Ocean News

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by ImaginaryNumber, Oct 8, 2015.

  1. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Most land-based ecosystems worldwide risk 'major transformation' due to climate change | Science Daily

    Under a "business as usual" emissions scenario vegetation changes across the planet's wild landscapes will likely be more far-reaching and disruptive than earlier studies suggested.

    The changes will threaten global biodiversity and derail vital services that nature provides to humanity, such as water security, carbon storage and recreation.

    Some of the expected vegetational changes are already underway in places like the American West and Southwest.

    The fact that predictions from these diverse approaches are converging "strengthens the inference that projected climate changes will drive major ecosystem transformations."

    The study, published in Science, is the first to use paleoecological data to project the magnitude of future ecosystem changes on a global scale.
     
  2. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    The Ocean Cleanup Is Starting, Aims To Cut Garbage Patch By 90% By 2040
    The Ocean Cleanup Is Starting, Aims To Cut Garbage Patch By 90% By 2040 https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffkart/2018/08/28/the-ocean-cleanup-is-starting-aims-to-cut-garbage-patch-by-90-by-2040/#648bab7b253e

    [​IMG]

    A massive cleanup of plastic in the seas will begin in the Pacific Ocean, by way of Alameda, California. The Ocean Cleanup, an effort that's been five years in the making, plans to launch its beta cleanup system, a 600-meter (almost 2,000-foot) long floater that can collect about five tons of ocean plastic per month.

    The Ocean Cleanup plans to monitor the performance of the beta, called System 001, and have an improved fleet of 60 more units skimming the ocean for plastics in about a year a half. The ultimate goal of the project, founded by Dutch inventor Boyan Slat when he was 18, is to clean up 50% of the patch in five years, with a 90% reduction by 2040.

    The Ocean Cleanup, an effort that's been five years in the making, plans to launch its beta cleanup system, a 600-meter (almost 2,000-foot) long floater that can collect about five tons of ocean plastic per month.
    ....................................................................................................................

    This thing will pick up 60 tons per year. 8,800,000 tons of plastic get dumped in the ocean every year.

    8,800,000 divided by 60 = 146,666

    It would take 146,666 of these things just to keep pace with the amount of plastic we dump in now. That's not even including the 165,000,000 tons that are already in the ocean.

    146,666 times 2,000' = 293,332,000 feet. 293,332,000 divided by 5,280 feet = 55,555.

    That's 55,555 miles of these things just to keep pace.

    This thing will work to skim money from people but won't make a dent in the oceans trash.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2018
  3. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Global warming: More insects, eating more crops | PHYS.org

    Crop losses for critical food grains will increase substantially as rising temperatures increase the metabolic rate and population growth of insect pests.

    Worldwide, insect pests currently consume up to 20 percent of the plants that humans grow for food.

    Crop losses are projected to rise by 10 to 25% per degree of warming, resulting in up to a 75% increase in losses if temperatures increase by 3°C.

    Insects have an optimal temperature where their population grows best. As the tropics increase in temperature insect populations will increase slowly. But in the temperate regions (Europe and North America), temperature increases will cause insect populations to grow faster.

    Wheat, which is typically grown in cool climates, will suffer the most, as increased temperatures will lead to greater pest populations and survival rates over the winter.

    Maize, which is grown in some areas where population rates will increase and others where they will decline, will face a more uneven future.

    For rice, which is mostly grown in warm tropical environments, crop losses will likely stabilize if average temperatures rise above 3°C, as insect population growth drop.
     
  4. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Africa to suffer major blackouts as climate change dries up hydropower dams | The Independent

    Countries in southern and eastern Africa are due to more than double their hydropower capacity by 2030.

    The El Niño in 2015 and 2016 brought drought conditions to southern Africa and lowered water levels in dams so much that many areas experienced blackouts.

    Many of the dams currently being planned will be located in the same river basins that have been worst affected by drought in recent years.

    Major hubs outside of Africa, from Mexico City to London, are likely to feel the effects of droughts as well.

    The study was sponsored by the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Political Science.
     
  5. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Melting Glaciers in Canada Could Indicate Acceleration in Global Warming | Newsweek

    Between 1999 and 2015 1,350 out of 1,800 glaciers in Canada's Ellesmere Island shrank as average temperatures in the area rose more than 3 degrees.

    This is 1,050 square miles of glaciers that have melted, compared to 588 square miles over the 40 years between 1959 and 2000.

    Since the first survey of the region in 1906, the island has lost more than 90 percent of its original ice cover, according to The Canadian Encyclopedia.

    The study was published in the Journal of Glaciology.
     
  6. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    How Much Hotter Is Your Hometown Than When You Were Born? | New York Times

    As the world warms because of human-induced climate change, most of us can expect to see more days when temperatures hit 90 degrees Fahrenheit (32 degrees Celsius) or higher. See how your hometown has changed so far and how much hotter it may get.

    [An interactive feature. Enter a LOCATION and a START YEAR]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Many Major Airports Are Near Sea Level. A Disaster in Japan Shows What Can Go Wrong. | New York Times

    A quarter of the world’s 100 busiest airports are less than 10 meters, or 32 feet, above sea level.

    Twelve of those airports — including hubs in Shanghai, Rome, San Francisco and New York — are less than 5 meters above sea level.

    Hurricane Sandy in 2012 inundated all three airports that serve New York City.

    Typhoon Goni closed runways at Hongqiao International Airport outside Shanghai in 2015.

    This past week, Kansai airport, which serves Osaka, Kyoto and Kobe, was flooded by Typhoon Jebi, which generated a storm surge that reached almost 11 feet, a record for Osaka Bay.

    [​IMG]
    Kansai airport, which serves Osaka, Kyoto and Kobe,
    was inundated this past week when a typhoon hit Japan.​
     
  8. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    "More than 4,000 miles (6,440 kilometres) of internet cable are projected to go underwater in the next 15 years,
    and Americans living in New York, Miami, and Seattle are most vulnerable to related infrastructure damage, a team of researchers found.

    Scientists at the University of Oregon and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who presented their study at a July conference, concluded that more than 1,000 data centres, which store servers and routers, could be damaged due to floods."
    Internet access in the US could be threatened by rising sea levels in as little as 15 years https://www.businessinsider.com.au/internet-access-threatened-by-rising-seas-in-next-15-years-2018-8?r=US&IR=T
     
  9. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Deep Coral Reefs Are No Haven From Climate Change | Discover

    Previous theories thought that deep reefs might be protected from damage by warming waters.

    A team of deep-diving scientists has proven that assumption to be wrong for two reasons.

    First, deep reefs are a distinct ecosystem, meaning shallow-living species can't migrate to deep waters.

    And second, deep reefs are as endangered by climate change and overfishing as shallow reefs.

    The study was published in Science.
     
  10. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Scientists Have Announced an Incredible Plan to Make It Rain in The Sahara Desert | Science Alert

    The Sahara is desirable to supply solar and wind energy because it's sparsely populated, the landscape isn't widely used for other things humans need like agriculture, plus the Sahara is located close to Europe and the Middle East – which have huge energy demands.

    New research suggests that large-scale installation of solar and wind farms in the Sahara can bring more rainfall and promote vegetation growth.

    The rainfall increase is a consequence of complex land-atmosphere interactions that occur because solar panels and wind turbines create rougher and darker land surfaces.

    Models show that large-scale solar and wind farms in the Sahara would more than double the precipitation in the Sahara, and the most substantial increase occurs in the Sahel, where the magnitude of rainfall increase is between ~200 and ~500 mm per year, resulting in a vegetation cover fraction increases by about 20 percent.

    To accomplish this would require a solar farm roughly the size of China or the United States, with wind turbines covering about 20 percent of the Sahara.

    Such a facility would produce about 82 terawatts of electrical power annually. In 2017, the global energy demand was only 18 terawatts, which suggests we may be able to eliminate our use of fossil fuel.

    The study was published in Science.
     
  11. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    There's 4 active hurricanes at the moment, 3 in the Atlantic headed for the US. I think we gave all our FEMA emergency reserve supply of paper towels to Puerto Rico last year and we've probably eliminated most social/emergency programs in order to help the wealthy with their crushing tax burdens, so a person can't really count on much government help this year. Good luck! I almost forgot, thoughts and prayers!
     
  12. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    U.N. Chief Warns of a Dangerous Tipping Point on Climate Change | New York Times

    On Monday António Guterres, United Nations secretary general, called on global leaders to rein in climate change faster.

    “If we do not change course by 2020, we risk missing the point where we can avoid runaway climate change. Climate change is the defining issue of our time, and we are at a defining moment,” he said. “Scientists have been telling us for decades. Over and over again. Far too many leaders have refused to listen.”

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    Trump Administration Wants to Make It Easier to Release Methane Into Air | New York Times

    The Trump administration is taking its third major step this year to roll back federal efforts to fight climate change.

    The Environmental Protection Agency plans to make public a proposal to weaken requirements that companies monitor and repair methane leaks.

    The Interior Department is also expected in coming days to release its final version of a rule that essentially repeals a restriction on the intentional venting and “flaring,” or burning, of methane from drilling operations.

    In July, the E.P.A. proposed weakening a rule on carbon dioxide pollution from vehicle tailpipes.

    In August the E.P.A. proposed allowing far more CO2 from coal-fired power plants.
     
  13. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    BBC admits ‘we get climate change coverage wrong too often’ | The Guardian

    BBC editorial policy has been changed to include:

    “Manmade climate change exists: If the science proves it we should report it.”

    “To achieve impartiality, you do not need to include outright deniers of climate change in BBC coverage, in the same way you would not have someone denying that Manchester United won 2-0 last Saturday. The referee has spoken.”

    “There are occasions where contrarians and sceptics should be included. These may include, for instance, debating the speed and intensity of what will happen in the future, or what policies government should adopt.”
     
  14. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    'A single piece of plastic' can kill sea turtles, says study | BBC

    Researchers found there was a one in five chance of death for a turtle who consumed just one piece of plastic

    And 50% chance of mortality if they ate 14 pieces.

    Younger turtles are at a higher risk of dying than adults.

    Because of their digestive tract, they don't regurgitate anything. If plastic ends up in the wrong place, a blockage can result in death.

    The study was published in the journal Scientific Reports.

     

  15. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Category 6? Climate change may cause more hurricanes to rapidly intensify | Washington Post

    In little more than a day, Hurricane Florence exploded in strength, jumping from a Category 1 to a Category 4.

    Last year's Hurricane Maria went from a tropical depression into a Category 5 storm in just over two days.

    New research says that as the climate continues to warm, storms will intensifying faster and more often, and in some extreme cases, grow so powerful that they might arguably be labeled “Category 6.

    Under a middle-of-the-road climate change scenario the study suggests that:
    • Between 2016 and 2035 there will be more hurricanes in general and 11 percent more hurricanes of the Category 3, 4 and 5 classes.
    • That storms of super-extreme intensity, with maximum sustained winds above 190 mph, would increase from nine of these storms in a simulation of the late 20th century climate, to 32 for the period from 2016 to 2035 and 72 for the period from 2081 to 2100.
     
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