Old Quarter Tonners -Magic Bus

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by steveo-nz, Oct 5, 2008.

  1. MF too
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    MF too New Member

    Hi Guys,

    Just found this thread while looking for something else.

    Thanks for bringing back many wonderful 1/4 ton, 1/2 ton, 3/4 ton memories to an old mind !

    I had lot of incidental comments to make to older posts, but that's late now.

    In a recent post CT 249 mentioned:
    "3/4 ton

    1975- Peterson's Solent Saracen?
    1976 - Finnfire (MH heavy)
    1977 - Joe Louis (the Frers heavy MH Samsara was 3rd IIRC).
    1978 - Maligawa (French frac)?????
    1979- Soldier Blu??? (X 102) followed by a few years of medium displacement X boats and Dehlers"


    - Samsara was more medium dspl than heavy (much lighter than the Spanish Taylor built Frers 33)
    - As often the results do not exactly reflect what happened on the water.
    - While we (Samsara) had dominated the early season, the Farr and the Berret's Oesophage Boogie tweaked their hull-ratings over the summer.
    - Whatever we did, even leading at the first mark, they would roar by on the reaching legs at the Cup.
    - 0esophage Boogie (the forerunner to the First 35) should have won the event hands on. She was much larger and much more tortured than Joe-Louis
    - But, in those days there were many factors including GPS-less,(read goniometer) navigation.
    - The -high points - long offshore offered a trap near Bordeaux, O-B made the largest mistake, Samsara a medium one, Joe Louis a small one, Valicelli on his own design sailed a perfect course.

    As a result Joe-Louis won the series ahead of of the med-displ MH Valicelli and Samsara in 3rd.

    - There was also a very nice daggerboard offshoot of Resolute Salmon, called North-Star, she was sailed fast by Eckart Wagner and Timmy Stearn.... but in a series where there was no discard ! we pinned them down in a right of way crossing in the first leg of the first race, and there final standing was hopeless.

    In other words, it was now clear that there was no chance left outside the light brigade.

    We had started sailing in parallel, very light fractional rig boats in the kiwi spirit (thanks to the 1/4 ton '75), and it's fantastic to think that 3 1/2 years earlier we were still sailing very very heavy lead-mines which they call classics now.
    The pace of change was just unbelievable.

    PS: Maligawa was a Fauroux design, she won the 3/4 ton in La Trinite, but I think it was in '80 or '81, after the DB1 domination, Samsara was there too and was keeping the DBs at arm length. with no problem

    You can see nice photographs of Maligawa and the Fauroux 1/4 ton, including a young Bruno Trouble at the helm of Lacydon Protis (pic #1) in the Fauroux website
    http://www.fauroux.com/architecturenavale/regate/image/Regate%20Prototype/index.html
     
  2. salkbj
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    salkbj Junior Member

    Maligawa

    Following could be red in one magazine after the 1980 3/4-ton cup in La Trinite:

    SOFT RIG WINS 3/4-TON CUP
    3/4-ton events does not attract as many pro-sailors as the 1-Ton, 1/2-Ton and 1/4-Ton Cups. Shame really, as 3/4-tonners are closest to most cruising boats in size.

    After last year's Cup in Denmark where "Regnbågen" won in very local competition this year's 3/4 Ton Cup was very competitive. Ten excellent crews had winning chances and there where many new designs.
    The races where off La Trinité, France, and was won by Jacques Fauroux, the winner of last year's 1/4 Ton Cup. Fauroux has done a lot of dinghy sailing. He has been both world and European champion in Moth.
    Fauroux also designed his winning boat "Maligawa". He prefers a long waterline, rather full and narrow canoe body. Maligawa has much in common with "Ar Bigouden", the winner of the Half Ton Cup this year in Sandhamn.
    Besides hull form also the new Sofarec mast. It bends more than normal both forward-aft as well as sideways. Center of gravity is lowered 5-7 % and it only weighs 45 kg as compared to 70 kg for a standard mast. Cost is however up some 30 %. With that mast reefing is delayed. Sideways bending makes the sail release the wind. It's just like the Soling, R6 and R12 rigs. The mast however requires precise trimming and therefore good crewing.
    Second came "Luv", sailed by Beilken, designed by Van de Stadt and built at the German Dehler shipyard. Dehlers by the way occupied places 2, 3, 5, 6. A great success for German 3/4-tonners. Best Swedish entry was "Vitres" [Holland-79] at an honorable ninth place. Crew was Sture and Ulf Wikman,
    Peder Cederskjöld, Benny Nilsson, Anders Persson, Göran Ekdahl.
     

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  3. HJAV
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    HJAV New Member

    Looking for information of old QT names Corse in 1985

    Hello,

    I recently bought an old QT in Germany and brougth here to Holland , and now I am restoring the boat, I am looking for info of the boat, she was built in Poland 1985, sailed in QT WorldChampionship in Corsica 1985, therefor named Corse, I am looking for old pictures etc Whatever info there is, I saw similar boats in Russia?? Konrad 77 ?? Maybe there is a connection ?

    Greetings from Holland Henk-Jan Visser
     

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  4. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Very sweet looking boat. Stern looks Berret - but overall looks Norlin - just a guess. What do you Scandinavian experts say?
     
  5. Paul B

    Paul B Previous Member

    You can look around http://25ft.org/ and if you see something interesting maybe you can find someone to help translate. There are photos of a lot of the fleet there (Russia) and rating certificates that should mention the designer.
     
  6. salkbj
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    salkbj Junior Member

    Polish Quarter

    The boat is offically designed by a mr. Grodzicki in 1985 and built as a one-off at the Conrad shipyard, listed as Conrad-777. The boats has participated at numerous QTC:s with the name "Cors" (PZ-43), Piotr Adamowicz.
     
  7. Stephen Ditmore
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    Stephen Ditmore Senior Member

    A really sweet quarter tonner was Blivit - Bruce Nelson's debut raceboat. Lee Creekmore showed up with a Creekmore 22 - pretty much a MORC boat but rating as a quarter ton, and finished 3rd to Blivit's first. Cudos to both designers. The J/24, the Moore 24, and MORC boats like the Creekmore 22 were ultimately the death of quarter tonners. They were faster and more sensible boats. And of course these days we have the Melges 24 and others. Still, it was exciting when custom boats competed against one another. Still hoping to see the GP 26s take off.
     
  8. Paul B

    Paul B Previous Member

    Do you have any idea where Blivit might be? I talked to Bruce about it last year and he said he last saw it somewhere on Long Island about 20 years ago, rotting away.

    Blivit was good, but at the '77 NAs it wasn't a match for the Davidson Fun or the Peterson Blitz. I think they did some mods before going to the '78 NAs and winning over a very small field. As you mentioned the non-IOR Creekmore finished 3rd, and I think a T-Bird finished 4th.
     
  9. HJAV
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    HJAV New Member

    Thanks for the info, I looked at the Russian site, my Russian litlle rusty.... nice pictures though Didnot found an IOR certificate, so I keep on searching

    Henk-Jan (HJAV)
     
  10. denis.kiely
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    denis.kiely New Member

  11. booster
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    booster Senior Member

    Grodzicki

    Well, Gary B had guess at Norlin. Yes, the bow looks Norlin. I would have said Tony Castro. Similar to the mystery boat in Sweden. Anyway, Grodzicki did a good job.
    Regards,
    Booster
     
  12. Richard 4073
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    Richard 4073 Junior Member

    hi all, really enjoyed reading this thread from start to finish (whew!), and after reading Light Brigade my childhood interest in the Ton era of the 70s has been well and truly rekindled, to the point of wanting to write my own book on that era, drawing together some of the material that is around, based on the NZ boats and the intrigue and competing arguments that arose in response to the new breed at the time. Have even had the pleasure of a recent interview with Laurie Davidson for this reason. Gary B, it would be great to have an offline chat with you about this if possible, would be happy to provide my hotmail email address if that is ok? I'm also wanting to cover off and explain some of the technicalities of the IOR rule as these seem to have been largely lost to the world (a good thing perhaps?!) and deserve I think to be recorded in some detail. Some of the comments in this thread and others have been of great use in filling in some of the gaps on that front.
    Cheers
    Richard
     
  13. booster
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    booster Senior Member

    new book

    Richard!
    I agree with you. Interesting that you are writing a book including an interview with Laurie Davidson. Perhaps I can arrange an interview with Peter Norlin for you. I met Norlin last week at a 2.4mr regatta. He is still racing at an age of 68. Let me know your e-mail.
    Regards,
    Booster
     
  14. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    hi Richard, There is a lot of interest in that unique NZ period '60's to mid '80's; Brian Peet is working on a book on Des Townson and I'm editing a very large collection of taped words on Jim Young - so your proposed book on that period of light displacement boats would be more grist for the mill. This historical stuff needs to be done before it is lost. My email: coxcreek@slingshot.co.nz
     

  15. Richard 4073
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    Richard 4073 Junior Member

    Thanks for your replies Booster and Gary - my email rich7140@hotmail.com, Gary I'll send a note to your email. Great to hear that Des' work is to be covered by Brian. Not familiar with Peter Norlin's work, but I would be interested in any observations on the workings of the IOR in this period, and the way the first round of amendments in '76 affected the measurement of broader sterns. Whiting (and Young) still seemed to achieve quite wide sterns, while Farr seemed to be able to remove the bustle entirely from his designs, although I think the latter was through less width. A fascinating era.
     
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