one boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Peter H, Dec 19, 2001.

  1. Peter H
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    Peter H Junior Member

    One of my boats
     

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  2. Stephen Ditmore
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    Stephen Ditmore Senior Member

    As far as marketing yourself goes I doubt I can be of much help, but is there some aspect of megayacht design you'd like to discuss? What makes one megayacht better than another, in your opinion?
     
  3. Stephen Ditmore
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    Stephen Ditmore Senior Member

    I'm going to suggest eliminating the fashion plates. They interfere with the view from the windows (ports) and with line handling. The overhanging decks can be made strong enough without them. I advocated this in the course of finalizing the Krogen 39 trawler yacht, and the omission was noticed and praised in a design review by the editor of Passagemaker magazine. I also like a split-level design with an atrium in the middle. It's easy for the decks to become too seperate, and it can become difficult to locate the person you want to speak with. These day's you'd end up calling them on their cell phone if they were on a different deck!
     
  4. Peter H
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    Peter H Junior Member

    Thanks!!!

    Thank you for the sugestions, i will get back with a new picture of the ship
     
  5. Peter H
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    Peter H Junior Member

    Another boat

    I have another boats with more windows hope you like it
     

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  6. Stephen Ditmore
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    Stephen Ditmore Senior Member

    Though rules are meant to be broken in cases, I think there's utility to being able to walk along a side deck, line to the dock in hand, from bow to stern, though I think it's O.K. to have to climb or decend some steps in the process as long as they're not too steep. This need not necessarily be possible on both sides, but I think it should be possible on one. Also. the freeboard of your yacht looks low to me for an ocean-going vessel, and while I'm not against long, the length looks out of proportion to me for a 3 decker.

    The good news is that you're clearly a prolific, and I suspect fast, CAD draftsman, and this could get you a job with a yacht design or naval architecture office if you play your cards right.

    Merry Christmas
    Stephen
     
  7. Stephen Ditmore
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    Stephen Ditmore Senior Member

  8. Peter H
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    Peter H Junior Member

    Here is another boat

    Hello!!
    I dont just draw big boats like the ones ontop
    this one is pretty nice except the window in the front
     

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  9. Jeff
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    Jeff Moderator

    For whatever it's worth, I tend to like the top and bottom designs, but the one in the middle I'm not sold on. Aesthetically speaking, I like simplicity and most importantly consistently. The problem I have with the design in the middle is that the bow with its curved areas doesn't seem to share much in common with the stern. I also sometimes like the juxtaposition of angled against straight ( |\ or /| ) but I find the / \ a little troubling as it tends to overpower the strength of the overall hull lines as well as the feeling of motion – it might be because the hull is pretty low for this length that this bothers me. Of course these are just my own opinions, but you did ask for feedback ;)
     
  10. Peter H
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    Peter H Junior Member

    Good said Jeff

    I also think that the one in the middle is a little bit special but now i have come up with a real killer design
     

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  11. Stephen Ditmore
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    Stephen Ditmore Senior Member

    Interesting, Jeff; I think I agree except / \ can work if all lines converge on a couple of points above the boat rather than being parallel. That way they pull the boat together instead of fighting each other.
     

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  12. Jeff
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    Jeff Moderator

    You're right - I spoke too soon.

    In your example I really like the fact that the two points give order to the lines. I think part of the genius of a good designer is to make things seemingly simply, so that everything lines up in one or more ways to form an overall design. I like discovering that there is an order behind the individual elements.

    I also like that there are two points of convergence better than if there were one as it makes it feel as if everything is in balance but at the same time there is a tension there... a feeling that the distance between the points is appropriate for a design in motion. Logically I would think that I would not find fault with a series, but it seems to break down in practice. Also the aggressive bow in the second example above might be why I find fault with the converging angles in the middle design - it might be partially a consistency issue.

    In school I remember many times bringing in an (architectural) model and the professor would literally tear off anything which was added on as an extra, as just "style", if it could not be justified by the overall concept or geometry. The idea was that perfection is achieved when nothing can be added and nothing can be taken away.
     
  13. Peter H
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    Peter H Junior Member

    intresting

    Hello again
    with a little more practice it might be better boats, im planning do study design next year and hopefully that would help me dra better ships
    /Peter
     
  14. Jeff
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    Jeff Moderator

    Good - I think you will enjoy it immensely. I’m curious - how long have you been drawing boats & ships? Are you working mostly with just profiles to come up with new designs, or do you also work with plans? Have you done any 3d drawings or quick 3d vignettes? Don’t get me wrong – 2d drawings are a fast and efficient way to create and work new designs, but if you’re working with cuts and other complicated shapes and multiple layers, a 3d sketch might allow you to explore it further.

    P.S. Don’t take any criticism above too seriously; just decide yourself if it fits in the “wow, I didn’t see it that way before” or the “it’s strange that someone else looks at it that way, but it’s always good to have another perspective” category and then file or use it accordingly.
     

  15. Stephen Ditmore
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    Stephen Ditmore Senior Member

    I like your last one the best, Peter. It looks rather patrol boat like. Some people might not like that in a yacht, but I do. I think it's the most proportionate of the three, and it succeeds in conveying the energy and excitement that you seem to be after.

    I would remind people reading this that the preliminary cartooning of an outboard profile is important, but ultimately a very small part of a complete yacht design. A thouroughly thought out custom yacht will have about L^2/4 man-hours of design/engineering time in it by the time sea trials are complete (L in feet). That means a 155 footer will require about 6000 hours or about 3 man-years of design and engineering, whether that's done by an independent naval architect, structural engineer or composite specialist, stylist or interior designer, the builder, suppliers, or some combination thereof. Also, the design will probably have to comply with classification society guidelines (ABS, Lloyds, DNV or similar), and perhaps U.S. Coast Guard and British MCA <http://www.mcagency.org.uk/index.htm> standards, certain IMO standards, and soon certain ISO standards.

    Finally, I thought I'd just point out that the title of this thread is now something of a misnomer.
     
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