Old Johnson Seahorse 5.5hp

Discussion in 'Outboards' started by Header108, May 22, 2007.

  1. Header108
    Joined: May 2007
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    Location: Michigan

    Header108 New Member

    Just bought this motor at a yard sale owner said it ran great but after I installed new gas and oil and tried it out it would not run?
    Carb is getting gas but looks like no spark from plugs,should i replace the plugs first and retry and if no spark what is next?
    Also where can i find a manual for this old Seahorse?
    Do these old 2cycles have 2 coils or magnedo or points I Don't have a clue looks like everything is under the flywheel.
    Please help this is my first outboard!!
     
  2. Bergalia
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    Bergalia Senior Member

  3. redtech
    Joined: Feb 2007
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    redtech Senior Member

    if you can't find the year post the model number and we can tell you everythingas far as year, points, fuel mix, plugs, and any parts needed
     
  4. Header108
    Joined: May 2007
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    Header108 New Member

    Old Johnson 5.5 Seahorse

    The Model# is CD-13A
    I get no spark with this motor?
     
  5. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    alan white Senior Member

    Most likely, it has points and the points are corroded. A quick sanding with some 400 grit wet/dry sand paper and gap them to .025.
    This is no fix! It will get you a spark nine times out of ten, but you need to replace the points and condenser before long, best to do right away.
    Removing the flywheel is sometimes a chore. Aluminum and steel tend to marry together pretty well in the presence of seawater and humidity. Use a puller, WD40, and a sharp rap on the puller when tensioned.
    The .025 gap was my guess, a kind of average. It will get you a spark in any case.
    Somewhere on the engine you may find the actual gap listed. The other things to check are the switch in the handle or lever (it is a ground and disconnecting it from the handle for a moment will unground it if its's shorting), also trade plugs, though you must have done that already.

    Alan
     
  6. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    great article on testing your ignition. I had trouble getting the url, but google:
    fluke magneto outboard

    It's a pdf file, top of the page
     
  7. Syed
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    Syed Member

  8. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    alan white Senior Member

    You definately have magneto ignition with points and condenser if a '56.
    So most likely it's the points.
    Here's a tip: Points are often interchangable beween a wide variety of engines from different makers. I've successfully visually matched to currently sold points by askig the clerk if I can look at the whole inventory. Same for carb rebuild kits. May save some money.
    Check the engine kill switch first though, disconnecting it will get spark if the switch. Easier things first.
     
  9. Header108
    Joined: May 2007
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    Header108 New Member

    Old Seahorse

    where is the kill switch??
     
  10. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    I don't know. The engine will have a wire exiting from the area under the flywheel. It would lead to the mechanism that is used to stop the engine.
    There would be a copper or brass blade or finger that would be connected to the wire. Moving the lever to the stop position would make the blade contact through to the aluminum bracket it's mounted to.
    This would ground the ignition circuit and eliminate the spark. There would likely be a spade connector on the switch. Disconnect that and tape over it to ensure it doesn't inadvertantly ground while testing. Remove the plug wire and plug and put the plug back in the boot. Rest the plug against bare exposed metal of the engine anywhere convenient. Check for spark. Should be blue/purple and make a tiny click. Red is no good.
    this doesn't mean the wire is not worn through on a corner of sharp metal somewhere. check its condition as far as you can.
    If no luck with spark, remove flywheel. You need the right puller not to damage it. Should have threaded holes on face that you can use.
    I'm being general here. Use common sense. The fluke link shows you how to test everything with a VOM. I would suggest you clean and gap the points to .022---.025 and again check for spark (the flywheel back on but not tightened, just fitted is enough). Points should always be replaced anyway every so many hours, so if no luck get a new pair anyway, and a condenser too. You will need feeker guages, the flat kind, not like plug guages. Slight drag without moving the lever arm of the points when the cam lobe is opening the points to maximum. To make it easier, put the flywheel nut back on and snug it with a quick twist and then put a socket with a long handle on the nut and tape it to something to perfectly position the cam that opens the points and keep the engine from turning from that precise position.
     
  11. littlegirl
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    littlegirl New Member

  12. capt littlelegs
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    capt littlelegs New Member

    There are numerous reasons why an outboard won't run such as worn rings, bores, seals and reed valves, if you bought an old motor without seeing it run you might need expensive help! Assuming it is an ignition problem, spark plugs don't last forever and should be renewed, the stop switch can stay closed and the points close up and corrode to mention again the most common problems. If you can get the fly wheel off there will be two independant sets of coils and points, remove and using a points file, file them flat, set at 18 thou, any abrasive paper can leave loose deposits between the points. If you can't get the flywheel off there may be an access plate to get to the points for cleaning and adjusting. Personally I'd take it back to the seller and ask him to show me how to start it! ;)
     
  13. pistnbroke
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Noosa.Australia where god kissed the earth.

    pistnbroke I try

    for Alan white .....the colour of the spark is of no consequence is it is particles of the electrode material glowing.....what is most important is that the spark will jump 6 mm ( 1/4 in ) in air as if it will not do this it will not jump the plug gap under pressure ..

    Remember the kill or stop switch joins the ignition to earth to stop the engine ..its not like a car off is go and on is stop
     
  14. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    powerabout Senior Member

    many of those old tiller engines didnt have stop switches they just retarded the ignition so far they stopped
     

  15. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    The magnito then was a hunk crap , my guess is you will need to coils as well as a set of points.

    No fear , the parts are at NAPA and quire inexpensive. Just ask for the Marine book,

    FF
     
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