.boatdesign.net/threads/design-question.267/
     
  11. Stephen Ditmore
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    Stephen Ditmore Senior Member

    You know what would be really interesting....

    I think Nils Lucander, author of
    http://www.naval-architects.org/page/newsart3
    has passed away, but I'd like to see someone with a strong interest in trawler yachts pick up his work where he left off. The wave cancellation principle of his tri-keelers is the same that John Klimek's been working on at
    http://boatdesign.net/forums/showthread.php?threadid=243&pagenumber=2
    using Michlet
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/showthread.php?threadid=280

    If so inclined, you could recearch Lucander's work a little, then compare notes with Klimek...
     
  12. 8knots
    Joined: Feb 2002
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    Location: Wasilla Alaska

    8knots A little on the slow side

    Thanks

    Stephen
    Thank you for your kind words of encouragement! I love your Krogen, she is quite a piece of work. Did you work on the design team of the new Krogen 58 featured in this month’s issue of Passagemaker? No I do not subscribe to any one magazine. I tend to spread my reading tastes around between Wooden Boat, Passagemaker and whatever “buyers guide” catches my eye. I just picked up an issue of showboats international in an attempt to begin my training in modern design. As of yet I have not quite got the eye for it. As for the Tri-Keel theory, I am already a believer. I will post a tug style yacht that I am brainstorming on now. Please note the crude Tri-Keel arrangement. Unfortunately I do not yet understand wave and friction drag enough to comment on them much. She has the twin keels for my home waters of Alaska. We have average tides of 22-30 feet. A design that can stand alone on her keels would serve her owners well when digging clams or doing other things ashore. And tugs need to be twin-screw boats with BIG engine rooms! But that is just an opinion of mine. Yes I like Kasten’s work a lot. The little 34 footer you like is loosely based on a 27’ William Garden design published in Wooden Boat many years ago. What is your opinion of slow little trawlers? In little family boats it seems people are looking for that Nordic Tug semi-disp14 knot boat. Could a guy survive designing slow family boats anymore? Ed monk’s trawlers will never be out of style. People will build from those molds for years to come. Thanks for the links! I will keep the questions flying. Thanks for all your time 8Kts
     

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  13. Stephen Ditmore
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    Stephen Ditmore Senior Member

    I worked on the Krogen Express 49 and the various versions of the 48 trawler yacht, but the 39 is the one that I contributed most to. James S. Krogen died of a sudden heart attack while jogging just after doing the preliminary design. While I was working on the 39 Jim Krogen's elder son, James Morrow (Jimmy) Krogen, did the preliminary design that became the 58. I left the company and moved to the New York area before having a chance to do much work on the 58. In fact, James S. Krogen & Co. Inc. as such no longer exists, but the people who used to work there are either on their own or work for Kadey-Krogen Yachts, and most of my former colleages did work on the 58, which I like a lot.

    I think programs like Michlet, Shipflow, and Splash may offer an opportunity to refine tri-keelers to a degree beyond what Lucander was able to do in his lifetime (he was not a big fan of theoretical aero/hydrodynamics himself), and I think John Klimek's postings to this forum (see link in my previous posting) illustrate the approach very nicely (though his boat's a trimaran, the approach is applicable to a tri-keeler).

    Good luck! Keep posting as your career progresses!
     

  14. 8knots
    Joined: Feb 2002
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    Location: Wasilla Alaska

    8knots A little on the slow side

    the basic body plan

    Here is the basic body plan for the small trawler I posted before. I have stretched the hull to 40’ LOA. She was a little tubby I think with a 12’2” BEAM. With a draft of 4’5” I went to the library in my very small town and was surprised to find VOYAGING UNDER POWER by ROBERT BEEBE, UNDERSTANDING BOAT DESIGN by TED BREWER, and SKENE’S ELEMENTS OF YACHT DESIGN the 8th edition revised by FRANCIS KINNY. All of the Bibles of basic design so I am told. Now comes the not so fun part of sifting through the math and different designer’s opinions. I will post more soon! I am working on the waterlines and an inboard profile/arrangement plan. 8Kts
     

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