opinion of Beta Marine diesels

Discussion in 'Diesel Engines' started by BelleCanto, Oct 5, 2013.

  1. BelleCanto
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    BelleCanto Junior Member

    Anyone know anything about the quality of these engines? I am looking for a new 15-25 hp engine for a boat I'm planning on building.
     
  2. FAST FRED
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Beta builds nothing , they simply add marinize someones engine.

    Usually Kabota , but others do as well.

    Learn what makes a good heat exchanger , and decide on the most trouble free transmission and then decide who you want to bolt it all on to some engine.

    I like Kubota as they can be found on truck reefers and in many lawn tractors , so the right engine need not purchase marine $tupid pri$ed part$.
     
  3. BelleCanto
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    BelleCanto Junior Member

    Thanks Fast Fred. I work in the landscape industry, and Kubota has a major share of the market, and I think they are a great product. I don't anything at all about heat exchangers or wet exhausts, and I would prefer someone to tell me, yes this is good or no this is bad.
    I know exactly what you mean by the criminal prices people charge for products because it has the word marine in front of it. They should be prosecuted.
    Can you recommend a setup re: heat exchangers etc? Thanks
     
  4. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    I see very many Beta diesels in small fishing boats.

    I guess they are reliable.

    As fred stated the cooling system is always the weak point of a marine engine

    Inquire specifically about the beta diesels cooling system and exhaust
     
  5. BelleCanto
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    BelleCanto Junior Member

    Thank you Michael. I will have to educate myself about this...I'm a long way away from building anything so I have lots of time.
     
  6. FAST FRED
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    I have used products from this company for decades , but there are other good builders.

    Even Sendure has 2 grades of material for the exchangers.


    SEN-DURE, INC. | Manufacturers of Heat Exchangers and Oil Coolers
    www.sen-dure.com/‎

    If you chose one of the Hirth transmissions use at least 1 larger size than their guide would recommend .

    2 Questions , why diesel? and if water cooled , why not a radiator and air vent or dry stack and keel cooled .?
     
  7. Easy Rider
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    Easy Rider Senior Member

    FF says;

    "If you chose one of the Hirth transmissions use at least 1 larger size than their guide would recommend."

    Sounds like you're talk'in ankers on TF.

    But I agree on the Hirth.
     
  8. BelleCanto
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    BelleCanto Junior Member

    I was thinking diesel because of the lesser chance of vapour ignition issues, and usually the fuel economy is a little better......at least it is in trucks, not sure about boats. I wasn't aware that an air cooled radiator was an option for a marine application. I'm assuming the air vent you refer to is funnelling exterior air to the radiator? Dry stack I assume is just a direct vertically vented exhaust....what about noise from this? How far can you route the exhaust pipe before its a problem? I googled keel cooler and get the concept.... makes sense....is radiator cooling better than a keel cooling setup? I'm thinking it would certainly be more convenient. Thanks
     
  9. FAST FRED
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    At low speeds a simple (cheap) piece of galv pipe is a fine heat exchanger .

    Many books will tell you how long it must be for your engine.

    A dry stack exhaust has a MUFFLER (sometimes two) and is as loud as your car.


    The virtue of using Dry stack and keel cooling is there is NO marinization to the engine , (although a transmission is required) so an engine can come from any source can be installed.

    The Kubota are found in many over the road truck reefers , so used nice running take outs can be had for $300 or so.
     
  10. BelleCanto
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    BelleCanto Junior Member

    Thank you, FF.
     
  11. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    The disadvantage of dry stack is heat in the machine room. If its an open lobster boat then no worries.

    If its a cruiser and you plan to live next to the engine room...think again.
     
  12. BelleCanto
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    BelleCanto Junior Member

    A fly in the ointment....a cruiser it is. I guess if I go with a dry stack the ideal situation would be to have the stack and muffler insulated and enclosed on the exterior of the cockpit wall...don't know if that's a typical situation or not. How complicated/unreliable is a wet exhaust?
     
  13. FAST FRED
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    muffler insulated and enclosed on the exterior of the cockpit wall..

    Right , installing it inside the double wall stack material as used for fireplaces works fine.

    Some wrapped insulation on the exhaust manifold and pipe in the engine room means the ER can be ventilated with normal equipment.

    Fan$y venting is easy , but many will find a powered radiator fan from any modern car fine.

    A wet exhaust requires a second pump, usually with an impeller that needs servicing , a heat exchanger with zincs and an exhaust loop and long pipe or hose to lead to the transom.

    Some will add a muffler .

    Hassle is all this must be maintained and worse winterized on each return to the dock in freezing weather. Make a bo bo winterizing and the boat can sink.
     
  14. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Gee, i have 16,000 hrs on my cummins wet exhaust and 14,000 hrs on my mtu wet exhaust. They get diassembled clean and inspected every 2000 hrs.

    The circulation pumps are serviced at 1000 and 3 thousand hrs

    Its reliable. Flushing your system of seawater for downtime helps. Standing seawater is your enemy.

    Dry stack works. Millions of fisherman cant be wrong. Removing heat from the machine space is the issue. It can be done.
     

  15. bertho
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    bertho bertho

    guys,
    have a quick look at "asap marine" or equivalent on google.., they have all to properly marinize any kubota base, including nice exhaust manifold/combined with heat exchanger, raw water pump.. and so,,, Kubota are very good base for small marine engine. ZF/ hurth gearbox ( select heavy duty model to do light duty safely...) with proper damper coupling..paint in all in white and done !!...
    best rgds
    bertho
    www.fusionschooner.blogspot.com
     
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