Ontong Java II by Hans Klaar

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by JCaprani, May 3, 2012.

  1. JCaprani
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    JCaprani Junior Member

  2. Manfred.pech
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    Manfred.pech Senior Member

  3. Alex.A
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    Alex.A Senior Member

    Inspiration. Keep us updated on how the build is going.
    Any idea what the cost will be once complete?
     
  4. JCaprani
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    JCaprani Junior Member

    Hi Alex,

    Will put up more photos as we progress, keels were laid down 5 weeks ago and hulls now almost complete, ready to install bulkheads and start the fit out in next few days.

    Cost is the same as any big boat - every Euro the owner can muster.

    All the best,

    John

    https://picasaweb.google.com/110932966887426577721

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    Last edited: May 7, 2012
  5. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    John, if you have the time I'd be interested in a description of the boat and building technique.

    Is this a traditional design (from where) or a Hans Klarr design?

    Are the hulls black because of paint, or were they charred? Is this the antifouling? What type of wood are the planks? Some of the planks appear to be sawn, others shaped with an adze.

    What are the wood blocks on the outside of the hulls, underneath the thwarts?

    Is that a fabric that is sealing the edges and cracks of the hull planks? What is it made of, and how is it sealed?

    What type of sail rig?
     
  6. mydauphin
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    Cool boats
     
  7. JCaprani
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    JCaprani Junior Member

    This is a boat built to Hans' own drawings and specifications, inspired by historical lines drawings of traditional Polynesian sailing craft.

    The hulls are painted black. The wood is a local mahogany type reddish hardwood. Planks have been worked with both saws and adzes.

    Those are the lashing pads for tying down the crossbeams which join the hulls.

    This is the local caulking method and is a trade secret, sorry I can't say more.

    I will put up pictures of the rig when she is ready to sail.

    Thanks and all the best,

    John
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. Alex.A
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    Alex.A Senior Member

    Love those hulls. Can't believe that only rubber strips are used to caulk tho'.... is epoxy used anywhere on the hulls?
    Would love more info from Hans on the different length hulls - esp as they are the same width - on how they perform and how it affects the wave between hulls while underway.
    Presume the rig will again be a tacking crab claw?
     
  9. JCaprani
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    JCaprani Junior Member

    Hi Alex,

    Epoxy is used only to fix the decks down to prevent leaks (they will be screwed too). Otherwise it's all wood, paint, bolts and nails.

    The starboard hull is quite a bit wider but not easily visible from the photos. The port hull has a finer entry.

    Rig has still not been completely finalised, we are still sourcing masts and spars but it will be similar to the first ontong java. More on that later.

    New photos posted at picasaweb.google.com/110932966887426577721/OntongJavaIIWestAfrica2012

    All the best,

    John
     
  10. masalai
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    masalai masalai

  11. JCaprani
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    JCaprani Junior Member

  12. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    How does Hans plan to use such a large vessel (relatively speaking)? How many crew will be required?
     
  13. Alex.A
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    Alex.A Senior Member

    Hi - just seen "plans" on the other site - is the mast going to be off-set? Whats the reasoning behind this?
     
  14. peterchech
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    peterchech Senior Member

    I was under the impression that Hans used his catamarans to ship goods to remote parts of the world, essentially he is an old school merchant. I'm not sure how building a traditional catamaran helps him at all, esp since his last cat was built extra large specifically so he would have more cargo space. According to his interview with Webb Chiles at least...
     

  15. Alex.A
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    Alex.A Senior Member

    Link to interview?
    "plans" say sleeps 20 - moving into charter biz?
    Building this way is cool - and apart from the original Ontong Java, is there anything like it? "Anaa" the new name?
    Should go into show-biz - something like 'tall ship chronicles' - a circumnavigation with a funky cat like this?
     
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