Old wooden boat

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Duco84, Oct 6, 2020.

  1. Duco84
    Joined: Feb 2014
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    Duco84 Junior Member

    Thank You for explanation and video. Please advise, what to use for space between planks, wood with epoxy, or only epoxy with filler? Is ti enough one layer 400g?
     
  2. Rumars
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Rumars Senior Member

    What you want, either is fine. Most people use wooden splines because it is cheaper then filling the gaps with thickened epoxy.

    One layer of fiberglass is enough, if done right wood movement is minimized, the fiberglass is only there to waterproof and make a good substrate for the paint. You could even go with lighter cloth or no cloth at all.
     
  3. Duco84
    Joined: Feb 2014
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    Duco84 Junior Member

    Please advise cold mold vs glass ok
     
  4. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

  5. Rumars
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Rumars Senior Member

    Cold molding gets you more stiffness but with more work. Beeing stiffer it resists potential plank movement better. Old boats that have been sanded repeatedly over their life might need the added material.
    You can have the same effect with fiberglass but you need a lot more of it to build up a comparable thickness, wich translates to more expense.
     
  6. brendan gardam
    Joined: Feb 2020
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    Location: east gippsland australia

    brendan gardam Senior Member

    does every wooden boat builders shop have a dragon in various states of repair. you even see them here in australia.
     
  7. brendan gardam
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    Location: east gippsland australia

    brendan gardam Senior Member

    but how far do you go before you say lets just make a glass hull off this boat and be done with the issues once and for all.
     

  8. Rumars
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Rumars Senior Member

    It's a question of money. A single light skin of fiberglass in epoxy or cold molding is cheaper then laying up a thick polyester hull. The result is lighter and stronger and at least as maintenance "free" as a glass hull. Converting to a full FRP hull usually happens in stages, somebody sheated an old tired hull and gave it another 10-20 years of life. By then all the original planking is rotten and the interior is tired enough that it makes sense to rip it all out from the inside and laminate up to thickness and rebuild the furniture.
    Timewise it's approximately the same if done right, the hull must be sanded, splined (one can use other glues for it instead of epoxy), faired and then sheated then faired again and painted.

    Dragons are everywhere because it was an olympic class, there is a strong class association with national and international regattas, and new boats are still beeing buildt (fiberglass).
     
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